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Durham University

Centre for Vision and Visual Cognition

Seminars

Friday 1 February 2019

Prof. Marina Bloj

CVVC seminar: Remembering object colours

3:00pm, L48, Prof. Marina Bloj

Prof. Marina Bloj from University of Bradford is giving the CVVC/psychology seminar on Friday, February 1st at 3 pm. The title of her talk is Remembering object colours.

Contact maria.olkkonen@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 10 February 2017

Prof. Andrew Welchman (Cambridge) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Prof. Andrew Welchman

On seeing what's not there.


Friday 3 February 2017

Prof. Brigitte Röder (Hamburg) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Prof. Brigitte Röder

Cross-modal factors in sight-recovery.


Friday 18 November 2016

Prof. Gordon Love & Dr. Laura Young (Durham & Oxford) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Prof. Gordon Love & Dr. Laura Young

Adaptive optics and retinal imaging.


Friday 11 November 2016

Dr. Christoph Witzel (Paris, Descartes) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Dr. Christoph Witzel

Color naming, unique hues, and sensory singularities.


Friday 4 November 2016

Dr. Tim Smith (Birkbeck) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Dr. Tim Smith

The role of color in search templates for real-world target objects.


Wednesday 8 June 2016

Prof. Max Di Luca (Birmingham) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Prof. Max Di Luca

Optimal Perceived Timing: Integrating Sensory Information with Dynamically Updated Expectations.


Friday 4 March 2016

Prof. Marc Ernst (Ulm) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Prof. Marc Ernst

Statistically optimal multisensory cue integration.


Friday 29 January 2016

Prof. Danielle Ropar (Nottingham) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Prof. Danielle Ropar

Cognitive Mechanisms underlying visual perspective taking in typical and ASC children.


Saturday 14 November 2015

Dr. Gavin Buckingham (Heriot-Watt), CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Dr. Gavin Buckingham

Perceiving and acting upon weight illusions.


Saturday 24 October 2015

Prof. Larry Maloney (NYU) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept.

Movement planning under risk.


Wednesday 25 February 2015

Prof. Roland Fleming (Giessen) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L47 Psychology Dept., Prof. Roland Fleming

Cues to the perception of gloss and texture.


Wednesday 28 January 2015

Prof. Jan Atkinson & Prof. Oliver Braddick (UCL & Oxford) CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L50 Psychology Department, Prof. Jan Atkinson & Prof. Oliver Braddick

Visual control of manual actions: brain mechanisms in typical development and developmental disorders.


Wednesday 26 November 2014

Grasping in the real world: choosing goals and avoiding obstacles

Calman Learning Centre, Professor Mel Goodale, Western University, Canada

Contact a.d.milner@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Saturday 22 November 2014

Why do things look as they do? The contribution of primary visual cortex to size perception

L47, Department of Psychology, Dr Irene Sperandio, Lecturer, University of East Anglia, England

Contact cristiana.cavina-pratesi@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Saturday 8 November 2014

Perception of Emotional Body Expressions Used in Narrative Scenarios

L47, Department of Psychology, Ekaterina Volkova, PhD student, Max Plank Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany

Contact a.p.atkinson@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 23 May 2014

Professor Catherine Tallon-Baudry, Ecole Normale Supérieure Département d'Études Cognitives, France.

Friday 11 April 2014

Dr Gaving Buckingam, School of Life Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh

Friday 21 March 2014

Professor Armin Kibele, Kassel University, Germany

Friday 17 January 2014

Professor Uta Noppley, Birmingham University, England

Friday 25 October 2013

Prof. David Perrett CVVC Seminar

5:00pm, L50 Psychology Department, Prof. David Perrett

Colour cues to health and facial attractiveness.


Friday 31 May 2013

Is the primary visual cortex modulated by visual awareness?

L47, Psychology Department, Dr Masataka Watanabe, Max Planck Institute, Tubingen, in Germany

Contact j.w.r.schultz@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 12 April 2013

An overview of multivariate pattern analysis of fMRI data

L47, Psychology Department, Dr Nick Oosterhof, research fellow at the CIMeC (University of Trento, IT) and at the Dartmouth College, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, NH, USA

Contact cristiana.cavina-pratesi@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 22 March 2013

Cognitive, Sensory, and Motor Functions of the Posterior Parietal Cortex

L47, Psychology Department, Dr Flavia Filimon from the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences at the University College London, London

Contact cristiana.cavina-pratesi@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 22 February 2013

How small can we go? High-resolution fMRI of human visual and somatosensory cortex

12:20pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr Denis Schluppeck, Nottingham University

Contact j.d.connolly@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 30 November 2012

Grasping in the real world: choosing goals and avoiding obstacles

1:30pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr Simon Grant, Optometry & Visual Science, City University London

Contact cristiana.cavina-pratesi@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 25 May 2012

'Task-specific cortical activity becomes more stable when its information content becomes conscious'

4:30pm, L47, Dr Aaron Schurger

Aaron did his Ph.D. with Professor  Ann Triesman and Professor Jonathan Cohen in Princeton and he is currently in Professor Stan Dehaene's lab in Paris.

Aaron is hosted by Dr Bob Kentridge (robert.kentridge@durham.ac.uk), therefore get in touch with Bob if you would like to meet and chat with Aaron.



Contact daniel.smith@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 9 March 2012

Evolutionary Psychology

4:30pm, L47, Psychology Department, Miss Milena Dzhelyova (former Durham MSc student) St Andrew University

A public Seminar from the Centre for Vision and Visual Cognition.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 24 February 2012

information processing in the visual system

4:30pm, L47, Psychology Department, Prof. Karl R. Gegenfurtner, Justus Liebig University Giessen

A public seminar from the Centre for Vision and Visual Cognition.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 27 January 2012

Skin colour and texture – signals of health and mate quality

4:30pm, L47, Psychology Department, Mr Ross Whitehead (former Durham MSc student) & Miss Carmen Lefevre (former Durham UG student) , St Andrews University

A public seminar from the Centre for Vision and Visual Cognition.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 2 December 2011

Human Echolocation

4:30pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr Lore Thaler, Durham University

A public seminar from the Centre for Vision and Visual Cognition

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 18 November 2011

Integration of visual and auditory information

4:30pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr Quoc Vuong & Dr Adrian Rees, Newcastle University

A public seminar from the Centre for Vision and Visual Cognition.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 4 November 2011

Social inhibition of return: When Fred’s attention affects Joe’s performance

4:30pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr Paul Skarrat, Hull University

A public seminar from the Centre for Vision and Visual Cognition.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 17 June 2011

Cross-sensory correspondences: Why lemons are fast and high-pitched, intelligent people are quick, bright, and sharp, and toads lower the pitch of their croak to get sex?

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr. Peter Walker (Lancaster University)

Hidden within the idiosyncratic experiences reported by synaesthetes is a set of shared cross-sensory correspondences linking different dimensions of perceptual experience (e.g., brightness, size, weight, hardness, height, sharpness). In visual-hearing synaesthesia, for example, higher-pitched sounds tend to induce smaller and brighter visual images, and in visual-pain synaesthesia sharp pains are bright. The same correspondences have now been observed in those of us who are not synaesthetes, where their impact is proving to be pervasive and pronounced. The nature of the correspondences and how they impact on our behaviour is explored. But where does our sensitivity to the correspondences originate? Does it reflect an innate predisposition, or is it learned through exposure to language (e.g., the fact that light refers both to visual brightness and lightness in weight) and/or natural co-occurrences among perceptual features? The fact that 3-month-old infants are sensitive to two such correspondences raises the intriguing possibility that they reflect innate predispositions. 

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 10 June 2011

Eye Movements and Stable Perception

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr. Amelia Hunt (University of Aberdeen)

Although we experience a stable visual world, the retina is in almost constant motion as our eyes move around. I will describe three lines of research that shed light on how the process of anticipating sensory consequences of eye movements can contribute to perceived stability. First, I will show that a visual mask placed in the expected retinotopic location of a target just before an eye movement can interfere with target identification. Second, I will describe results from a hemianopic patient whose sensitivity to a dim stimulus shown after an eye movement in his sighted field is enhanced by the presence of a blind-field stimulus shown in the same spatial location before the eye movement. Third, I will demonstrate that the experience of a shift in gaze direction precedes the actual eye movement. Together these findings suggest that we are able to use information about an impending eye movement to shift our attention to the anticipated retinotopic location of relevant information.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 11 May 2011

Investigating bilateral damage in the human visual system

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr. Holly Bridge (Oxford University)

It is fortunate that the majority of damage that occurs in the post-chiasmatic human visual system is limited to one hemisphere. The effects on perception are therefore restricted to one half of the visual field. However, in rare cases damage occurs bilaterally causing loss across the entire visual field. In this talk I will present the case of Patient SBR who suffered bilateral damage to the grey matter of primary visual cortex (V1). Using a variety of methods, I will show an analysis of the residual function and anatomical changes resulting from this damage.  In a further experiment, we have considered the effect of bilateral V1 absence on visual mental imagery.

Finally, I will present some recent results from the famous agnosic patient DF, who has bilateral damage to the lateral occipital cortex. Using a variety of approaches, we have tried to fully characterise the patterns of visual loss, and the structural changes underlying this loss.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 9 March 2011

Contribution of Acetylcholine and NMDA receptors to attentional modulation in V1

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr. Jose Herrero (Institute of Neuroscience at the University of Newcastle)

Directing attention towards a location in the visual field can improve the perception of the incoming stimuli. The neuronal signatures underlying this attention effect are well known, as many studies have reported larger firing rates in single neurons in various visual cortical areas [1, 2], along with changes in oscillatory activity patterns [3, 4]. In contrast, the cellular and pharmacological mechanisms underlying attentional modulation are not well understood. In this talk I will describe some of these mechanisms, focusing on the cholinergic and glutamatergic systems. I will describe a recent study from our lab [5] that demonstrated cholinergic mechanisms to play a crucial role. I will also present some new data that shows that glutamatergic-NMDA receptors may also contribute to attentional modulation in V1, but in a different manner than acetylcholine. This latter finding is in line with the assumption that attention is implemented through top-down feedback from higher cortical areas, and suggests that feedback selectively recruits NMDA receptor-rich synapses in V1.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 16 February 2011

Object Based Attention. What are the objects that influence attention? How are they represented, and what role might their influence upon attention play in perception?

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr. Lee de-Wit (University of Leuven)

It is probably an inevitable consequence of cognitive dissonance that one has to come to the belief that the topic investigated in ones PhD was an important one. In line with this I've come to the conclusion that 'object-based attention' (the fact that objects influence the allocation of visual processing resources) may indeed play a critical role in the way in which the visual system develops object representations. More specifically I am going to argue that the some of the characteristics of the manner in which the visual system represents the objects that influence attention enables this process to play a key role in the object invariance learning processes recently outlined by James DiCarlo (see Cox, et al, 2005, Nat Neuro). In particular I think the fact that potential object representations are maintained in parallel across a visual scene, and the fact that these objects seem to be based on the extent to which stimuli form a 'good gestalt' rather than a meaningful object enables 'object-based attention' to act as a sort of 'gate-keeper' to the development of view/position/size invariant object representations. I will present some demo experimental ideas with which I hope to test this idea in the coming months.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 19 January 2011

Mapping the role of culture and race in processing faces

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr. Roberto Caldara (University of Fribourg, Switzerland)

Human beings living in different geographical locations can be categorized by culture and race. The term culture is typically used to describe the particular behaviors and beliefs that characterize a social or ethnic group. Culture and social experience are responsible for shaping the way people think and behave, but they also critically impact on the way people decode and transmit social signals from faces. I will present eye movement studies challenging the view that the biologically-relevant face recognition and categorization of facial expression of emotion tasks are universally achieved across human beings. Race is a universal, socially constructed concept used to categorize humans originating from different geographical locations by salient physiognomic variations (i.e., skin tone, eye shape, etc.). I will then present electrophysiological studies showing a very early extraction of race information from faces and the impact of this visual categorization on face processing. Altogether, our data show that culture and race are important factors shaping human behaviour and social interactions.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 8 December 2010

Development of visual and multisensory cue integration for uncertainty reduction

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr Marko Nardini (The Institute of Ophthalmology, UCL)

Sensory information is uncertain. Two means of reducing uncertainty are integrating multiple estimates (e.g. vision and touch), and interpreting present information in light of prior knowledge (e.g. assuming a light from above to interpret shape-from-shading). Human adults use such strategies to reduce the uncertainty in their sensory estimates of physical properties. I will describe some recent studies of how these abilities develop in childhood. Overall, children's performance differs markedly from adults'. Children do not integrate two cues to reduce uncertainty until after 8 years, whether across modalities or within a single modality. However, keeping cues separate enables younger children to make discriminations about conflicting cues that are not available to adults. In interpreting shape-from-shading, children use similar "convexity" and "light-from-above" prior assumptions to adults, but give different weightings to these. The differences in integration behaviour suggest that developing perceptual systems are optimized for goals other than uncertainty reduction, while the differences in use of prior knowledge may reflect the differing time courses for acquiring statistics about different aspects of the visual world.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 19 November 2010

Dissociating experience and sensation: The Case of Visual Imagery and Visual Suppression

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Elena Broggin (University of Verona, Italy)

Visual perception consists of two key components: information analysis and subjective awareness. Behind this apparently simple process of "seeing", there are complex neural mechanisms involved that are not completely understood. I am presenting some behavioural experiments to cast further light on two cases in which visual experience and visual sensation are dissociated: visual imagery and visual suppression. In the first part of the talk I am going to speak about the case of visual imagery and whether it involves similar neural mechanism as visual perception. In 4 different experiments we manipulated visual features that classically influence the RTs in early (luminance, contrast or orientation) or late (speed of motion) levels of visual processing and we compared RT to imagined and seen stimuli. In all the experiments visual features had similar effect on reaction time to seen and imagined stimuli. These results support the view that there is an overlap between perceptual and imagery neural bases in the visual cortex and in the extrastriate areas. In the second part I am going to present the case of visual suppression and what happens to the suppressed stimuli. We employed a redundant target effect (RTE) - a speeding up of RT to multiple versus single stimuli- paradigm as a behavioural tool to cast light on the neural bases of dominance and suppression during rivalry. We compared the RTs to single and double presentation, when one of the two stimuli was dominant and suppressed during rivalry. RTE was noticed only for dominance rather than suppression. RTE during dominance was in keeping with neural-coactivation rather than probability summation. These results support the idea that unconscious (suppressed) and conscious (dominant) visual stimuli are processed by different pathways and that rivalry could take place from early stages.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 27 October 2010

Head-centred reorganization of posterior parietal topographic maps in the human brain

4:00pm to 5:00pm, L47, Psychology Department, Dr Jason Connolly (Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University)

The brain must somehow convert retinal coordinates into those required for directing an effector; for example, calculating distance relative to our reaching hand and limb.  One prominent theory postulates that retinal information is combined with input from the position of the eyes in the orbita to compute hand-centred representations within the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). An alternative theory, supported by recent visual and saccade fMRI topographic mapping studies, purports that PPC neurons represent only the retinal-centric location, and these should remain unaffected by changes in starting eye position.  Here we report that memory-guided saccade topographic maps show dramatic spatial reorganization with only a 4 degree change in starting eye position and despite constant retinal input.  Such re-organization was present within the entire medial PPC. These data provide evidence of large scale cortical topographic map reorganization in the human brain upon subtle changes of gaze position and are likely to be germane to other sensory systems.  The head- or body-centered reorganization may represent a key mechanism for calculating effector-specific coordinate frames.

Contact psychology.office@dur.ac.uk for more information about this event.