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Durham University

Durham Energy Institute

News

Andy Aplin quoted on air pollution found around oil and gas wells in the US in Telegraph and Independent.

(31 October 2014)

On Thursday 30 October the journal Environmental Health reported that dangerously high levels of cancer-causing chemicals have been discovered in the air around “fracking” sites in the United States. The study was led by David Carpenter from the University at Albany in New York. Prof Andrew Aplin responded through the Science Media Centre.

The Professor of Unconventional Petroleum at Durham University, said:

“Whilst pollutants such as benzene and toluene occur in the atmosphere of every urban environment, this study shows that very high concentrations of hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulphide were found in the very local vicinity of some specific oil and gas operations in the US.

 

 “Poor industrial practice and insufficient regulation can of course result in locally elevated concentrations of atmospheric pollutants in many urban and industrial situations - this is why the UK passed the Clean Air Act in 1956. Industrial emissions are tightly regulated in the UK and these regulations currently apply to those who have been producing conventional oil and gas in the UK for many years. The same rules will apply to any future producers of shale gas and it is incumbent upon us to make sure that the same rules are followed and enforced.”

 

Read the coverage of the story quoting Prof Aplin in the:

 

Independent

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/dangerously-high-levels-of-airborne-carcinogens-found-at-us-fracking-sites-9826586.html

 

Telegraph

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/energy/fracking/11196238/Fracking-emits-more-formaldehyde-than-medical-students-experience-from-dead-bodies.html

 

Professor Andy Aplin is a member of DEI’s Energy Policy Group which consists of energy experts from across Durham University who comment on energy policy issues in the media and are developing briefings for policy makers on key topical energy issues.