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Durham University

Wolfson Research Institute for Health and Wellbeing

Previous Events

List of months

Wednesday 31 March 2010

Conference - 'Commissioning for Health and Wellbeing: Policy into Practice'

10:00am to 3:00pm, St. Aidan's College, Durham University, Durham City

 

Commissioners make decisions in a context of governance structures and incentive arrangements which are complex and often ill aligned. Drawing on findings of an NIHR SDO-funded research project 'Public Health Governance and Primary Care Delivery', this conference,  organised by the Centre for Public Policy and Health, Durham University, directly addresses the challenges  involved in commissioning for health and well-being and in shifting  the balance of investment towards prevention.

This event is free, however places are limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment. Contact Judith MacFadyen with your registration (j.m.macfadyen@durham.ac.uk ) by 12th March 2010.

To review the full conference programme and register please review the links noted below.

Contact j.m.macfadyen@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 22 March 2010

The Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning - Workshop Series - Starting Your Own Business

12:00pm to 2:00pm, Ustinov Room, Van Mildert College, Durham


The Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning would like to invite you to a series of short workshops which will explore the concepts of entrepreneurship and enterprise and what they mean to us as members of staff within the University - and indeed our lives in general.

The overall aim of the workshops is to raise awareness of the range of enterprising practices within the university and to support staff in designing, developing and embedding enterprising practices in their own work, whether this is related to research, teaching, management or administration.

The workshops will be interactive and facilitated by staff and associates of the Centre and invited external speakers.

Contact http://www.dur.ac.uk/training.course (academic practice) for more information about this event.


Friday 19 March 2010

Conference - Ethical and methodological issues in research and disaster interventions that cross borders

9:00am to 4:15pm, Lindisfarne Centre, St. Aidan's College, Durham University

Contact lena.dominelli@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 17 March 2010

Africa Regional Interest Group Meeting

5:00pm to 7:30pm, Derman Christopherson Room, Calman Learning Centre, Durham University, Speakers: Myles Wickstead CBE (Commission for Africa) and Dr. Alice Norton (Wellcome Trust).


The second meeting of the Africa Regional Interest Group will take place on Wednesday the 17th March at 5.00pm. Guest speakers include Myles Wickstead CBE (Commission for Africa) and Dr. Alice Norton (Wellcome Trust).

Capacity is limited, therefore to book a place please click here.


Tuesday 16 March 2010

The Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning - Workshop Series - Embedding Enterprise in Teaching and Learning

12:00pm to 2:00pm, Ustinov Room, Van Mildert College, Durham


The Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning would like to invite you to a series of short workshops which will explore the concepts of entrepreneurship and enterprise and what they mean to us as members of staff within the University - and indeed our lives in general.

The overall aim of the workshops is to raise awareness of the range of enterprising practices within the university and to support staff in designing, developing and embedding enterprising practices in their own work, whether this is related to research, teaching, management or administration.

The workshops will be interactive and facilitated by staff and associates of the Centre and invited external speakers.

Contact http://www.dur.ac.uk/training.course (academic practice) for more information about this event.


Monday 15 March 2010

The Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning - Workshop Series - Embedding enterprise in Research

12:00pm to 2:00pm, Turner Room, Van Mildert College, Durham


The Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning would like to invite you to a series of short workshops which will explore the concepts of entrepreneurship and enterprise and what they mean to us as members of staff within the University - and indeed our lives in general.

The overall aim of the workshops is to raise awareness of the range of enterprising practices within the university and to support staff in designing, developing and embedding enterprising practices in their own work, whether this is related to research, teaching, management or administration.

The workshops will be interactive and facilitated by staff and associates of the Centre and invited external speakers.

The second in the series Embedding enterprise in Research takes place on Monday March 15th at 12:00 until 14:00. Lunch will be provided. 

This workshop provides an opportunity to explore the ways in which enterprising abilities and skills can be used to assist in undertaking research within the University. The workshop will reflect upon how enterprising skills such as creativity, networking, dealing with uncertainty and ambiguity can assist you in identifying and accessing relevant sources of funding, forming partnerships with other institutions, getting articles published and developing your profile.

This session will be particularly useful for researchers in the early stage of their career who would like to know more about ways in which being enterprising can assist in their future development.

Contact to http://www.dur.ac.uk/training.course (academic practice) for more information about this event.


Friday 12 March 2010

The Spirit level; why more equal societies are better for everyone' - Professor Richard Wilkinson, Emeritus Professor of Social Epidemiology

1:00pm to 2:30pm, D004, Ebsworth Building, Queen's Campus, Stockton, TS17 6BH


The Wolfson Research Institute is delighted to welcome invited guest, Professor Richard Wilkinson, Emeritus Professor of Social Epidemiology to Durham University, Queen's Campus, Stockton to deliver a guest lecture on Friday 12th March 2010.  The full programme is noted below.

Abstract

If you look at rich countries and compare life expectancy, mental health, homicide rates, conflict between school children, teenage birth rates, imprisonment, drug abuse, obesity rates, levels of trust, the educational performance of school children, or the strength of community life, you find that countries which tend to do well on one of these measures tend to do well on all of them, and the ones which do badly, tend to do badly on all of them.  What accounts for the difference?

The key seems to be the amount of inequality in each society. The picture is consistent whether we compare rich countries or the 50 states of the USA.  The more unequal a society is, the more ill health and social problems it has.  Fundamental to the way inequality damages the social fabric of a society is the way it weakens community life, lowers levels of trust, and increases violence.  It seems likely that the extent of income inequality in each society serves as a determinant and expression of the scale and importance of social class stratification.  The greater the inequality, the greater the status competition and the more prevalent are all the problems associated with relative deprivation.  However, although the amount of inequality has its greatest effect on rates of problems among the poor, its affects extend to almost all income groups reducing levels of well-being among the vast majority of the population.

Inequality has always been regarded as socially corrosive. Now comparisons between rich market democracies show that even small differences in inequality affect the quality of social relations in society at large. Research on the social determinants of health provides some pointers to why we are so sensitive to inequality: it increases status insecurity, raises the "social evaluative threat" and heightens issues of respect and disrespect.  Particularly important are the effects of low social status, poor friendship networks and early childhood experience. These affect forms of psychosocial insecurity, anxiety and people's sense of whether they are valued and appreciated.  Through these pathways inequality not only affects social relation within a society, but also leads to differences in international relations.

Contact linda.crowe@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 8 March 2010

The Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning - Workshop Series - Being enterprising in the University – What Is It All About?

12:00pm to 2:00pm, Ustinov Room, Van Mildert College, Durham

 

The Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning would like to invite you to a series of short workshops which will explore the concepts of entrepreneurship and enterprise and what they mean to us as members of staff within the University - and indeed our lives in general.

The overall aim of the workshops is to raise awareness of the range of enterprising practices within the university and to support staff in designing, developing and embedding enterprising practices in their own work, whether this is related to research, teaching, management or administration.

The workshops will be interactive and facilitated by staff and associates of the Centre and invited external speakers.

The first in the series Being enterprising in the University - What Is It All About? takes place on Monday March 8th at 12:00 until 14:00. Lunch will be provided.

Contact http://www.dur.ac.uk/training.course (academic practice) for more information about this event.


Friday 5 March 2010

The Centre for History of Medicine & Disease - Research Seminar - ''Arbitrary negative conclusions'? Determining psychiatric knowledge during the 1970s - the case of the Feingold diet'

12:00pm to 2:30pm, Wolfson Research Institute, Seminar Room F009, Durham University, Queen's Campus, Stockton-on-Tees, Guest Speaker: Matthew Smith

The Centre for the History of Medicine, Durham University, UK.  Sponsored by the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine, supported by the Wellcome Trust, London, welcomes Matthew Smith (University of Exeter) ''Arbitrary negative conclusions'? Determining psychiatric knowledge during the 1970s - the case of the Feingold diet'.

Contact Katherine.smith@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 3 March 2010

Seminar: The New Body: Medicine, Technology and Bodily Life

12:30pm to 4:30pm, W010, Department of Geography, Durham University, South Road, Durham, Dr Karen Throsby, University of Warwick and Dr. Gail Davies, UCL

Both human and non-human bodies are being re-made. Biomedical practices increasingly aim to create new types of bodies and embodiments, informed by a range of contemporary social and moral discourse.  At a molecular level contemporary advances in stem-cell research, biotechnology and nano-medicine seek to both uncover and manipulate the very building blocks of both human and non-human life.

The aim of the seminar is to explore the interface between the medical sciences, technological development and bodily life.  Two leading scholars will present research on what might be termed the "new geographies of life".

 

Contact Rachel.Pears@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.