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Department of Archaeology

Staff

Dr Mandy Jay

Research Associate in the Department of Archaeology

Biography

Mandy Jay is a postdoctoral researcher working on the AHRC funded project entitled 'The Beaker isotope project: mobility, migration and diet in the British Early Bronze Age'. This is a collaborative research programme between investigators at the Universities of Durham and Sheffield (http://www.shef.ac.uk/archaeology/research/beaker-isotope). Prior to this, she was employed as a research assistant engaged in the isotopic analysis of skeletal material for the Leverhulme funded Ancient Human Occupation of Britain (AHOB) project until late in 2005, when she took her current position.

Her PhD, from the University of Bradford, was completed in 2005 and related to the carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of archaeological bone collagen from British Iron Age sites for the purpose of dietary reconstruction. She has been interested in the use of isotopic data from skeletal material as a technique for answering archaeological questions about diet, environment and mobility since taking her first degree in Archaeology (also at the University of Bradford), her undergraduate dissertation being designed to provide a background in this by looking for variation in contemporary herbivore carbon and nitrogen values from various locations across Britain. She is particularly interested in the levels of variation in such isotopic values which have been caused by environmental background. Such variation can be caused by both geographical differences and temporal changes in local environment and is often best studied empirically by looking at archaeological animal bone. She is also interested in the ways in which the carbon and nitrogen data can be combined with other isotopic data (sulphur from collagen, oxygen and strontium from tooth enamel) to investigate mobility patterns.

Selected Publications

Articles: magazine

Books: sections

Journal papers: academic

Journal papers: online

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