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Durham University

Human Resources & Organisational Development

Gender Pay Gap

Gender Pay Gap reporting

As a University, we are embedding equality, diversity and inclusion into everything we do. Our staff are key to our success.

In line with the UK Government policy and along with other universities and businesses with 250 or more employees, we have published our gender pay gap data for the year ending 31 March 2019.

We want to emphasise that the gender pay gap is not about equal pay – men and women doing the same job at Durham University are paid the same amount. Rather, the gender pay gap is the percentage difference between the average hourly earnings for men and for women.

Our gender pay gap for the year to 31 March 2019, including staff on casual contracts, is 23.6%, a reduction from 23.77% in 2018 and 25.35% in 2017. Despite improvement, it still reflects the fact that we have more men than women in higher paid roles.

Our report also considers staff bonuses. Our bonus pay gap for the year to 31 March 2019 was 62.9%. Though this was an increase on 2018, bonuses were received by only around 2% of our staff and these payments include Royal Society Awards, Academic Merit Awards and all Discretionary Awards.

We recognise that the gender pay gap is a serious issue for Durham University, as it is for the Higher Education sector and society as a whole. We are addressing this through a comprehensive action plan, approved by the University Executive, Remuneration Committee and University Council.

The action plan can be summarised as follows:

  • Better recruitment: better recruitment materials, effective use of search committees and targeted advertising, gender balance (as is practicable) on selection panels and more and better training for chairs and members of recruitment panels;
  • Better development: better leadership and management training, including the women-only leadership programme Aurora, and effective use of networking groups;
  • Better rewards: continued working on use of casual working arrangements, increasing the number of staff considered for rewards, offering annual CV checks and monitoring promotions by grade and gender;
  • Better employment conditions: promotion of flexible working, developing a Wellbeing Strategy for staff and reviewing traditionally gendered roles with a view to removing obstacles and encouraging more applications.

Further details on our gender pay gap data and action plan are available on these web pages. If you have comments or suggestions, please email the Reward Team at reward.team@durham.ac.uk in the first instance.

Professor Stuart Corbridge
Vice-Chancellor and Warden

Professor Antony Long
Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Provost

What is the gender pay gap?

The gender pay gap is different to equal pay. That the University has a gender pay gap, does not mean that it is paying people different rates for work of equal value. Gender pay can be about structural issues such as having a disproportionate number of staff of one gender at one grade e.g. more men at the top grade or more women in the bottom grade.

More information can be found via the links below:

What is the gender pay gap?

The difference between equal pay and gender pay

What are we doing about it?

The action plan for the University can be found via the link below:

The action plan

We recognise that the gender pay gap is a serious issue for Durham University, as it is for the Higher Education Sector and society as a whole. Our Gender Pay Gap Action Plan sets out the actions we are taking to reduce the gender pay gap in the University.

The University’s Pay Gap Action Plan details a number of initiatives and key performance indicators both ongoing and planned which seek to address the issues identified by the GPG analysis. The Pay Working Group chaired by the Deputy VC and Provost will monitor progress against the Action Plan will further investigate other ways in which the University can close its Gender Pay Gap. The outcomes will be reported publically and to Council annually, as well as more regularly as considered helpful by the group.

The University’s Gender Pay Gap Action Plan emphasises the following key objectives:

  • To improve and widen the evaluation of pay, taking into account data on wider protected characteristics.
  • Support gender-balanced progression.
  • Continue to ensure fair and transparent recruitment and selection practices ensuring recruitment opportunities are attractive to both men and women, gender balanced panels and contextualised decision-making at all levels.
  • Enhance development opportunities to support all staff in their career progression
  • Improve the distribution of staff considered and awarded for their contribution to the university

We have also provided an update in line with the recent UCEA proposals which is available here:

UCEA proposals

Where are we at?

In line with the UK Government policy and along with other universities and businesses with 250 or more employees, we have prepared our gender pay gap data for 2019.

The table below provides the outcomes of the University’s Gender Pay Gap reporting for the past three years.

Gender Pay Gap - the difference in hourly rates of pay between male and female employees:

In line with findings from out biannual equal pay audits and from the 2019 Gender Pay Gap (GPG) analysis it is clear that the pay gap derives from an under representation of females at the highest level of the organisation and an overrepresentation of females in the lower levels. It is important to reiterate that this does not mean that female staff are paid differently to their male counterparts for like work.

The mean hourly rate for males is £19.77 compared to the average female hourly rate of £15.10. The University’s mean gender pay gap for 2019 is 23.6% compared to 23.8% in 2018.

The median hourly rate for males is £17.22 compared to the median female hourly rate of £12.41. The University’s median gender pay gap for 2019 is 27.9%, so remains the same as it was for 2018.

The links below provides more detailed information:

Gender pay gap background information

Distribution of the workforce

Gender pay gap by grade

More information on the work the University is undertaking around specific areas and the current position can be found via the links below:

Recruitment

Contracted and casual staff

Progression

Bonus pay

Our commitments

As a University, we are embedding equality, diversity and inclusion in everything we do. Our staff are key to our success.

We recognise that the gender pay gap is a serious issue for Durham University, as it is for the Higher Education Sector and society as a whole. We are addressing this through our comprehensive action plan, approved by the University Executive, Remuneration Committee and University Council.

Achieving gender balance is an important goal for Durham University and one that has strategic significance. While the University acknowledges that it will take time to achieve a gender balance across all levels within the organisation there are already a number of initiatives in place, and improvements have been made and as an organisation, we are committed to continue to build on this.

Our gender pay gap reporting over the last three years has shown that there are more men than women in higher paid roles, and more women than men in lower paid roles. However, the University is committed to challenging these profiles through its programmes such as Athena Swan, which focuses on the recruitment, retention and progression of an increasingly diverse workforce. Development activities such as our academic senior leadership programme (recent cohort 57% female) and future leader’s programme (75% female) are supporting this change. Furthermore, there has been significant engagement with and investment in the Aurora programme with 31 staff members across academic and PS being supported this year.

It is encouraging to see positive outcomes resulting from the full range of activities. However, the University recognises that there is still more that is needed if we are to reduce the gender pay gap to an acceptable level.

It will take time to achieve a gender balance. Our intention over the next five years is to continue our work to equalise the representation of men and women across the spectrum of different job grades and thereby reduce our gender pay gap further. We will continue to work collaboratively across the organisation to deliver on this important agenda.

We will remove the real and perceived barriers to help all our staff to thrive. We will monitor and improve the gender balance of those attending development programmes. We will increase the number of female applicants for Academic and PS senior roles through, succession- planning, external advertising and targeted recruitment and we will ensure parity of pay and reward across of staff categories genders and grades.