Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Institute of Advanced Study

Past Events

Cosin

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture: The Aqueducts of Ancient Rome - The Eighth Wonder of the Ancient World

12th November 2009, 20:00 to 21:00, Collingwood College, Professor Christer Bruun (University of Toronto)

The level of technology and organizational skills of the Romans was such that their capital, Rome, benefited from a more abundant supply of fresh water than any city of the western world before the 20th century. How did they do it? Were there any conflicts over water use?
Did everyone have equal access to the water? How did the Roman public baths function? What were the effects on the environment? What about poisoning from the lead conduits? To what extent have later ages been influenced by the Romans? This lecture will discuss these questions and more...

Professor Christer Bruun is an historian of the ancient Roman world at the University of Toronto. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Study and Collingwood College between October and December 2009.

Christer has published widely on questions relating to the social, cultural and administrative history of both the Roman Republic and the Roman imperial period. He has published or edited five books and some seventy articles in English, German or Italian, besides a dozen articles in Swedish or Finnish, and some sixty book reviews, and he has been a columnist in Hufvudstadsbladet, the largest Swedish daily in Finland, since 1998.

His fields of expertise include Ancient water supply, Roman government, Roman epigraphy (he is currently co-editing, with J.C. Edmondson, the Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy), the topography of Rome, and generally questions of Roman culture and society. He has also published on questions in medieval history (naming practices, water supply), in Renaissance history (the reception of Frontinus and water administration in Rome of the XV-XVII centuries), and in more recent history (the diaries of J.W. von Goethe, Classical studies in Odessa), or even relating to his own times (the rise of the Finnish radical youth movement in the 1970s, (in Swedish)).

IAS PUBLIC LECTURES ARE FREE TO ATTEND AND OPEN TO ALL. PLACES ARE ON A FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED BASIS.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

Related Links