Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Durham University

Wolfson Research Institute for Health and Wellbeing

Previous Events

List of months

Friday 15 April 2011

Wolfson Research Institute & GoHWell Guest Lecture: 'Evaluating the health effects of natural experiments' by Professor Sally MacIntyre, University of Glasgow; and Honorary Director of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit

1:00pm to 2:30pm, D004, Ebsworth Building, Durham University, Queen's Campus, University Boulevard, Stockton on Tees, TS17 6BH


The Wolfson Research Institute and Geographies of Health and Wellbeing (GoHWell) Research Group is delighted to welcome Professor Sally Macintyre.  Sally is a professor in the College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow; and Honorary Director of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit.

Professor MacIntyre's presentation will cover issues relating to the evaluation of the effects on health or the determinants of health of naturally occurring experiments, i.e. those not under the control of researchers. It will discuss how to generate the best available evidence, and give a preview of the new MRC guidance on the evaluation of natural experiments.  It will cover examples of uses of natural experiments in the population health sciences, and issues around round the design, analysis and reporting of natural experimental studies.

Biography:
Professor Sally Macintyre is a professor in the College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow; and Honorary Director of the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit.  A medical sociologist, recently she has researched socioeconomic and spatial inequalities in health across time and over the life course, using data from individuals, households and areas to improve understanding of the significance of the social and physical environment for health. Current interests include the potential of area-based health promotion initiatives, the role of neighbourhood barriers and facilitators for health, and developing an evidence-base for health improvement and reducing health inequalities.

Timings:
12:30 - Tea/Coffee Refreshments available (Ebsworth Reception)
13:00 - Welcome
13:05 - Lecture commences
14:00 - Questions and answers
14:30 - Close

Registration:
Online registration is now open: to book a place please click here.

If you have any questions please contact Linda Crowe by email or on 0191 334 0013.

Location:
http://www.dur.ac.uk/map/qc3d/

 

Contact linda.crowe@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 8 April 2011

Wolfson Guest Lecture: 'Judging nudging: choice architecture and social norming in health related behaviour change' by Professor Mike Kelly, Director of the Centre for Public Health Excellence, National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE)

1:00pm to 2:30pm, D004, Ebsworth Building, Durham University, Queen's Campus, University Boulevard, Stockton on Tees, TS17 6BJ


The Wolfson Research Institute is delighted to welcome Professor Mike Kelly, Director of the Centre for Public Health Excellence, NICE.

Professor Kelly will deliver a paper that will consider the scientific and philosophical arguments relating to the approaches to behaviour change popularly known as nudge and social norming.  These ideas have been widely cited by Ministers as part of their approach to the organisation and delivery of public health by the coalition government.  They are contrasted with regulation, legislation and other elements of the 'nanny state'.  This paper will argue that these ideas are both an interesting paradigm shift, at least potentially, as well as being the latest guise of government's repeated attempts to deal with some fundamental and wicked public health problems.  These problems, and their attempted solutions, can be traced back at least to the Elizabethan Poor Law.  The work of contemporary nudge theorists will be placed in an historical context and in the intellectual context of the behavioural and social sciences where arguably these ideas have been around for a very long time indeed.  The implications for contemporary public health policy and practice as well as the current reorganisation will be assessed.

Biography:
Professor Mike Kelly is Director of the Centre of Public Health Excellence at NICE where he leads on the development of public health guidance.  He is a public health practitioner, researcher and academic.  He originally graduated in Social Science from the University of York, holds a Masters degree in Sociology from the University of Leicester, and undertook his PhD in the Department of Psychiatry in the University of Dundee.  Before joining NICE he was Director of Evidence and Guidance at the Health Development Agency.  Professor Kelly has held posts at the Universities of   Leicester, Dundee, Glasgow, Greenwich and Abertay.  He now has an honorary chair in the Department of Public Health and Policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, is Honorary Professor in Community Based Medicine, in the Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, the University of Manchester, and Visiting Professor in the School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield.  He is a Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians.

He is a medical sociologist with research interests in evidence based approaches to health improvement, methodological problems in public health research, evidence synthesis, coronary heart disease prevention, chronic illness, disability, physical activity, health inequalities, social identity and community involvement in health promotion.  From 2005-8 he was the co leader of the Measurement and Evidence Knowledge Network of World Health Organisation's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health.  He has published more than two hundred papers in medical, social scientific and public health journals and is author/ editor of seven books.  In 2010 he was awarded the Alwyn Smith Prize of the Faculty of Public Health for his work on cardiovascular disease and alcohol misuse prevention.  

Timings:
12:30 - Tea/Coffee Refreshments available (Ebsworth Reception)
13:00 - Welcome
13:05 - Lecture commences
14:00 - Questions and answers
14:30 - Close

Registration:
This conference is now fully booked. If you would like to be added to the waiting list please contact Linda Crowe on 0191 3340 0013.

Location:
http://www.dur.ac.uk/map/qc3d/

 

 

 

Contact linda.crowe@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Thursday 7 April 2011

Wolfson Workshop - Systematic Reviews

9:00am to 1:30pm, Wolfson Seminar Room, Wolfson Research Institute, Queen's Campus

Places are now full.

The Wolfson Research Institute is delighted to be running the first Wolfson Workshop. There will be four held each year, all of which will focus on an issue that is common across different disciplines.  

The first workshop will be run by: 

  • Professor Clare Bambra, Wolfson Research Institute and Department of Geography
  • Professor David Budgen, School of Engineering & Computing Sciences,
  • Professor Steve Higgins, School of Education
  • Professor Carolyn Summerbell, School of Medicine & Health.

The aim of the workshop is to provide an overview of Systematic Review methods and their use in different disciplines. The Workshop is particularly appropriate for Postgraduate and Post-doctoral Researchers.

Timings:

9.00am - 9.30am Arrival, Tea/Coffee Refreshments available (Wolfson Street)
9.30am - 11.00am Workshop Part 1 (F009 Wolfson Seminar Room)
11.00am - 11.30am Tea/Coffee Refreshments available (Wolfson Street)
11.30am - 1.00pm Workshop Part 2 (F009 Wolfson Seminar Room)
1.00pm - 1.30pm Lunch (Wolfson Street)
1.30pm Close

Registration

This event is now full and therefore online registeration is now closed.  There is a reserve list and if you wish to be placed onto this please contact Jennifer Cook (40206) by no later than Friday 25 March.

Wolfson Workshops 2011

July 2011 (date to be set)

Topic:  Researching with disadvantaged communities

Run by: 

  • Dr Andrew Armstrong, School of Applied Social
    Sciences
  • Professor Sarah Banks, School of Applied Social Sciences
  • Dr Helen Close, School of Medicine & Health
  • Dr Helen Hancock, School of Medicine & Health
  • Dr Andrew Russell, Department of Anthropology

September 2011 (date to be set) 

Topic:   Item Response Theory

Run by:

  • Professor Rob Coe, School of Education
  • Dr Paul Tiffin, School of Medicine & Health

November  2011 (date to be set)

Topic:  Humanities and Health

Run by:

  • Professor Martyn Evans, School of Medicine &
    Health
  • Professor Jane McNaughton, School of Medicine & Health
  • Dr Sarah Atkinson, Department of Geography

Contact jennifer.cook2@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 6 April 2011

School of Education - Research Seminar: 'The emperor has no clothes: challenging the new orthodoxy of the social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme' by Professor Neil Humphrey

1:00pm to 2:30pm, School of Education, Room ED134, Leazes Road, Durham, DH1 1TA


The next School of Education research seminar will be delivered on Wednesday 6th April at 1pm in room ED134 (Leazes Road). It will be given by Prof. Neil Humphrey of University of Manchester on the subject of "The emperor has no clothes: challenging the new orthodoxy of the social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL) programme".

Since its initial launch as part of the Primary Behaviour and Attendance Pilot, the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme has swept through the English education system, with current estimates suggesting that it is being implemented in 90% of primary schools and 70% of secondary schools. The SEAL programme has been promoted as a panacea, with most schools and Local Authorities (LAs) adopting it in an unquestioning manner. However, far from being a universal remedy, the various evaluation studies that have been conducted to date on the different guises of SEAL suggest that it has in fact failed to achieve the majority of its intended outcomes. In this seminar, I will provide a review of these studies in order to substantiate this claim, before presenting a critical analysis of the broader issues surrounding the orthodoxy of ‘social and emotional learning' (SEL) in education. These issues include the lack of conceptual coherence evident in SEL, problems with the evidence base, and the superiority assumption of whole school approaches. I will conclude by considering how SEAL rose to such prominence in the English education system through the lens of Stich's (1993) four-factor model of the promotion of unfounded ideas.

Further information available at www.dur.ac.uk/education/events .

Contact sheena.smith@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.