Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Events

Economics and Finance seminar series

Wednesday, 31 October 2018
15:30 to 17:00
Dr Robert Zymek
Durham University Business School, MHL 453

Dr Robert Zymek, Lecturer in Economics at the University Of Edinburgh will be the guest speaker.

Dr Robert Zymek, will be discussing: Bilateral Trade Imbalances

For more information please click here

In standard quantitative models, bilateral trade imbalances are determined by aggregate trade imbalances, expenditure and production patterns, and trade wedges. We calibrate such a model using recent data on incomes, factor endowments, and sector-level expenditures, outputs and bilateral trade flows for 40 economies and the rest of the world. Large pairwise asymmetries in trade wedges are needed for the model's bilateral-trade predictions to match the data. They account for 21-35% of the standard deviation of bilateral trade imbalances. Aggregate imbalances play a minor role, while more than 50% of the variation is explained by international differences in production and expenditure patterns.

Economics and Finance seminar series

Wednesday, 31 October 2018
15:30 to 17:00
Dr Robert Zymek
Durham University Business School, MHL 453

Dr Robert Zymek, Lecturer in Economics at the University Of Edinburgh will be the guest speaker.

Dr Robert Zymek, will be discussing: Bilateral Trade Imbalances

For more information please click here

In standard quantitative models, bilateral trade imbalances are determined by aggregate trade imbalances, expenditure and production patterns, and trade wedges. We calibrate such a model using recent data on incomes, factor endowments, and sector-level expenditures, outputs and bilateral trade flows for 40 economies and the rest of the world. Large pairwise asymmetries in trade wedges are needed for the model's bilateral-trade predictions to match the data. They account for 21-35% of the standard deviation of bilateral trade imbalances. Aggregate imbalances play a minor role, while more than 50% of the variation is explained by international differences in production and expenditure patterns.