Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences

Development and Regeneration

Group Coordinator: Dr. Carrie Ambler

Our Research Discussion Group studies how organisms develop from initial stem cells to early embryos to adulthood and how adult tissues are repaired and regenerated throughout an organism's life.

Embryo tissue development and adult tissue repair and regeneration are highly related processes; both rely on populations of stem cells or uncommitted precursor cells to undergo a highly-coordinated and step-wise programme of differentiation to produce the completed structure. The Development and Regeneration Research Discussion Group is an association of scientists with common interests in these two processes and how we can best apply our knowledge of normal, healthy development and regeneration to improve therapies for human diseases and pathologies. Although we are aligned to a common theme, the members of our group have varied research strengths in such areas as the regulation and differentiation of embryonic and tissue specific stem cells (e.g. epidermal, dermal, neural and cardiac stem cells), the genetic defects in familiar muscular dystrophy and the factors controlling skin and hair follicle development, maintenance and wound repair. Moreover, a core focus of this group is working to engineer new technologies need to provide improved solutions for regenerative therapy. Scientists in the Development and Regeneration Research Discussion Group are members of several University institutes and centres including the BSI, NESCI and Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine.

Staff

Academic Staff

Research Staff

Research Contract Technicians

School Services - Experimental Officers and Technicians

Research Student

From other departments

  • Mrs Natalie Craig

Publications by staff in this group

Journal papers: academic