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Department of Mathematical Sciences

News

News

Lectureship in Particle Theory

Job Description

The Department of Mathematical Sciences at Durham University invites applications for a lectureship position in particle theory. The successful candidate will join the internationally leading Centre for Particle Theory, which includes members in both the mathematics and physics departments.


The successful candidate will have an excellent research record in elementary particle theory, string theory, cosmology, or a related area of mathematical and theoretical physics. Candidates with an excellent record of work in string theory, gauge/gravity duality and related areas are particularly encouraged to apply. He or she will be expected to undertake and publish original research of the highest level, to contribute to the research activities of the Centre for Particle Theory and of the department as a whole, and to undertake teaching and administrative duties as assigned by the Head of Department of Mathematical Sciences.

Applications from holders of personal fellowships would be welcome. Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates, who are under-represented in academic posts in the University. The Department supports the LMS Good Practice scheme. For appointment at Lecturer Grade 8 candidates will need to provide evidence of relevant teaching experience at University level and a significant record of publications at international level.

Closing date: 16 May 2014

Contact for informal enquiries: Professor Mukund Rangamani
Telephone: 0191 334 3066
Email: mukund.rangamani@durham.ac.uk

Alternative Contact details: Professor Anne Taormina
Telephone: 0191 334 3059
Email: anne.taormina@durham.ac.uk

Applicants should submit an application through the university's on-line application system, quoting reference 3501.
They should also arrange to have three letters of reference sent directly to the department (preferably by email to maths.office@durham.ac.uk).

(4 Apr 2014)


Lectureship/Senior Lectureship in Particle Theory

Job Description

The Department of Mathematical Sciences at Durham University invites applications for a lectureship or senior lectureship position in particle theory. The successful candidate will join the internationally leading Centre for Particle Theory, which includes members in both the mathematics and physics departments.


The successful candidate will have an excellent research record in elementary particle theory, string theory, cosmology, or a related area of mathematical and theoretical physics. He or she will be expected to undertake and publish original research of the highest level, to contribute to the research activities of the Centre for Particle Theory and of the department as a whole, and to undertake teaching and administrative duties as assigned by the Head of Department of Mathematical Sciences.

Applications from holders of personal fellowships would be welcome. Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates, who are under-represented in academic posts in the University. The Department supports the LMS Good Practice scheme. For appointment at Lecturer Grade 8 candidates will need to provide evidence of relevant teaching experience at University level and a significant record of publications at international level. For appointment at Senior Lecturer candidates will in addition need to have a recognised track record of leadership in research at an international level.

Closing date: 16 May 2014

Contact for informal enquiries: Professor Simon Ross
Telephone: 0191 334 3099
Email: s.f.ross@durham.ac.uk

Alternative Contact details: Professor Anne Taormina
Telephone: 0191 334 3059
Email: anne.taormina@durham.ac.uk

Applicants should submit an application through the university's on-line application system, quoting reference 3499.
They should also arrange to have three letters of reference sent directly to the department (preferably by email to maths.office@durham.ac.uk).

(4 Apr 2014)


Iain MacPhee Memorial Day - 3 April 2014

There will be a day of talks in memory of our former colleague Iain MacPhee on Thursday 3rd April.

The talks will be mostly given by some of Iain's collaborators. All
details are not yet finalized, but there will be at least part of the
day aimed at a general audience, and a reception at the end of the day.
Details will follow.

The Iain MacPhee day follows on from a workshop on "Aspects of Random
Walks" funded by EPSRC and LMS. Some provisional details can be found here.

(13 Feb 2014)


John Hunton is the new Publishing Officer of the LMS

A warm welcome to John Hunton, a topologist who joined our Department with a Professorship in September 2013. He has recently become the new Publications Officer at the London Mathematical Society (LMS). The LMS is one of the oldest international mathematical societies in the world and one of the principal UK Learned Societies speaking for Mathematics. Its main work is to promote Mathematics at all levels, from supporting and publishing research, hosting meetings and lectures, to engaging with the UK government and scientific community on all matters relating to maths education and policy. It receives the funding for its work through its publishing activities, investments and endowments.


From November 2013 John will be managing the publishing activities of the Society and leading the publishing team. The LMS is one of the world's major academic publishers in Mathematics, producing some of the top international research journals including the Proceedings, Transactions, Journal and Bulletin of the LMS, Compositio Mathematica and the Journal of Topology. It currently runs also several book series and co-publishes other journals with bodies including the Institute of Physics and the Russian Academy of Sciences, the latter covering translations of three of the leading Russian Mathematical periodicals.


He will also continue his existing work as a trustee and council member of the LMS, giving input to the general activities and governance of the Society.


Durham has had a long connection with the LMS; current activities running jointly with them include the annual "LMS-EPSRC Durham Symposia" and the "Durham Prospects" meeting, a meeting for undergraduate students thinking about studying for a PhD in Mathematics. Durham will host the LMS Northern Regional meeting in the spring of 2014.

(19 Dec 2013)


Collingwood Lecture 2013 a big hit

Peter Higgs

Professor Peter Higgs, Nobel Prize in Physics 2013, came to Durham University on Tuesday 5th November to deliver the Collingwood Lecture 2013, only weeks after the announcement of his Nobel Prize. This was THE event of the Michaelmas term and more than 500 people attended the event. The largest lecture theatre on the Science site was bursting at its seams, and the lecture was relayed using audio-visual equipment. In the days preceding the event, there was a tangible sense of excitement across the campus and the atmosphere at the lecture was electric.

The lecture, entitled `The electroweak symmetry breaking and the Higgs boson', was delivered in two parts. The first was an excellent introduction to the Higgs mechanism that gives mass to elementary particles given by Professor Steve Abel from Durham. It put in context Peter Higgs's own account of the chronology of scientific ideas in the early sixties that culminated in 1964 with publications by two Belgian physicists, Professors Robert Brout and Francois Englert, and Peter's own work, on the symmetry breaking mechanism and the prediction of a scalar particle, now known as the Higgs boson. The discovery at CERN in 2012 of a particle `consistent with the Higgs boson of the Standard Model' led to the Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 being shared between Francois Englert and Peter Higgs, Robert Brout having passed away in 2011.
Peter also reminded the audience of the important subsequent results obtained by Professor Tom Kibble of Imperial College London, and Professors Gerald Guralnik and Carl Hagen, which are highly relevant in the explanation of the origin of mass.

The audience, ranging from the Vice Chancellor to undergraduates to local sixth formers and members of the general public alike, was captivated by the talks, which offered a glimpse of the dynamics of theoretical physics research processes, and of the awesome experimental effort and ingenuity deployed to confirm theoretical predictions. The younger students in particular, mostly taking A-level Mathematics, Further Mathematics and/or Physics responded enthusiastically to the lectures and were inspired by the energy of the event and, of course, by meeting one of the more unlikely heroes of contemporary culture.

The Collingwood Lecture is an annual event organised by the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Durham. It is organised in memory of Sir Edward Collingwood F.R.S., a mathematician probably known best for his work on the theory of Cluster Sets. He was Chairman of the Council of Durham University from 1955 to his death in 1970. He was knighted in 1962, elected to the Royal Society in 1965 and became President of the London Mathematical Society in 1969. The lectures are given by mathematicians of international renown and are suitable for a general audience.

Some memorable moments of the day have been captured on camera, and we invite you to visit our photo gallery.

(18 Nov 2013)


100th LMS symposium

The theme of the 100th London Mathematical Society-EPSRC Durham Symposium was `Geometric and Cohomological Group Theory'. It was held during the period 12-22 August 2013.

The Durham Symposia are a series of mathematics conferences held annually in Durham under the auspices of the London Mathematical Society and funded by EPSRC (and its predecessors).

In the early 1970s, the London Mathematical Society and the Mathematics Committee of the (then) Science Research Council showed great foresight in seeking to establish a series of world-class research symposia to reflect and enhance the excellence of British mathematics. They chose Durham
as the venue and our first Symposium took place in July 1974. Since then there has been at least one, sometimes two, but more often three, Symposia each year. In August this year we are celebrating the 100th Symposium in this series. Furthermore, we have recently heard that EPSRC will continue funding the Symposia for the next few years.

Each Symposium aims to be timely and internationally leading, bringing together a group of active mathematicians (and other scientists, where appropriate) for about 10 days for a working research symposium, focused on a well-defined and carefully targeted theme of current scientific importance which may be chosen from the entire range of the mathematical sciences. Care is taken to ensure that there is a good balance between
UK and overseas participants, so as to provide maximum benefit to UK science. A number of places are reserved for UK graduate students and other young researchers. We in Durham are very honoured to be the hosts of this series, which has enhanced British and international mathematics since its inception.

More details of symposia past, present and future may be found here.

(8 Jul 2013)


The Maths Bike Ride - 16 June 2013

This is a relatively new departmental initiative, in its third edition this year. The 30-mile ride took the participants out to Seaham and back to the Rose Tree in Shincliffe for a well-deserved drink. Have a look at some snapshots of the 2011 and 2012 bike rides.

(19 Jun 2013)


Gangl style

Herbert Gangl cements his place in Durham maths history with his performance of wrapping up algebraic numbers

(30 May 2013)


Durham Maths and the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences

Professor Patrick Dorey is our principal link with the African Institute for Mathematical Sciences (AIMS). He regularly travels to South Africa and Ghana to deliver basic short courses to enthusiastic and talented students. You can see him in action here, when he demonstrates solitons with the help of some students at Muizenberg, near Cape Town. The AIMS-Ghana Institute is located in the historically significant Central region of Ghana, specifically Biriwa, a small coastal town about 130 km west of Accra, the capital city of Ghana. This is an area of outstanding natural beauty, and AIMS-Ghana offers an intensive one-year taught Masters degree in Mathematical Sciences accredited by the Universities of Ghana and Cape Coast and the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology. There is always scope for a soccer match at the end of a study day.

(30 May 2013)