Durham University

School of Government & International Affairs

LV25 Philosophy and Politics BA Undergraduate  2019

Essentials

Essentials

UCAS code LV25
Degree BA
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 3 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
AAA
BTEC
DDD
International Baccalaureate
37
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/philosophy
www.durham.ac.uk/sgia
www.durham.ac.uk/sgia
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The study of philosophy at Durham does not follow one particular school. The Department is unique in the UK in its wide-ranging expertise in Anglo-American analytical philosophy and Continental philosophy. Each of these has its own distinctive set of issues and approaches to resolving them. We also have special expertise in the philosophy of science, and social science, and the history of science and medicine. So at Durham, you will follow one of the widest-ranging philosophy degrees in the country.

At Durham, you will have the opportunity to study Philosophy as a Single Honours degree, or with another subject including: English, Music, Psychology, Politics or Theology. Philosophy can also be combined in a Joint Honours degree within the Natural Sciences programme or as part of a Combined Honours degree.

Philosophy is a new subject for many students, so in your first year you follow a range of introductory courses, introducing the fundamental philosophical subject areas.

Year 1

In their first year, all students take the Philosophy core modules of Ethics and Values, Knowledge and Reality, and Reading Philosophy. The first two of these concern the two broad divisions of Philosophy, into Metaphysics and Theory of Knowledge on the one hand, and Moral Philosophy on the other.

Reading Philosophy is a text-based course which examines in depth classic works by writers such as Plato, Hume and Sartre.

Students also take two core modules in Politics, Democratic Political Systems, and Political Theory, and one module from a range of electives. Examples of possible modules include:

  • International Security, Interdependence and Organisation
  • Global Regions in International Relations
  • Introduction to International Relations, and
  • Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Years 2 and 3

In the second year, all students take Moral Theory and Political Philosophy.

In the second and third years, students also have a choice of a wide range of topics within Philosophy. In previous years these have included:

  • Philosophy of Mind
  • Modern Philosophy I and II
  • Theory, Literature and Society
  • Gender, Film and Society
  • Issues in Contemporary Ethics
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Metaphysics
  • Language, Logic and Reality
  • Twentieth Century European Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Science
  • The Philosophy of Economics and Politics: Theory, Methods and Values
  • Applied Ethics
  • Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Science
  • History and Philosophy of Psychiatry
  • Biomedical Ethics Past and Present.

A similarly wide range of modules are available in Politics. In previous years these have included:

  • International Theory
  • The Politics of Pacific Asia
  • Foundations of Western Political Thought
  • Sovereignty, State and Empire
  • Global Political Economy
  • Middle East in the International System
  • Democracy and Democratic Theory
  • Class, Nation and British Politics
  • The Ethics of Violence in International Relations
  • Culture and Conflict in American Politics
  • The New Germany
  • Nations and Nationalism
  • Israel: Politics and Society
  • Evolution and Development of Military Occupation
  • Parties, MPs and Parliamentary Politics in Britain

 

You will also have the opportunity to study a subject in depth, by writing a substantial Dissertation of your choice.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year, and will publish finalised core requirements for 2019 entry from September 2018.

Study Abroad

Philosophy

We currently participate in exchange schemes through which you may spend a year of your studies abroad, either with universities in Europe – through the SOCRATES/ERASMUS programme – or with the University of California.

School of Government and International Affairs

Students can apply for a one-year study placement in one of the following institutions: the University of California and Boston College in the USA, British Columbia in Canada, the University of Hong Kong, and the National University of Singapore. In some cases courses are offered in English, while in others teaching is in the local language. We have an ERASMUS/Year Abroad Co-ordinator who will help you prepare for your year abroad, and who will maintain contact with you while you are away.

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Course Detail

Course Detail

To find out more about the modules available to students studying at Durham University please click here.

Please note: Current modules are indicative. Information for future academic years may change, for example, due to developments in the relevant academic field, or in light of student feedback.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

Students on this programme learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials (Politics & Philosophy), informal but scheduled one-on-one support, and self-directed learning, such as research, reading, and writing.

All of these are supported by a state of the art virtual learning environment, Durham University Online (DUO). Seminars and tutorials are much smaller groups than lectures, with tutorials often involving no more than eight students working with a professor or lecturer; seminars and workshops can be larger but are still small enough to allow one-on-one interaction with tutors; some of these also allow hands-on experience of the kind of work professional political scientists perform.

This emphasis on small-group teaching reflects a conscious choice to enhance the quality of the learning experience rather than the quantity of formal sessions. In fact, the degree programme is designed to feature fewer formal sessions and more independent research as students move from their first to their final year.

Small-group teaching and one-on-one attention from the personal academic advisor (provided for all students when they enter the programme) are part of the learning experience throughout, but by the final year classroom time gives way, to some extent, to independent research, including a capstone dissertation—supported by one-on-one supervision—that makes up a third of final year credits.

In this way the degree programme systematically transforms the student from a consumer of knowledge in the classroom to a generator of knowledge, ready for professional or postgraduate life. These formal teaching arrangements are supported by “drop-in” surgeries with teaching staff and induction sessions that begin in the week before the start of the programme and continue at key times throughout each year of the programme.

Students can also attend an extensive programme of research-focused seminars where staff and visiting scholars present their cutting-edge research.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

  • To study Philosophy and Politics you must have AAA at A Level, or the equivalent, in arts or science subjects. Philosophy at AS or A- level is not a requirement.
  • Please note we do not accept General Studies or Critical Thinking as part of our offer.
  • For Philosophy and Politics, you will also need grade A in at least one social science or humanities subject at A Level or equivalent.
  • Typical IB score 37 to include 666 in higher level subjects. Higher level requirements apply, see above.
  • We consider each application holistically. Whilst academic achievement is important, it is not the only factor that we consider when assessing applications and applicants who have achieved, or are predicted to achieve, close to our typical offer, but who have not met it exactly, will be welcome to apply if they have a strong application in other key elements, for example can demonstrate merit and potential through their personal statement or their reference. 
  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • An interview may form part of the entry requirements for mature students with non-standard qualifications.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

Science A Levels

Applicants taking Science A Levels that include a practical component will be required to take and pass this as a condition of entry. This applies only to applicants sitting A Levels with an English examination board.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £9,250.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £19,250.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

LV25 Philosophy and Politics BA Undergraduate  2020

Essentials

Essentials

UCAS code LV25
Degree BA
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 3 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
AAA
BTEC
DDD
International Baccalaureate
37
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/philosophy
www.durham.ac.uk/sgia
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The study of philosophy at Durham does not follow one particular school. The Department is unique in the UK in its wide-ranging expertise in anglo-american analytical philosophy and continental philosophy. Each of these has its own distinctive set of issues and approaches to resolving them. We also have special expertise in the philosophy of science, and social science, and the history of science and medicine. So at Durham, you will follow one of the widest-ranging philosophy degrees in the country.

At Durham, you will have the opportunity to study Philosophy as a Single Honours degree, or with another subject including: English, Music, Psychology, Politics or Theology. Philosophy can also be combined in a Joint Honours degree within the Natural Sciences course or as part of a Combined Honours degree.

Philosophy is a new subject for many students, so in your first year you will follow a range of introductory courses, introducing the fundamental philosophical subject areas.

Year 1

In their first year, you will take the Philosophy core modules of Ethics and Values, Knowledge and Reality, and Reading Philosophy. The first two of these concern the two broad divisions of Philosophy, into Metaphysics and Theory of Knowledge on the one hand, and Moral Philosophy on the other.

Reading Philosophy is a text-based course which examines in depth classic philosophical works.

You will also take two core modules in Politics, Democratic Political Systems, and Political Theory, and one module from a range of electives. Examples of possible modules include:

  • International Security, Interdependence and Organisation
  • Global Regions in International Relations
  • Introduction to International Relations
  • Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Years 2 and 3

In the second year, you will take Moral Theory and Political Philosophy.

In the second and third years, you will also have a choice of a wide range of topics within Philosophy. In previous years these have included:

  • Moral Theory
  • Modern Philosophy I and II
  • History of Science and Medicine
  • Issues in Contemporary Ethics
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Political Philosophy
  • Metaphysics
  • Language, Logic and Reality
  • Twentieth Century European Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Science
  • The Philosophy of Economics and Politics: Theory, Methods and Values
  • Applied Ethics
  • Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Science
  • History and Philosophy of Psychiatry
  • Biomedical Ethics Past and Present. 

A similarly wide range of modules are available in Politics. In previous years these have included:

  • International Theory
  • The Politics of Pacific Asia
  • Foundations of Western Political Thought
  • Sovereignty, State and Empire
  • Global Political Economy
  • Middle East in the International System
  • Democracy and Democratic Theory
  • Class, Nation and British Politics
  • The Ethics of Violence in International Relations
  • Culture and Conflict in American Politics
  • The New Germany
  • Nations and Nationalism
  • Israel: Politics and Society
  • Evolution and Development of Military Occupation
  • Parties, MPs and Parliamentary Politics in Britain.

You will also have the opportunity to study a subject in depth, by writing a substantial Dissertation of your choice.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year, and will publish finalised core requirements for 2020 entry from September 2019.

Study Abroad

Philosophy

We currently participate in exchange schemes through which you may spend a year of your studies abroad, either with universities in Europe – through the SOCRATES/ERASMUS programme – or with the University of California.

School of Government and International Affairs

Students can apply for a one-year study placement in one of the following institutions: the University of California and Boston College in the USA, British Columbia in Canada, the University of Hong Kong, and the National University of Singapore. In some cases courses are offered in English, while in others teaching is in the local language. We have an ERASMUS/Year Abroad Co-ordinator who will help you prepare for your year abroad, and who will maintain contact with you while you are away.

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

Students on this course learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials (Politics & Philosophy), informal but scheduled one-on-one support, and self-directed learning, such as research, reading, and writing.

All of these are supported by a virtual learning environment, Durham University Online (DUO). Seminars and tutorials are much smaller groups than lectures, with tutorials often involving no more than eight students working with a professor or lecturer; seminars and workshops can be larger but are still small enough to allow one-on-one interaction with tutors; some of these also allow hands-on experience of the kind of work professional political scientists perform.

This emphasis on small-group teaching reflects a conscious choice to enhance the quality of the learning experience rather than the quantity of formal sessions. In fact, the degree is designed to feature fewer formal sessions and more independent research as you move from your first to your final year.

Small-group teaching and one-on-one attention from the personal academic advisor (provided for all students when they enter the course) are part of the learning experience throughout, but by the final year classroom time gives way, to some extent, to independent research, including a capstone dissertation—supported by one-on-one supervision—that makes up a third of final year credits.

In this way the degree systematically transforms the student from a consumer of knowledge in the classroom to a generator of knowledge, ready for professional or postgraduate life. These formal teaching arrangements are supported by “drop-in” surgeries with teaching staff and induction sessions that begin in the week before the start of the course and continue at key times throughout each year of the degree.

You can also attend an extensive programme of research-focused seminars where staff and visiting scholars present their cutting-edge research.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – AAA including at least one social science or humanities subject. Philosophy at AS or A level is not a requirement.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – DDD plus A levels as above.

IB Diploma score – 37 with 666 in higher level subjects. There are also higher level subject requirements.  

  • We consider each application holistically. Whilst academic achievement is important, it is not the only factor that we consider when assessing applications and applicants who have achieved, or are predicted to achieve, close to our typical offer, but who have not met it exactly, will be welcome to apply if they have a strong application in other key elements, for example can demonstrate merit and potential through their personal statement or their reference. 
  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • An interview may form part of the entry requirements for mature students with non-standard qualifications.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

Science A Levels

Applicants taking Science A Levels that include a practical component will be required to take and pass this as a condition of entry. This applies only to applicants sitting A Levels with an English examination board.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

The tuition fees for 2020/21 academic year have not yet been finalised, they will be displayed here once approved.

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Contact Us

T: +44 (0) 191 33 46128

Ask us: www.durham.ac.uk/study/askus