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Department of Philosophy

Forthcoming Research Seminars and Lectures

(For past seminars and lectures see here)


Please use the form at the bottom of this page should you wish to be added to our Events Mailing List


23rd April 2015: Maria Baghramian (UCD) - Relativism: Disagreement or Difference?

This Weekly Research Seminar will commence at 11:30am. The seminar will take place in room 005, 48/49 Old Elvet. Refreshments will be available from 11:00am with the talk commencing at 11:30am.

More about 23rd April 2015: Maria Baghramian (UCD) - Relativism: Disagreement or Difference?


29th April 2015: Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture - John Hyman (Oxford) - Action and Integration

This Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture will be held in the Birley Room, Hatfield College. Refreshments will be available from 5pm with commencement of the lecture at 5:30pm.

More about 29th April 2015: Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture - John Hyman (Oxford) - Action and Integration


07th May 2015: Emma Bullock (KCL) - Details to be confirmed

This Weekly Research Seminar will commence at 11:30am. The seminar will take place in room 005, 48/49 Old Elvet. Refreshments will be available from 11:00am with the talk commencing at 11:30am.

More about 07th May 2015: Emma Bullock (KCL) - Details to be confirmed


16th - 17th July 2015: Hume and Naturalism workshop

Hume’s work has been regarded by many as a strong influence on the formation of philosophical naturalism, and it is clear that naturalism informs Hume’s work on epistemology, philosophy of mind and ethics, amongst other topics. More generally some influential interpretations regard Hume’s naturalism as helping to lay the foundations for a ‘disenchanted’ conception of the world. However, recent work on the character of philosophical naturalism, for example work seeking to present and defend non-reductive, less scientistic forms of naturalism, suggest different ways to interpret Hume’s work. There may be reasons to maintain that Hume’s naturalism represents the kind of view opposed by these alternative forms. But, arguably, there are a number of ways that our understanding of Hume can be enhanced by adopting different conceptions of what naturalism amounts to. This workshop aims to identify and explore the range of interpretive possibilities in this context.

More about 16th - 17th July 2015: Hume and Naturalism workshop


 

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