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Department of Geography

Current Postgraduate Students

Miss Elizabeth Richardson

Research Postgraduate (PhD) in the Department of Geography
Telephone: 41815 / 41817
Fax: +44 (0) 191 33 41801
Room number: 601

Contact Miss Elizabeth Richardson (email at e.c.i.richardson@durham.ac.uk)

Biography

2006 - 2009 BA Hons Geography, Cambridge.
2009 - 2010 MA Geography (Research Methods), Durham University.
2010 - present PhD candidate.

Research

My research considers the social and political role of culture. I am interested in how processes of representation are contested and break down but simultaneously remain in creation and circulation, shaping the social world. My PhD research has developed this cultural politics of creativity through a focus on performance of spoken word, theatre and carnival in the city of Bristol. Three concerns have evolved from this:

Performing multiculturalism: living with difference has been framed as a process of cultural integration. Culture has been used to subsume categories such as race, foreclosing anti-racist politics. I am interested in the resonances and dissonances of imperial pasts in everyday multiculture that continue to lend weight to race as a force of opportunity and/or constraint.

Critical creative cities: I am interested in how creative practices take place in and through urban space. Creative activity is often temporary and fragile, rather than fixed and durable. This transient nature means that both the participation in and the products of the ‘creative city’ must be rethought.

Politics of community: community continues to be invoked, lending it some solidity, yet the lines on which such collectives are drawn are increasingly incoherent. My interest lies in how community is an inconstant achievement, often an appearance of stability that is a distribution or appropriation of sensibilities. The attachments of belonging are precarious, meaning community emerges as both solid and fragile, deliberate and contingent.

Is supervised by

Selected Publications

Books: reviews

Journal papers: academic

Show all publications