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Department of Geography

Staff Profile

Mr Avidesh Seenath, B.Sc. | M.Phil.

Research Postgraduate (PhD) in the Department of Geography
Room number: S105

Contact Mr Avidesh Seenath (email at avidesh.seenath@durham.ac.uk)

I am an early-stage researcher with key interests in coastal geomorphological change and flood vulnerability under climate change, which entails the application of numerical modelling, remote sensing, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). My overall aspiration is to map and understand the drivers of coastal change in the Caribbean for informing coastal management in the region. Such information is of paramount importance given ongoing rising sea-level trends and anticipated increases in storm surge intensity under climate change, particularly for the Caribbean where there is a lack of data on climate change vulnerability. 

Academic Qualifications

2016 - Present: Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) Geography - Durham University, United Kingdom.

Thesis: Numerical Modelling of Shoreline Evolution in Response to Anthropogenic Forcing

2012 - 2015: Master of Philosophy (M.Phil.) Geography - The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus, Trinidad.

Thesis: Comparing Hydrodynamic Models and GIS for Coastal Flood Vulnerability Assessments

Funding: Partnership for Canada-Caribbean Community Climate Change Adaptation (ParCA) Scholarship

2009 - 2012: Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) Geography with Environmental Biology (First Class Honours) - The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus, Trinidad. 

Key Research Interests

My key research interest revolve around coastal geomorphological change and flood vulnerability under climate change, as previously mentioned. Such interest can be classified into five main areas:

  1. Detection and monitoring of coastal change through remote sensing and numerical modelling applications.
  2. Forecasting flood vulnerability under projections of climate change impacts (i.e. sea-level rise and storm surges) for Small Island Developing States (SIDS).
  3. Understanding and projecting the impact of extreme sea events on coastal morphology.
  4. Quantifying social vulnerability to coastal hazards through GIS applications.
  5. Coastal flood risk mapping.

Teaching: Tutoring and Demonstrating

Tutor:

  1. GEOG 1081: Physical Geography (2016-2017)
  2. GEOG 2661: Cimate Change: Geographical Perspectives (2017-2018)

Demonstrator:

  1. GEOG 1232: Introduction to Geographical Research-BSc (2016-2017)
  2. GEOG 1251: Understanding Earth's Principles (2017-2018)
  3. GEOG 2571: Global Environmental Change (2017-2018)
  4. GEOG 2591: Handling Spatial Data (2016-2017)
  5. GEOG 3261: Remote Sensing (2017-2018)

Conference Presentations

Oral Presentations

  1. Seenath, A., M. Wilson, and K. Miller (2014). ‘Projecting the Current and Future Impact of Storm Surges on Coastal Flood Extent at Pigeon Point, South-West Tobago, through Hydrodynamic Modeling Analyses.’ Presented at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly, Vienna, Austria on May 02. (Session NH5.4: Monitoring and Modelling to Guide Coastal Adaptation to Extreme Sea Events in a Changing Climate).
  2. Seenath, A., M. Wilson, and K. Miller (2014). ‘A Comparative Analysis of Hydrodynamic and GIS Modelling for Coastal Flood Vulnerability Assessment to Determine the Best Approach for Guiding Coastal Management.’ Presented at the Coastal Zone Canada Conference, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada on June 16. (Session C6: Mapping Sea Level Rise).
  3. Seenath, A. (2014). ‘Hydrodynamic and GIS Modelling for Coastal Flood Vulnerability Assessment.’ Presented at the Coastal Zone Canada Conference, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, on June 18. (Session S20: Joining Forces - C-Change/ParCA Synthesis).

Selected Publications

Journal Article

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