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Durham Law: Policy Engagement

News and Events

NOVEMBER 2018: LESSONS ON LABOUR REGULATION FROM THE GLOBAL SOUTH – THE CONVERSATION

An article in The Conversation by Professor Deirdre McCann asks what lessons can be learned from the Project on Unacceptable Forms of Work for regulation of the gig economy and forced labour in high-income countries.

The article draws on the Project research agendas to call for lessons to be learned from the global South on combatting unacceptable work.

The article highlights:

- Preliminary findings from the Decent Work Regulation in Africa project that work/family issues are a pressing concern for many workers in the garment sector in Southern Africa;

- Lessons from Brazil on the effective regulation of forced labour;

- A model from India on head-load work that can be drawn on to inspire law reforms in high-income countries to protect workers in the ‘gig economy.’

The study ‘Unacceptable Forms of Work: Global Dialogue/Local Innovation’ is available here.

The Conversation is the leading independent source of news and views from the academic and research community for use by the wider public.


OCTOBER 2018: DWR-AFRICA WELCOMES THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF LESOTHO AS A NEW PARTNER

DWR-Africa is delighted to welcome a new partner – the National University of Lesotho in Roma, Lesotho.

This collaboration will be led by Dr Regina Kulehile, Head of the Department of Public Law, Faculty of Law. Dr Kulehile’s research interests are diverse and include aspects of the regulation of the informal economy in Lesotho, and the barriers to economic development in Lesotho, including the regulatory framework for electronic commerce, which was the focus of her PhD study.

We are looking forward to a fruitful collaboration with Dr Kulehile in working together with DWR-Africa’s stakeholder partners in Lesotho to build capacity to improve working conditions in Lesotho, with an initial focus on work in the garment sector.


OCTOBER 2018: SUBMISSION ON DECENT WORK REGULATION FOR THE UK VISIT OF THE UN SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON EXTREME POVERTY AND HUMAN RIGHTS (5-16 November 2018)

A submission for the forthcoming vist to the UK of the United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights (5 to 16 November 2018) has highlighted the intersection of poverty and labour rights and the need for effective labour regulation in the UK.

The submission - by Professor Deirdre McCann of Durham Law School, Principal Investigator of the Decent Work Regulation project - responds to the Special Rapporteur’s interest in how poverty in the UK intersects with economic and social rights issues.

For further information on the submission, click here.


SEPTEMBER 2018: DWR-AFRICA LESOTHO TRADE UNIONS WORKSHOP

On 28 September, Decent Work Regulation in Africa (DWR-Africa) project team members Ms Ithabeleng Duma (Lesotho Research Lead, Maseru) and Professor Debbie Collier (University of Cape Town) organised the DWR-Africa Lesotho Trade Unions Workshop in Maseru.

The event brought together representatives of the project’s key local union partners, from UNITE, IDUL, NACTWU, and LENTSOE LA SECHABA. The workshop discussed the objectives of the DWR-Africa project and how they relate to the priorities and aims of trade unions and workers in Lesotho. The local stakeholders shared their perspectives on recent developments in the garment industry. The participants also considered potential future activities that could combine the needs and priorities of the academic community and stakeholders.

The workshop established common ground towards improved collaboration between research and union partners in Lesotho. It inaugurated a dialogue that is expected to continue in a series of regular meetings to share ideas and experience of labour regulation in Lesotho.

The event is part of a broader series of research/stakeholder activities during 2018 that are centred on working conditions in Lesotho.


AUGUST 2018: CALL FOR APPLICATIONS FOR A FULLY-FUNDED PHD STUDENTSHIP

Closing date: 31 August 2018

Applications are now open for a fully-funded PhD Studentship on Law's Dynamic Effects in South Africa.

The studentship is funded through Durham University's new Global Challenges Research Fund Centre for Doctoral Training.

The doctoral project will be supervised by Professor Deirdre McCann at Durham Law School together with Professor John Linarelli and in partnership with the University of Cape Town.

The studentship is fully funded for three years from February 2019. It covers full payment of fees; a tax-free maintenance grant of £14,777 per year; return travel and visa costs; an allowance to cover research costs and resarch training; and support for an overseas placement.

Funding is available to an overseas candidate based in an OECD DAC list country. Applicants should have an academic background in a relevant subject e.g. law, sociology, geography, industrial relations, social policy) and training or experience in quantitative or qualitative research methods.

Por further details, please click here.

Enquiries are welcome to Professor Deirdre McCann (deirdre.mccann@durham.ac.uk).


JULY 2018: GLOBAL CHALLENGES SUMMIT

Newcastle University, 24 July 2018

Professor Deirdre McCann spoke about her research on global labour rights at the Global Challenges Summit 2018, held in Newcastle University on 24 July.

Hosted by Durham, Newcastle and Northumbria Universities, the Summit brought together participants from across the world including Herman Mashaba, the Mayor of Johannesburg, Salha Kaitesi, Founder of Beauty of Rwanda, and Peter White, COO of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.

Professor McCann called for workers’ rights to be placed at the heart of sustainable development and of efforts to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals. She presented a new study by the ESRC/GCRF Network that she leads on Legal Regulation of Unacceptable Forms of Work and her recent work in Southern Africa.

The study Unacceptable Forms of Work: Global Dialogue/Local Innovation is available here. It was featured in an article in the Northern Echo.


JULY 2018: UFW REPORT 2018

Unacceptable Forms of Work: Global Dialogue/Local Innovation

This report is the product of an international consultation that has involved researchers and policy-makers from 50 research and policy organisations in more than 20 countries across the world. A response to the UN Sustainable Development Goals, the report calls for effective labour regulation to secure economic growth and decent work (SDG8).

Unacceptable Forms of Work: Global Dialogue/Local Innovation highlights 10 Global Challenges to effective labour rights. It outlines research agendas that are designed to investigate and respond to each of these Global Challenges by eliminating Unacceptable Forms of Work(UFW).

For further information about the report, please click here.


JUNE 2018: FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE REGIONAL MEETING ON DECENT WORK REGULATION IN AFRICA

University of Cape Town, Graduate School of Business, 18 June 2018

On 18 June 2018, the Network held a Regional Meeting at the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business. The Meeting brought together stakeholders from countries across sub-Saharan Africa, including from government Ministries, labour inspectorates, trade unions, employers’ associations, auditors, and retailers.

The Meeting provided the opportunity for a regional dialogue on regulatory strategies that can achieve decent work in the African context. The focus was on the enforcement of labour laws in the garment sector. In particular, participants considered whether involving a range of stakeholders in enforcement - multistakeholders models - can extend the reach of labour standards.

This document outlines the Meeting’s findings and recommendations. It aims to make a useful contribution to the lively debates on effective labour standards, and on decent work in the garment sector, both in Africa and in countries across the world.

To download the document, please click here.


JUNE 2018: REGIONAL MEETING ON DECENT WORK REGULATION IN AFRICA

Decent Work Regulation in Africa aims at establishing a Regional Network of researchers and policy-makers who have an interest in effective labour regulation.

A Regional Meeting of this project was held at the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business on 18 June 2018 to bring together participants from the region and international partners. The aim of this meeting was to provide the opportunity for regional and international dialogue on legal strategies that can achieve decent work in Africa, with a particular focus on the garment sector.

For further information about the event, please click here.


APRIL 2018: UFW PROJECT RESEARCH AGENDAS

The ESRC/GCRF Strategic Network on Legal Regulation of Unacceptable Forms of Work has identifed a set of Global Challenges to effective labour regulation. These are the most urgent and complex issues that face lower-income countries in particular in upgrading or eliminating unacceptable forms of work.

Network Teams composed of researchers from a range of discplines and national and international policy actors have produced research agendas to address each Global Challenge.

To download the research agendas, click here.


DECEMBER 2017: WORKSHOP ON GLOBAL CHALLENGES TO EFFECTIVE LABOUR RIGHTS AT DURHAM LAW SCHOOL

A Workshop on Global Challenges to Effective Labour Rights was held at Durham Law School on 8 December 2017. The event gathered researchers and policy-makers from Canada, Lesotho, South Africa, the UK, and the US.

For more information about the event, please click here.


AUGUST & SEPTEMBER 2017: GLOBAL DIALOGUE / LOCAL INNOVATION CONFERENCES: BANGKOK & DURHAM

The ‘Global Dialogue/Local Innovation’ conferences, held in Bangkok and Durham, hosted researchers, policymakers and union members representing a diverse range of nations, including Australia, Korea, Brazil, South Africa, Lesotho, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Cambodia, and the UK. More information here.


JUNE 2017: UNACCEPTABLE FORMS OF WORK: A MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODEL

Unacceptable forms of work (UFW) have been identified as an “area of critical importance” for the ILO as it approaches its centenary. Yet there is currently no comprehensive elaboration of the dimensions, causes or manifestations of UFW.

On this article published in the International Labour Review (Vol. 156, No. 2, 2017), Professor Deirdre McCann and Professor Judy Fudge report on a research project that has proposed such a framework.

The article first investigates and reconceptualizes key discourses on contemporary work to identify their contribution to an analytically rigorous conception of UFW. It then outlines a novel Multidimensional Model that has been designed for use by local policy actors in identifying and targeting UFW in countries across a range of income levels.

To download the article, please click here.


FEBRUARY 2016: ELIMINATING UNACCEPTABLE FORMS OF WORK: A GLOBAL CHALLENGE


In this post on social protection and human rights, Professor Deirdre McCann outlines social protection as one of the dimensions of the Multidimensional Model of Unacceptable Forms of Work.



Image: St├ęphane Pecorini

JULY 2015: ADDRESSING THE COMPLEX REALITIES OF POST-CRISIS EMPLOYMENT


Following the Regulating for Decent Work conference held at the International Labour Organisation in Geneva (8-10 July 2016), Deirdre McCann comments on the need for robust labour regulation to help deliver decent work.

Read the comment here.


Haitian Domestic Work (Image: Alex Proimos)

JULY 2015: A GLOBAL DIALOGUE (DURHAM/GENEVA)


Researchers and policy-makers from around the world met in July 2015 to share innovative ways in which Unacceptable Forms of Work are being addressed

Workshops were held in Durham and at the ILO in Geneva, at a Special Session of the Regulating for Decent Work Conference.



2015: UNACCEPTABLE FORMS OF WORK: A GLOBAL AND COMPARATIVE STUDY

This research study conducted by Professor Judy Fudge and Professor Deirdre McCann defines Unacceptable Forms of Work (UFW) and the various ways in which it is manifested.

It compares the concept of UFW to relevant concepts developed by academia and selected international organizations. It also proposes a model to capture the multidimensional nature of unacceptable forms of work in different socio-economic and cultural contexts, and suggests effective approaches to labour market regulation in addressing these forms of work.

Unacceptable Forms of Work: A Global and Comparative Study (English)

Unacceptable Forms of Work: A Global and Comparative Study (French)

Unacceptable Forms of Work: A Global and Comparative Study (Spanish)