Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Durham University

What's On

Lectures, Seminars, Workshops, Conferences

At Durham University you'll find an extensive programme of public lectures and seminars. With an impressive line up of experts and renowned academics speaking on a myriad of topics, the aim is to share knowledge and encourage debate. Lectures on thought provoking subjects as diverse as history and astro-physics are aimed at a general audience and delivered at various locations across the University. Lectures in the Castle Public Lecture Series take place within the Great Hall of historic Durham Castle, while the Institute of Advanced Study hosts a year round programme of inter-disciplinary lectures. Our Museums offer public lectures to accompany exhibitions and events and our Colleges celebrate that they are scholary communities with series' such as Cafe Politique, Cafe Scientifique and Cafe des Arts.

Public lectures are free of charge and open to all.

Tuesday 15 October 2019

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - Music in the Mind and the Brain

5:30pm to 6:30pm, Penthouse Suite, Collingwood College

Professor Andrea Halpern (Bucknell University)

Abstract
Music is nearly universal among human cultures and although not everyone is a trained musician, most people, from children to adults, are able to understand and appreciate music. Professor Andrea Halpern summarises a variety of research projects in which she tries to capture the capabilities and limitations of the mind and brain when understanding, and remembering music, including music that you only imagine. She will also talk about the most universal musical skill, singing, and how studying bad singing can be scientifically illuminating and include some consideration of music processing in healthy aging and dementia.

This lecture is free and open to all.

Please visit the IAS website for more information.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 16 October 2019

Research Seminar: Space for change: using the physical environment to support pedagogical innovation

1:00pm to 2:00pm, ED134

A seminar from Dr Pamela Woolner, Senior Lecturer in Education at Newcastle University. Everyone is welcome to attend and booking is not required.

Contact ed.research@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Brexit and Immigration Status of EU colleagues

2:00pm to 5:00pm, Derman Christopherson Room, Calman Learning Centre (CLC406)

As part of our continuing commitment to our non-UK colleagues we are delighted to be working in partnership with Womble Bond Dickinson who will deliver a session on the effects of Brexit on EU nationals' immigration status at this current time

Contact hr.ukvi@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Theatrical interventions in the history of psychiatry

5:00pm to 6:00pm, CA201 Caedmon Building

Céline Kaiser explores the role that theatrical interventions have played in the history of psychotherapy and their potential therapeutic value. She will also explore the interplay of medical humanities research approaches with those of artistic investigations.

Contact imh.mail@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Translating Religion: Devotion and Piety From Europe to the Anglophone World in the Nineteenth Century

5:30pm to 7:15pm, Ushaw College

Ushaw Lecture by Dr Anne O'Connor. This lecture is open to all and is free of charge. More details, including details of help with transport between Durham City and Ushaw, available at https://centreforcatholicstudies.eventbrite.com

Contact ccs.admin@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Martha Rust – The Roundel: Window onto the Domain of a Concept

5:45pm to 7:00pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

This lecture, by a distinguished American scholar who works on the literary-historical period of the Middle Ages, focuses on late medieval manuscript culture - the network of beliefs and practices that constituted the milieu of medieval book production and use.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


DEI Public Lecture: Has 2019 been a turning point in tackling the climate crisis?

6:00pm to 7:00pm, Hogan Lovells Lecture Theatre, Palatine Centre, Durham University, DH1 3LE

In this public lecture David looks back at the major climate milestones of the year so far, before having a conversation about the future of UK climate action and energy transition.

Contact lynn.gibson@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Thursday 17 October 2019

Shoestring Poetry Press Reading

5:00pm to 6:00pm, St Chad's College Chapel

A Durham Book Festival Fringe event featuring three brilliant poets with thirteen full collections between them. Free admission, all welcome!

Contact s.r.regan@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - How to find a fossil on Mars

5:30pm to 6:30pm, Ustinov Room, Van Mildert College

Dr Sean McMahon (University of Edinburgh)

Abstract
Conditions at the surface of Mars are probably too cold, too dry, and too destructive of organic molecules to sustain “life as we know it”. We cannot yet explore the deep subsurface, where conditions might be more favourable. But we can search the Martian surface for fossils — the remains of long-dead organisms preserved in ancient rocks. We know from abundant geological evidence that Mars was warm and watery in the distant past, and NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory mission (particularly Curiosity Rover) has now confirmed that early Mars was habitable. A new generation of robotic rovers is therefore being prepared to seek fossils in the rocks laid down by ancient Martian waters. The question is, what exactly should they look for, and where should they look for it? In this talk, Dr McMahon will discuss how we can apply our knowledge of fossil preservation on Earth and the geology of Mars to this multi-billion-dollar scientific question.
This lecture is free and open to all.

Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 21 October 2019

Trust and Trustworthiness in an Age of Digital Communication.

6:30pm to 7:30pm, St Chad's College, Cassidy Quad, 18 North Bailey

SCR Lecture

Contact chads.commercial@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


St Chad's SCR Lecture

6:30pm to 7:30pm, St Chad's Cassidy Quad, Lady Onora O'Neill

This year's St Chad's SCR Lecturer is Professor Lady Onora O’Neill speaking on Trust and Trustworthiness in an Age of Digital Communication.

Contact chads.commercial@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 22 October 2019

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - From Eugenics to Human Gene Editing: Ideology, Power and Engineering Life in China in a Global Context

5:30pm to 6:30pm, Sheraton Park, Ustinov College

Professor Jing-Bao Nie (University of Otago)

Abstract
Gene editing technologies such as CRISPR-Cas9 have the capacity to alter the world forever through altering the genetic make-up of humankind. The announcement by a Chinese scientist in late November 2018 of the birth of the world’s first gene-edited babies sparked outrage across the world. Among numerous ethical issues, editing heritable germline genomes of otherwise healthy embryos for natural resistance to HIV constitutes an effort of positive eugenics, i.e. not treating disease but enhancing genetic features. This paradigm case of scientific misconduct has its roots in the widespread practice of yousheng (eugenics) in China and in the nation’s pursuit of science superpower status. Eugenics has long been a global phenomenon, and the engineering and instrumentalising of human life is a fundamental feature of global modernity. This lecture will offer a socio-ethical inquiry into how the ideologies of sinicised social Darwinism, nationalism and scientism have shaped the Chinese authoritarian model of human genetic engineering in a global context.
This lecture is free and open to all.

Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 23 October 2019

Research Seminar: Better to light a candle than to curse in the dark

1:00pm to 2:00pm, ED134

A seminar from Dr Pauline Moger of the School of Education, Durham University. Everyone is welcome to attend and booking is not required.

Contact ed.research@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Thursday 24 October 2019

EPSRC Big Ideas Workshop

9:30am to 2:00pm, Lindisfarne Centre, St Aidan's College

EPSRC has introduced the ‘Big Ideas’ initiative to collect adventurous and exciting ideas from the wider research community. Big Ideas must be ambitious and have the ability to transform the research landscape – they need to have a ‘WOW factor’! Not necessarily driven by scale, they are looking for a level of ambition and transformational potential embedded within the idea. Big Ideas are those that are hard to achieve, require significant support (financial, people, skills) to make them possible and have ground-breaking impacts (in all forms). Big Ideas also attract public, industry and government enthusiasm and excitement, either by the nature of the science itself or by the potential socio-economic changes it could offer in the future.

Contact lindsay.bell@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Confucianism and organ donation: Moral duties from xiao (filial piety) to ren (humanity)

5:00pm to 6:30pm, CA201 Caedmon Building

Does the influential Chinese tradition of Confucianism really discourage organ donation? Visiting fellow Jing-Bao Nie challenges this widely-held belief.

Contact imh.mail@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - Women Mediator Networks: achievements and challanges faced by an emerging phenomenon

5:30pm to 6:30pm, Sir James Knott Hall, Trevelyan College

Irene Fellin (Istituto Affari Internazionali)

Abstract
Almost twenty years following the passing of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security, the number of women leading mediation, negotiation and other conflict resolution processes at the global level is still insignificant.
As part of a global movement to enhance women’s meaningful participation and influence in peace processes at all levels, several regional networks of women mediators have been established in recent years: the Nordic Women Mediators, the Network of African Women in Conflict Prevention and Mediation (FemWise-Africa), the Mediterranean Women Mediators Network, the Women Mediators across the Commonwealth, and most recently the Arab Women Mediators Network - League of Arab States. Moreover, an increasing number of countries and multilateral organizations are expressing interest in setting up or supporting similar initiatives. All these initiatives underline the importance given by the international community to the role of women in conflict managing and prevention, in line with the principles embedded in UNSCR 1325 and related resolutions. At the same time, they aim to raise awareness on the multiple challenges that hinder women’s equal and full participation in this sector, with a specific focus on the role of women mediators.
What are the achievements and obstacles faced by regional Women Mediator Networks? What are the challenges in connecting the agenda of mediation on one side, and the one of the Women, Peace and Security agenda on the other? And fundamentally, what is the added value of Women Mediator Networks and what impact do they have on the Global agenda of mediation for the 21st century?
This public lecture is part of a broader research project on Mediation for the 21st Century. Based on the concrete experience of the Mediterranean Women Mediators Network, Ms. Fellin views inclusive peace mediation through the lens of the agenda of Women, Peace and Security. In this talk, she will analyze the challenges, opportunities, and relationship with political key stakeholders that women peacebuilders and mediators face. The question is, what added value represent these networks and if all capital invested in these initiatives at international level, will really make a difference both in terms of numbers (more women mediators will be appointed) and in terms of content (ensuring gendered outcomes of peace processes).

This lecture is free and open to all.

Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 25 October 2019

Histories, Knowledge and Visual Culture

9:00am to 7:00pm, Prior’s Hall, Durham Cathedral

A conference organised by the Department of History and the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture, Durham University, to mark the retirement of Professor Ludmilla Jordanova.
She is a Professor of History and Visual Culture and the Director of the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture at Durham University.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 28 October 2019

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - Bridging Identity Conflict Fault Lines: Women and Youth Engagement in Community to National Peace Processes

5:30pm to 6:30pm, Joachim Room, College of St Hilde and St Bede

Martine Miller (International Centre for Religion and Diplomacy)

Abstract
Several peace processes in recent years have demonstrated the important influence of deepening identity conflict fault lines on official negotiations. In a response to conflict and violence, women and youth continue to transcend these identity divides—religious, ethnic, socio-economic—to work together to bridge gaps, air and address tensions, build trust, advance and inspire community to national level peace processes, negotiate with extremist actors, progressively reconcile and build trust. Despite successes while under intense threats, their peace work is impactful yet is often invisible. They are often not recognized, resulting in their capacities remaining untapped as a vital resource for ensuring more inclusive peace processes that transcend identities and result in more durable negotiated agreements and implementations. This public lecture analyzes the challenges, opportunities, specific methods, and amplifies the role of women and youth actors’ capacities to transcend identity divides, with a focus on religious and ethnic conflict fault lines at the community to national level peace processes in Afghanistan, Myanmar, South Thailand, South Sudan and Libya.

This lecture is free and open to all.

Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 29 October 2019

Celebrate Science 2019

10:00am to 4:00pm, Marquee, Palace Green, Durham

Now in its tenth year!
Our annual Celebrate Science festival returns to Palace Green for another 3 fun-packed and fascinating days of FREE children's events, activities, workshops and experiments celebrating science!


Simon Bradley – Writing County Durham: Nikolaus Pevsner and Ian Nairn

5:45pm to 5:45pm, Durham Town Hall

County Durham was surveyed in the 1950s-60s by two of the most celebrated writers on England's buildings and places, Nikolaus Pevsner and Ian Nairn. Over half a century later, how well have their assessments endured?

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 30 October 2019

Celebrate Science 2019

10:00am to 4:00pm, Marquee, Palace Green, Durham

Now in its tenth year!
Our annual Celebrate Science festival returns to Palace Green for another 3 fun-packed and fascinating days of FREE children's events, activities, workshops and experiments celebrating science!


Thursday 31 October 2019

Celebrate Science 2019

10:00am to 4:00pm, Marquee, Palace Green, Durham

Now in its tenth year!
Our annual Celebrate Science festival returns to Palace Green for another 3 fun-packed and fascinating days of FREE children's events, activities, workshops and experiments celebrating science!


Monday 4 November 2019

Andrzej Olechnowicz – History Now! Why is the Labour Party So Conservative?

5:45pm to 7:00pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

Historically, the Labour Party has accepted the existing institutions of the British state, attempting to use them for its own purposes. Why has it sought to work through institutions not of its own making, and now fundamentally corrupted by private, corporate interests? Does a return to public policy require a refashioning of a public realm once more?

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 5 November 2019

St Mary's College Society Annual Lecture

8:30pm to 10:00pm, Kenworthy Hall, St Mary's College, Elvet Hill Road, Durham, DH1 3LR

'Rehabilitation in prisons, the story so far', by Governor of Frankland Prison, Gavin O'Malley.

Contact smc.society@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Thursday 7 November 2019

Did Alexander the Great die from Guillain-Barré Syndrome?

5:00pm to 6:30pm, CA201 Caedmon Building

Great mystery surrounds the death of Alexander the Great in ancient Greece, 323BC. Dr Katherine Hall presents an alternative explanation for this intriguing case.

Contact imh.mail@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Worlds of Print: Creative Writing in Colonial West Africa, 1880s-1930s

6:15pm to 7:15pm, Ken Wade Lecture Theatre, Calman Learning Centre

This lecture by Professor Steph Newell (Yale) will give an overview of the central role of African-owned newspapers in creating platforms and publics for the earliest West African creative writers in English.

The lecture will ask: what kind of cultural and political encounters were articulated by authors in writing fiction and poetry for the press? Why did they choose English above other literary languages?

Contact j.a.terry@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 11 November 2019

Returning to Science: A career workshop

10:30am to 2:00pm, Biosciences Department.

Ever worked in science research and would like to return but don't know how ? Our workshop could help set you on the path back there.

Contact helen.l.thompson@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Joe Martin – History Now! Do We Need a Manhattan Project for Artificial Intelligence?

5:45pm to 7:00pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

Since the crash programme to build nuclear weapons in the 1940s, it has often been suggested that major technical and scientific problems need their own Manhattan Projects. Recently, calls have come for a Manhattan Project for AI. Why should this secret wartime project offer a good historical example for AI research to follow?

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 12 November 2019

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - Origin of clay minerals and their perspectives

6:30pm to 7:30pm, St Cuthbert's Society

Dr Elshan Abdullayev (French-Azerbaijani University)
Abstract
Clays have been used since prehistoric times, for example for the fabrication of ceramics. Today, clays find numerous technological and industrial applications.
Clay minerals are fine-grained material, which become pliable when they interact with water. The minerals comprise silica, alumina, water and also iron, alkalis and alkaline earth elements. Clay minerals belong to phllosilcates and are divided into several groups based on their properties: the kaolin and serpentine groups, the talc and pyrophyllite groups, the expandable smectite and vermiculite groups, the illite group, the chlorite group, and the sepiolite-palygorskite. The earth mineral evolution is divided into 3 eras and 10 stages. Clay mineral formation began at stage 3, at the earliest part of the Hadean Eon due to alternation of ultramafic and basaltic rocks.
There are several ways of formation of clay minerals: (i) Aqueous alternation, (ii) Authigenesis, (iii) Diagenesis, (iv) Terrestrial weathering, and (v) Biomediated clay mineralization. These processes drive chemical composition and properties of the clay minerals.
Depending upon their chemical and physical properties, clay minerals can be applied to different areas. Investigation of clay mineral-water interaction is important to all aspects of geology, water science, soil science, geotechnical engineering, geomorphology, seismology, astrobiology and atmospheric science. Due to the high surface charges originating from isomorphous substitution in the crystal lattice, and from the presence of pH dependent surface edges or broken bond sites, clay minerals can absorb positively charged ions and organic components on their surface. In addition, some chemical elements in clay minerals can be potential sources of nutrients for bacteria. Clay mineral-bacteria interaction can play a major role in formation of new minerals. Such properties of clay minerals can also be used in some internal and external medical treatment.
Clay minerals are also good indicators for the study of past climatic conditions and sea level changes.
This lecture is free and open to all.
Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 13 November 2019

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - Peace processes revisited: From negotiating conflict towards democratizing peace

5:30pm to 6:30pm, Birley Room, Hatfield College

Johanna Poutanen (Crisis Management Initiative)
Abstract
Today’s peace processes have become ever more complex – involving various stakeholders negotiating multiple issues on multiple levels. Indeed, peace mediation is increasingly moving away from brokering limited deals between small groups of military and political leaders behind closed doors. The calls for inclusivity demand that a broader range of actors have a say in shaping the future of their country.
Has the increased complexity and ambition of mediation fundamentally altered the nature of peace negotiations? Can we talk about ‘negotiations’ when peace processes are increasingly about crafting a new social contract and political system for the country rather than simply negotiating the division of power? And fundamentally, is it possible to design peace processes that go beyond elite power sharing deals between armed groups, and engage a broader range of national stakeholders, such as women and youth?
This public lecture is part of broader research project on Mediation for the 21st Century and combines both theoretical and empirical insights from recent peace processes in contexts such as South Sudan and Yemen to analyze today’s mediation praxis. Whereas much of mediation scholarship has been approached from the perspective of international relations or negotiations theory, this lecture views inclusive peace mediation through the lens of democratic theory. It is suggested that applying ideas of democratic representation and deliberation to the context of peace negotiations may help to shift the focus from normative to substantive matters: what and whose interests should be represented in mediation processes? How and under which conditions?
This lecture is free and open to all.
Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 18 November 2019

Fostering Solidarity in Challenging Times: Exploring Ethical and Political Issues for Participatory Action Research

10:30am to 4:30pm

Monday, 18 November 2019

Venue: Penthouse Suite, Collingwood College, South Road, Durham DH1 3LT. Travelling to Collingwood College.

Timings: Commence 10.30 and finish 16.30.

Social and political differences exist in all societies. These differences when antagonized can sometimes fuel social divisions, collective hostility and even violence against the ‘others’, posing serious threats to our democracy and people’s equal participation in public and political affairs. Some examples are the extreme austerity measures targeting the poor and the disadvantaged, the rise of patriotism and the far-right in the UK and European contexts, and the democratic struggles in shrinking political and civic space of Southeast Asian and African countries.

What are the opportunities that Participatory Action Research (PAR) may offer to promote dialogues and foster solidarity in socially and politically challenging times? In this event, we will critically reflect on the concept of ‘situated solidarity’ and explore the limitations and potentials of Participatory Action Research for working with diverse social and political groups to make change together. In the workshops, facilitators will work with participants to consider how to design inclusive participatory action research, identifying barriers and solutions for ensuring equitable participation of all partners and fostering solidarity across social and political differences.

Booking is ESSENTIAL - do so here.


Tuesday 19 November 2019

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - Farmer Suicides: The subject enmeshed in political and moral economies, emotions and ordinary ethics

5:30pm to 6:30pm, Kenworthy Hall, St Mary's College

Professor Lia Bryant (University of South Australia)
Abstract
Male farmer suicide is an ongoing concern in a number of countries including for example, Australia, the USA, Great Britain, India and Scotland. In Australia, the dominant discursive framework shaping male farmer suicide is one of ‘drought stress’ constituted through a positivist empiricism and ‘psy’ discourses of mental health. The contours of this dominant framework operate to limit other possible renderings of farmer suicide and narrow the frame of appropriate response. Using empirical data from Australia, Professor Lia Bryant challenges this reductive perspective, which correlates drought and farmer suicide by developing a theoretical reading of farmer suicide as a multifaceted problem (which drought exacerbates) occurring in relation to intersections between subjectivities and political and moral economies/communities. She argues that political and moral economies operate to limit farmer autonomy and create ethical breaches within social and economic relations between farmers, corporations and the State thereby shaping farmer distress. Alongside the workings of political and moral economies, community discourses of moral worth circulate through everyday social interaction and comprise an ‘ordinary ethics’ in rural communities. These discourses underpin judgements of ethical selfhood and attribution of blame for diminished farm viability. As a consequence, farming subjectivities and masculinities are increasingly inscribed with shame and therefore distress.These intersecting conditions working across the political, economic, social, cultural, emotional, moral and corporeal suggest how suicide may emerge as a possibility for male family farmers.
This lecture is free and open to all.
Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Richard Huzzey – History Now! Temperance in the Town Hall: Drink, and Popular Petitioning in Victorian Durham

5:45pm to 7:00pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

Today, rival campaigns bombard MPs with e-petitions and e-mails, representing constituents’ views to Parliament. 150 years ago, residents of Durham met in the Town Hall – or local pubs – to have their say on national controversies, signing paper petitions as testimonials to the community’s voice. This talk reveals the battles between moral advocates of temperance and those defending traditional rights to a pint.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 26 November 2019

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - Clay Minerals as Antibacterial Agents: Mechanisms and Applications

6:30pm to 7:30pm, Kingsley Barrett Room, Calman Learning Centre

Professor Hailiang Dong (University of Miami)
Abstract
Certain naturally present clay minerals are capable of killing antibiotic-resistant human pathogens and thus, these clays have been proposed as antibiotic alternatives. The specific mechanisms for such antibacterial activity of natural clays include: 1) generation of lethal reactive oxygen species (ROS) from soluble Fe2 ; 2) Al toxicity. Both mechanisms require acidic pH to release Fe2 and Al from clay mineral. Recently, studies have demonstrated generation of ROS from structural Fe(II) in clays, which attack specific proteins and cause cell death. This mechanism works at neutral pH and the clay can be re-cycled multiple times. Because of these properties, clay minerals may be useful as antibacterial agents in clinical applications. This lecture will talk about recent results in further improving the efficiency of the antibacterial activity towards a variety of human pathogens under realistic human skin conditions (neutral pH, salt concentration).
This lecture is free and open to all.
Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 27 November 2019

IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - Transitions to vaping in the land of the long white cloud

5:30pm to 6:30pm, Fisher House, Stephenson College

Professor Janet Hoek (University of Otago)
Abstract
E-cigarettes, or vapes, are variously described as a disruptive technology that could dramatically reduce smoking and ‘a weapon of mass distraction’ that will prolong the smoking epidemic. The public health benefits these novel devices offer remain vigorously contested. Yet, how can such radically different perspectives co-exist? Addressing this question requires us to move beyond dominant biomedical addiction discourse and consider vaping as a social practice and not merely an alternative nicotine delivery system.
To explore how e-cigarettes, a disputed and ambiguous innovation, could improve health and well-being, we must first discover how people who smoke negotiate new identity positions as they attempt to transition to vaping. By probing the retention, creation or relinquishment of rituals formerly paired with smoking, we may gain new insights into these fundamentally different views on vaping and its likely impact on population health
This lecture is free and open to all.
Visit the IAS website for full details of this year's IAS Fellow’s Public Lectures.

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 29 November 2019

St Cuthbert's Society Annual Fellows' Lecture 2019

6:00pm to 9:00pm, Elvet Riverside 201

'If You Thought You Owned Your Own Body, Think Again: legal quirks and conundrums examined'
by Elspeth Talbot Rice QC at Elvet RIverside 201, 6pm on Friday 29th November.

Contact cuthberts.reception@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 3 December 2019

Behind the Scenes at the Bowes Museum

5:45pm to 7:00pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

The Bowes Museum is one of the jewels in County Durham’s crown. Those who care for and work with its collections discuss their work and share insights into its history and current activities.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 9 December 2019

Stefano Cracolici – The Grand Tour in the North East

5:45pm to 7:00pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

The Grand Tour had a tremendous impact on 18th and 19th century British identity. This lecture is structured as an artistic itinerary through the North-East looking for tangible traces of the Grand Tour, discernible at Alnwick Castle, Raby Castle, Rokeby Park among other places

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.