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Biophysical Sciences Institute

Event Listings

Wednesday 10 February 2016

Chemistry Seminar

CG60 16.15

Multiple Catalytic Promiscuity in the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily: Rules and Tools, Dr Florian Hollfelder, University of Cambridge


Thursday 11 February 2016

Public Lecture

Leech Hall, St John\'s College, 17.30-18.30

What have Restriction Enzymes Ever Done for Us? Prof. David Dryden
This lecture will show how the enzymes are used in biotechnology and also address the fundamental importance of restriction modification systems in Nature.


Monday 15 February 2016

Special BSI Lunchtime Seminar

Pennington Room, Grey College, 11-12

Protein-lipid interactions in influenza viral entry, Dr Peter Kasson , University of Virginia. The seminar will be followed by the February BSI Lunch.

Abstract: Influenza virus infects cells by binding to cell-surface glycans and then undergoing membrane fusion with endocytic compartments to release its genome into the cytoplasm. Intriguingly, lipid-modifying drugs can affect viral infectivity, suggesting a possible avenue for therapeutic intervention. We wish to understand how lipid-protein interactions and the membrane chemistry of both virus and cellular targets can affect infectious outcomes. To that end, we have combined large-scale molecular simulation, fluorescence spectroscopy, and electron cryo-microscopy to understand how influenza viral proteins interact with target membranes and how changes to membrane composition affect fusion behavior and membrane organization. I will discuss progress in this regard, particularly the interesting and complex role of cholesterol in controlling viral membrane fusion and membrane organization.


BSI Lunch: February

Pennington Room, Grey College, 12.00-13.30.

The BSI Lunches bring together BSI members and others engaged in BSI research.

The February BSI Lunch follows a special BSI lunchtime seminar.

All are welcome, please register (and include any special dietary requirements) by email to k.h.baker@dur.ac.uk.


Wednesday 17 February 2016

Chemistry Seminar

CG60, 16:15

Recent Developments in Asymmetric Catalysis and Total Synthesis Professor Pat Guiry, University College Dublin


Monday 22 February 2016

IAS Seminar

IAS Seminar Room Palace Green, 13.00-14.00.

Enzymes in cells or test tubes: are they the same thing? Prof. David Dryden

Abstract: Enzymes are traditionally purified from their usual intracellular environment and subsequently studied in dilute aqueous solutions. For enzymes catalysing reactions on small molecules, the test tube results are usually similar to the results of experiments performed inside cells. For enzymes acting on large molecules such as DNA, the two experimental situations are likely to be very different. Is there a simple way of linking them together or is it just too complex?


Friday 26 February 2016

BSI Lunchtime Seminar

Pennington Room, Grey College, 11.30

Exploring the DNA mimicry of the Ocr protein of phage T7, Professor David Dryden, University of Edinburgh. The seminar will be followed by a February BSI Lunch.


BSI lunch

Pennington Room, Grey College, 12.30-13.30.

The BSI Lunches bring together BSI members and others engaged in BSI research.The February BSI Lunch follows a special BSI lunchtime seminar.

All are welcome, please register (and include any special dietary requirements) by email to k.h.baker@dur.ac.uk.


Friday 18 March 2016

BSI seminar

Grey College, Pennington Room, 11.30

Optimising protein folding with a parallel-processing, iterative annealing machine,Prof. George Lorimer, University of Maryland, US. The seminar will be followed by the March BSI Lunch.

Abstract: Some 50 years ago Anfinsen showed that the folded, biologically active form of most proteins is its thermodynamically most stable state. This state can be reached by a spontaneous, exergonic folding reaction that can occur in the absence of cellular catalysts (enzymes), without the expenditure of cellular energy (ATP). But not all proteins do so under all conditions. Twenty-five years ago we demonstrated the existence of a group of indispensible proteins (the chaperonins GroEL and GroES) that, driven by the hydrolysis of ATP, enable these recalcitrant proteins to achieve their native states. The chaperonins are cellular machines, progressing through a series of distinct structural states that can be structurally described by crystallography and cryo-EM and kinetically and thermodynamically described by multiple spectroscopies. During the course of a chaperonin cycle, the unfolded substrate protein is captured by a vacant GroEL ring, transiently encapsulated in the central cavity and released, folded or not, after a few seconds. The yield of folded protein per cycle is typically just a few percent, necessitating multiple iterative cycles. Our extensive pre-steady state analyses, employing multiple spectroscopic probes, demonstrate that the chaperonins function as parallel-processing, iterative annealing machines.


BSI lunch: March

Pennington Room, Grey College, 12.30-13.30.

The BSI Lunches bring together BSI members and others engaged in BSI research.

The March BSI Lunch follows a special BSI lunchtime seminar.

All are welcome, please register (and include any special dietary requirements) by email to k.h.baker@dur.ac.uk.


Monday 4 April 2016

DCSM and BSI seminar

CG60 14.00

Mesoscopic Modelling of Viscoelastic Properties of Thread-like Micellar Solutions, Prof Ron Larson. Tea and coffee will follow this seminar in the Scarborough cafe.

Abstract: Surfactant molecules self-assemble in water into a variety of aggregate structures, including long, entangled thread-like micelles. The complex dependencies of micellar structures on various types and concentrations of surfactant, salt, and additives (for instance, perfumes), make such solutions difficult to characterize and design for applications, such as shampoos and body washes. Using a novel fast “pointer algorithm” which tracks boundaries between relaxed and un-relaxed portions of wormlike micelles, combined with the Cates model for micellar diffusion, breakage, and re-joining, we make quantitative prediction of experimental flow behaviors for wormlike micelle solutions with for a range of concentrations of surfactant, salt, and other solution components. In order to extract important micelle properties from oscillatory flow measurements, we also developed an automatic procedure determined accuracies of estimates assessed by “sensitivity” studies (i.e. analyses on the sensitivity of estimated parameters to error or noise). Recent application of our simulation model to commercial surfactant solutions prepared by Procter and Gamble shows good accuracy of our estimations and practical use in understating the effects of salt and additives on micellar properties. To extend our success in modelling unbranched wormlike micelles, we are now making progress to include the effect of micelle branches and networks in our simulation model, which will allow modeling of the flow properties of micellar solutions across the whole range of salt concentrations, including conditions where micellar branching is present.


Friday 29 April 2016

BSI Networking Event

29 April

11-12.30, Pennington Room, Grey College

On the 29th of April a special BSI Networking/Career Development Workshop will preceed the BSI Lunch. This event will focus on issues commonly encountered during multidisciplinary research and by the teams embarking upon it. The April BSI Lunch will immediately follow the workshop.


BSI Lunch: April

12.30-13.30, Location to be confirmed.

The BSI Lunches bring together BSI members and others engaged in BSI research.

The April BSI Lunch will follow a networking workshop aimed at supporting multidisciplinary research.

All are welcome, please register (and include any special dietary requirements) by email to k.h.baker@dur.ac.uk.


Friday 27 May 2016

Special BSI Lunchtime Seminar

Pennington Room, Grey College, 11-12.

A special BSI seminar will be held details TBC. The seminar will be followed by the May BSI Lunch.


BSI Lunch: May

Pennington Room, Grey College,12.00-13.30.

The BSI Lunches bring together BSI members and others engaged in BSI research.

The May BSI Lunch will follow a special BSI lunchtime seminar.

All are welcome, please register (and include any special dietary requirements) by email to k.h.baker@dur.ac.uk.


Friday 17 June 2016

Monday 20 June 2016

Durham Lecture Series 2016

20-24 June

16:00 in TBC

Presented by Sir J Fraser Stoddart, Northwestern University

The Durham Lecture Series 2016 will run from June 20th - 24th. Sir J Fraser Stoddart will present 3 lectures on the Tues, Wed and Thurs of that week.


Friday 24 June 2016

BSI Workshop: Wellcome Trust Collaborative Grants Scheme

Pennington Room, Grey College 11-12.30

Wellcome Trust Collaborative Grants Scheme next closing date: 21 September 2015

This session is specifically for BSI members and immediately precedes the BSI lunch on the 24th of June.

Please register by email to k.h.baker@dur.ac.uk.


BSI Lunch: June

Pennington Room, Grey College, 12.30-13.30.

The BSI Lunches bring together BSI members and others engaged in BSI research.

The June lunch will follow a Welcome Trust Scheme workshop aimed at supporting BSI members who are submitting to the upcoming Welcome Trust Schemes.

All are welcome, please register (and include any special dietary requirements) by email to k.h.baker@dur.ac.uk


Monday 4 July 2016

British Society for Research on Ageing 2016

4-6th July 2016, Durham University

The 66th BSRA Annual Scientific Meeting Evolution and the Biology of Ageing


Wednesday 14 September 2016

British Society for Parasitology Autumn Symposium in colloboration with the RSC

14-16th September 2016, Durham University

Microbial protein targets: towards understanding and intervention

This symposium will bring together leading expertise in protein structure determination, biochemical characterization and chemical biology to explore the most recent advances in the understanding of protein function and inhibition in microbial pathogens – both bacteria and parasites.

Sessions include:

  • Microbial protein structure determination and analyses
  • Biochemical analyses of microbial protein functionality
  • Chemical tools for probing microbial protein function
  • Structure, function and rational drug discovery

Contact Details

Biophysical Sciences Institute
Durham University.
South Road,
Durham,
DH1 3LE
+44 (0) 191 334 2351

email: admin.bsi@durham.ac.uk