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Durham University

Vice-Chancellor's India Scholarships 2021/22

Engineering


Our courses produce modern engineers who are capable of solving problems across the traditional engineering boundaries. We have outstanding course content that equips engineers with the problem-solving skills of the 21st century. We pride ourselves on not only our world leading research, but also our links to significant industry partners. It is a very challenging and exciting time to become an Engineer, and we provide the perfect environment to begin this journey.


H103 General Engineering BEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H103
Degree BEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer, depending on the route chosen in Level 3.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 3 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The BEng Engineering degree is a high-quality three-year degree designed to offer you the knowledge and skills necessary to join engineering teams on graduation. It is complementary to the four-year Durham MEng, and transfer is possible between the courses up to the end of the second year.

In the first two years, the BEng covers the same broad base of engineering education as the MEng degree. In the third year, you choose to specialise in civil, electronic or mechanical engineering. The BEng prepares you for an exciting career in modern engineering, with the flexibility to respond to changing technologies.

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve a specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices have previously included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into one of three streams: Civil, Electrical, Electronic or Mechanical Engineering.

Each of the routes comprises appropriate stream-specific lecture content (four modules) plus an individual technical project (two modules). For your project, which is the highlight of most of our students’ degree, you will work closely with a project supervisor and will be responsible for planning, design and manufacture of equipment, experimentation, analysis and reporting of your results. For the Civil stream you will undertake a major design project supervised by practising Civil engineers (plus an academic supervisor), which will allow you to develop new skills and knowledge in various areas, from bridge design to geotechnical structures. Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics from land surveying to industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry, depending on the selected stream. 

The module lists for each route are given below:

Electrical Engineering Route

Compulsory modules: 

  • BEng Engineering Project
  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Power Semiconductor Devices 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3.

Electronic Engineering Route

Compulsory modules: 

  • BEng Engineering Project
  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3
  • Digital Electronics and Digital Signal Processing 3.

Mechanical Engineering Route

Compulsory modules: 

  • BEng Engineering Project
  • Materials 3
  • Solid Mechanics 3
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3
  • Electrical Engineering 3.

Civil Engineering Route

Compulsory modules: 

  • BEng Engineering Project
  • Geotechnics 3
  • Structures and Geomatics 3
  • Environmental Engineering 3
  • Civil Design 3.

 

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020.

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, you are encouraged to apply during your degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. You may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. You are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s 'Languages For All' scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist you in finding placement opportunities through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others. 

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the degree's formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the degree, as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that the course develops in you (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course).

In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance starts to shift in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. In the third year, fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of eight hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the technical project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offerA*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score38 with 666 in higher level subjects, including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programme offers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

Science A levels

Applicants taking Science A levels that include a practical component will be required to take and pass this as a condition of entry. This applies only to applicants sitting A levels with an English examination board.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H100 General Engineering MEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H100
Degree MEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Individual discipline pathways are accredited by the appropriate Professional Engineering Institution.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 4 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MEng Engineering degree is a four-year first degree that delivers the breadth and depth that you will need in the world of engineering. It is designed to produce graduates who will go on and lead engineering teams. Your first two years offer you a broad-based engineering education. You are then able to specialise in your third and fourth years.

At Durham in each year of your degree you will take six modules, the year is divided into three terms and there are examinations at the end of each year.

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices in the past have included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules, but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

In the third year of the degree the course splits into the following streams: Civil, Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering.

A major team design project now occupies a whole module of the course where you consider the device as a product and do everything from basic market research to design for manufacture. For the Civil stream you will undertake a major design project supervised by practising civil engineers (plus an academic supervisor), which will allow you to develop new skills and knowledge in various areas, from bridge design to geotechnical structures. Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics from land surveying to industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry, depending on the selected stream.

The modules for each stream comprise:

Electrical Engineering Route

Compulsory modules: 

  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Power Semiconductor Devices 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3
  • Engineering Design 3.

Electronic Engineering

Compulsory modules: 

  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Engineering Design 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3
  • Digital Electronics and Digital Signal Processing 3
  • Semiconductor Physics and Devices 3.

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering

Compulsory modules:

  • Materials 3
  • Solid Mechanics 3
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3
  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Engineering Design 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3.

Civil Engineering

Compulsory modules: 

  • Structures and Geomatics 3
  • Geotechnics 3
  • Environmental Engineering 3
  • Civil Design 3
  • Materials 3
  • Solid Mechanics 3.

In line with our integrated approach to engineering many of the modules taken in the third year are found in more than one stream.

Year 4

The highlight of the degree for many of our students is the final year project. This activity, which is half the year in most streams, involves working closely with an academic supervisor on an area of cutting-edge research and development. The best student projects have been featured in internationally recognised engineering journals, indicating that our students are amongst the finest young engineers in the world. In addition to this, you will take modules on advanced engineering topics.

The five final-year streams are Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautics, Electronic Engineering, and New and Renewable Energy. The modules for each stream are shown below, you will typically study six taught modules and the balance of work is project-based. Students on most streams can usually choose their sixth module from a list of options.

Aeronautical

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Non-Linear Solid Mechanics 4
  • Aircraft Structures 4
  • Aeromechanics 4
  • Fluid Mechanics 4
  • Turbomachinery and Propulsion 4.

Civil Engineering

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Advanced Geotechnical Engineering 4
  • Planning and Contract Law 4
  • Structural Design 4
  • Structures 4
  • Hydrology and Water Resources 4.

Electrical Engineering

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Renewable Energy Technologies 4
  • Future Vehicles 4
  • Electrical Energy Conversion 4
  • Power Electronics 4
  • Smart Energy Networks 4.

Electronic Engineering

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Radio and Digital Communications 4
  • Digital Signal Processing 4
  • Communications Networks 4
  • Advanced Electronics Measurement 4
  • Advanced Electronics 4
  • Photonics 4.

Mechanical Engineering

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Fluid Mechanics 4
  • Turbomachinery and Propulsion 4
  • Renewable Energy Technologies 4
  • Future Vehicles 4
  • Non-Linear Solid Mechanics 4.

Renewable Energy

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Renewable Energy Technologies 4
  • Future Vehicles 4
  • Electrical Energy Conversion 4
  • Smart Energy Networks 4
  • Decarbonisation of Heating and Cooling 4.

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, students are encouraged to apply during their degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. Students may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. Students are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s Languages For All scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist in finding placement opportunities for you through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others.     

 

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the degrees formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that you will develop (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course). In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance starts to shift in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. Lectures still play an important role in supporting you in developing your knowledge and skills, with an average of 10 hours a week. The frequency of laboratory practical sessions and design activities remains similar, but the tasks become more open-ended.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning continues in the final year, where fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of six hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the research and development project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with who you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

 

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offerA*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended DiplomaD*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score38 with 666 in higher level subjects including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programme offers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

Science A levels

Applicants taking Science A levels that include a practical component will be required to take and pass this as a condition of entry. This applies only to applicants sitting A levels with an English examination board.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H411 Engineering (Aeronautical) MEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H411
Degree MEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 4 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MEng Aeronautical Engineering degree is a four-year first degree that delivers the breadth and depth that you will need in the world of engineering. It is designed to produce graduates who will go on and lead engineering teams. Your first two years offer you a broad-based engineering education. You then specialise into Aeronautical Engineering in your third and fourth years. It is important to highlight that you can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first three years of your degree at Durham you will take six modules, the year is divided into three terms and there are examinations at the end of each year.  The taught modules in the final year are smaller to reflect their specialist content – you will take six of these modules plus a dissertation, or final year, project. 

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices in the past have included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules, but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Aeronautical Engineering.

You will take five taught modules covering important aspects of Aeronautical Engineering.  The sixth module is a major team design project, where you consider your design challenge as a product and do everything from basic market research to design for manufacture.  These design projects span our different third year specialisms so you will be working with students from other engineering disciplines – much like you will do when working as a graduate engineer.  Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics from such as industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry. 

Compulsory modules:

  • Materials 3
  • Solid Mechanics 3
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3
  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Engineering Design 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3.

Year 4

The highlight of the degree for many of our students is the final year project. This activity, which is half the year in most streams, involves working closely with an academic supervisor on an area of cutting-edge research and development. The best student projects have been featured in internationally recognised engineering journals, indicating that our students are amongst the finest young engineers in the world. In addition to this, you will take modules on advanced Aeronautical Engineering topics and be able to choose from some optional modules.

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Non-Linear Solid Mechanics 4
  • Aircraft Structures 4
  • Aeromechanics 4
  • Fluid Mechanics 4
  • Turbomachinery and Propulsion 4.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, students are encouraged to apply during their degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. Students may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. Students are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s Languages For All scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist in finding placement opportunities for you through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others.     

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the degrees formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that you will develop (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course). In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance starts to shift in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. Lectures still play an important role in supporting you in developing your knowledge and skills, with an average of 10 hours a week. The frequency of laboratory practical sessions and design activities remains similar, but the tasks become more open-ended.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning continues in the final year, where fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of six hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the research and development project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with who you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H214 Engineering (Civil) BEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H214
Degree BEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 3 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The BEng Civil Engineering degree is a high-quality three-year degree designed to offer you the knowledge and skills necessary to join engineering teams on graduation. It is complementary to the four-year Durham MEng, and transfer is possible between the courses up to the end of the second year.  It is important to highlight that you also can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy.  

In the first two years, the BEng covers the same broad base of engineering education as the MEng degree. The BEng prepares you for an exciting career in modern engineering, with the flexibility to respond to changing technologies.

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve a specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices have previously included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Civil Engineering.

You will take four Civil Engineering taught modules plus an individual technical project (which is equivalent to two modules). For your project, which is the highlight of most of our students’ degree, you will work closely with a project supervisor and will be responsible for planning, design and manufacture of equipment, experimentation, analysis and reporting of your results. Our Civil students undertake a major design project supervised by practising Civil engineers (plus an academic supervisor), which will allow you to develop new skills and knowledge in various areas, from bridge design to geotechnical structures. 

Compulsory modules: 

  • BEng Engineering Project
  • Geotechnics 3
  • Structures and Geomatics 3
  • Environmental Engineering 3
  • Civil Design 3.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020.

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, you are encouraged to apply during your degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. You may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. You are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s 'Languages For All' scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist you in finding placement opportunities through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others. 

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the degree's formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the degree, as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that the course develops in you (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course).

In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. In the third year, fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of eight hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the technical project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects, including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H211 Engineering (Civil) MEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H211
Degree MEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 4 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MEng Civil Engineering degree is a four-year first degree that delivers the breadth and depth that you will need in the world of engineering. It is designed to produce graduates who will go on and lead engineering teams. Your first two years offer you a broad-based engineering education. You then specialise into Civil Engineering in your third and fourth years.  It is important to highlight that you can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first three years of your degree at Durham you will take six modules, the year is divided into three terms and there are examinations at the end of each year.  The taught modules in the final year are smaller to reflect their specialist content – you will take six of these modules plus a dissertation, or final year, project. 

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices in the past have included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules, but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Civil Engineering.

Our Civil Engineering students undertake a major design project supervised by practising civil engineers (plus an academic supervisor), which will allow you to develop new skills and knowledge in various areas, from bridge design to geotechnical structures. Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics such as land surveying.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Structures and Geomatics 3
  • Geotechnics 3
  • Environmental Engineering 3
  • Civil Design 3
  • Materials 3
  • Solid Mechanics 3.

Year 4

The highlight of the degree for many of our students is the final year project. This activity, which is half the year, involves working closely with an academic supervisor on an area of cutting-edge research and development. The best student projects have been featured in internationally recognised engineering journals, indicating that our students are amongst the finest young engineers in the world. In addition to this, you will take modules on advanced Civil Engineering topics and be able to choose from some optional modules.

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Advanced Geotechnical Engineering 4
  • Planning and Contract Law 4
  • Structural Design 4
  • Structures 4
  • Hydrology and Water Resources 4.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020.

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, students are encouraged to apply during their degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. Students may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. Students are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s Languages For All scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist in finding placement opportunities for you through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others.     

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the degrees formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that you will develop (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course). In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance starts to shift in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. Lectures still play an important role in supporting you in developing your knowledge and skills, with an average of 10 hours a week. The frequency of laboratory practical sessions and design activities remains similar, but the tasks become more open-ended.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning continues in the final year, where fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of six hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the research and development project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with who you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H514 Engineering (Electrical) BEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H514
Degree BEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 3 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The BEng Electrical Engineering degree is a high-quality three-year degree designed to offer you the knowledge and skills necessary to join engineering teams on graduation. It is complementary to the four-year Durham MEng, and transfer is possible between the courses up to the end of the second year.  It is important to highlight that you also can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first two years, the BEng covers the same broad base of engineering education as the MEng degree. The BEng prepares you for an exciting career in modern engineering, with the flexibility to respond to changing technologies.

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve a specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices have previously included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Electrical Engineering.

You will take four Electrical Engineering taught modules plus an individual technical project (which is equivalent to two modules). For your project, which is the highlight of most of our students’ degree, you will work closely with a project supervisor and will be responsible for planning, design and manufacture of equipment, experimentation, analysis and reporting of your results. Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics such as industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry.

Compulsory modules: 

  • BEng Engineering Project
  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Power Semiconductor Devices 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3.

 

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020.

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, you are encouraged to apply during your degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. You may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. You are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s 'Languages For All' scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist you in finding placement opportunities through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others. 

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the degree's formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the degree, as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that the course develops in you (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course).

In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. In the third year, fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of eight hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the technical project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects, including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H511 Engineering (Electrical) MEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H511
Degree MEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 4 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MEng Electrical Engineering degree is a four-year first degree that delivers the breadth and depth that you will need in the world of engineering. It is designed to produce graduates who will go on and lead engineering teams. Your first two years offer you a broad-based engineering education. You then specialise into Electrical Engineering in your third and fourth years. It is important to highlight that you can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first three years of your degree at Durham you will take six modules, the year is divided into three terms and there are examinations at the end of each year.  The taught modules in the final year are smaller to reflect their specialist content – you will take six of these modules plus a dissertation, or final year, project. 

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices in the past have included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules, but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Electrical Engineering.

You will take five taught modules covering important aspects of Electrical Engineering.  The sixth module is a major team design project, where you consider your design challenge as a product and do everything from basic market research to design for manufacture.  These design projects span our different third year specialisms so you will be working with students from other engineering disciplines – much like you will do when working as a graduate engineer.  Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics from such as industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry. 

Compulsory modules: 

  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Power Semiconductor Devices 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3
  • Engineering Design 3.

Year 4

The highlight of the degree for many of our students is the final year project. This activity, which is half the year in most streams, involves working closely with an academic supervisor on an area of cutting-edge research and development. The best student projects have been featured in internationally recognised engineering journals, indicating that our students are amongst the finest young engineers in the world. In addition to this, you will take modules on advanced Electrical Engineering topics and be able to choose from some optional modules.

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Renewable Energy Technologies 4
  • Future Vehicles 4
  • Electrical Energy Conversion 4
  • Power Electronics 4
  • Smart Energy Networks 4.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, students are encouraged to apply during their degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. Students may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. Students are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s Languages For All scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist in finding placement opportunities for you through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others.     

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the degrees formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that you will develop (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course). In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance starts to shift in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. Lectures still play an important role in supporting you in developing your knowledge and skills, with an average of 10 hours a week. The frequency of laboratory practical sessions and design activities remains similar, but the tasks become more open-ended.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning continues in the final year, where fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of six hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the research and development project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with who you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H714 Engineering (Electronic) BEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H714
Degree BEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 3 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The BEng Electronic Engineering degree is a high-quality three-year degree designed to offer you the knowledge and skills necessary to join engineering teams on graduation. It is complementary to the four-year Durham MEng, and transfer is possible between the courses up to the end of the second year.  It is important to highlight that you also can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first two years, the BEng covers the same broad base of engineering education as the MEng degree. The BEng prepares you for an exciting career in modern engineering, with the flexibility to respond to changing technologies.

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve a specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices have previously included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Electronic Engineering.

You will take four Electronic Engineering taught modules plus an individual technical project (which is equivalent to two modules). For your project, which is the highlight of most of our students’ degree, you will work closely with a project supervisor and will be responsible for planning, design and manufacture of equipment, experimentation, analysis and reporting of your results. Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics such as industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry.

Compulsory modules: 

  • BEng Engineering Project
  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3
  • Digital Electronics and Digital Signal Processing 3.

 

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020.

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, you are encouraged to apply during your degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. You may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. You are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s 'Languages For All' scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist you in finding placement opportunities through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others. 

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the degree's formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the degree, as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that the course develops in you (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course).

In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. In the third year, fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of eight hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the technical project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects, including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H711 Engineering (Electronic) MEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H711
Degree MEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 4 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MEng Electronic Engineering degree is a four-year first degree that delivers the breadth and depth that you will need in the world of engineering. It is designed to produce graduates who will go on and lead engineering teams. Your first two years offer you a broad-based engineering education. You then specialise into Electronic Engineering in your third and fourth years. It is important to highlight that you can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first three years of your degree at Durham you will take six modules, the year is divided into three terms and there are examinations at the end of each year.  The taught modules in the final year are smaller to reflect their specialist content – you will take six of these modules plus a dissertation, or final year, project. 

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices in the past have included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules, but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Electronic Engineering.

You will take five taught modules covering important aspects of Electronic Engineering.  The sixth module is a major team design project, where you consider your design challenge as a product and do everything from basic market research to design for manufacture.  These design projects span our different third year specialisms so you will be working with students from other engineering disciplines – much like you will do when working as a graduate engineer.  Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics from such as industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry. 

Compulsory modules: 

  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Engineering Design 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3
  • Digital Electronics and Digital Signal Processing 3
  • Semiconductor Physics and Devices 3.

 

Year 4

The highlight of the degree for many of our students is the final year project. This activity, which is half the year in most streams, involves working closely with an academic supervisor on an area of cutting-edge research and development. The best student projects have been featured in internationally recognised engineering journals, indicating that our students are amongst the finest young engineers in the world. In addition to this, you will take modules on advanced Electronic Engineering topics.

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Radio and Digital Communications 4
  • Digital Signal Processing 4
  • Communications Networks 4
  • Advanced Electronics Measurement 4
  • Advanced Electronics 4
  • Photonics 4.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020

Study Abroad

 

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, students are encouraged to apply during their degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. Students may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. Students are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s Languages For All scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist in finding placement opportunities for you through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others.     

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the degrees formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that you will develop (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course). In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance starts to shift in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. Lectures still play an important role in supporting you in developing your knowledge and skills, with an average of 10 hours a week. The frequency of laboratory practical sessions and design activities remains similar, but the tasks become more open-ended.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning continues in the final year, where fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of six hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the research and development project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with who you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H314 Engineering (Mechanical) BEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H314
Degree BEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 3 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The BEng Mechanical Engineering degree is a high-quality three-year degree designed to offer you the knowledge and skills necessary to join engineering teams on graduation. It is complementary to the four-year Durham MEng, and transfer is possible between the courses up to the end of the second year.  It is important to highlight that you also can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first two years, the BEng covers the same broad base of engineering education as the MEng degree. The BEng prepares you for an exciting career in modern engineering, with the flexibility to respond to changing technologies.

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer-Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve a specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices have previously included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Mechanical Engineering.

You will take four Mechanical Engineering taught modules plus an individual technical project (which is equivalent to two modules). For your project, which is the highlight of most of our students’ degree, you will work closely with a project supervisor and will be responsible for planning, design and manufacture of equipment, experimentation, analysis and reporting of your results. Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics such as industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry.

Compulsory modules: 

  • BEng Engineering Project
  • Materials 3
  • Solid Mechanics 3
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3
  • Electrical Engineering 3.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020.

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, you are encouraged to apply during your degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. You may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. You are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s 'Languages For All' scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist you in finding placement opportunities through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others. 

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the degree's formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the degree, as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that the course develops in you (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course).

In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The shifts in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. In the third year, fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of eight hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the technical project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects, including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H311 Engineering (Mechanical) MEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H311
Degree MEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 4 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MEng Mechanical Engineering degree is a four-year first degree that delivers the breadth and depth that you will need in the world of engineering. It is designed to produce graduates who will go on and lead engineering teams. Your first two years offer you a broad-based engineering education. You then specialise into Mechanical Engineering in your third and fourth years. It is important to highlight that you can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first three years of your degree at Durham you will take six modules, the year is divided into three terms and there are examinations at the end of each year.  The taught modules in the final year are smaller to reflect their specialist content – you will take six of these modules plus a dissertation, or final year, project. 

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices in the past have included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules, but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Mechanical Engineering.

You will take five taught modules covering important aspects of Mechanical Engineering.  The sixth module is a major team design project, where you consider your design challenge as a product and do everything from basic market research to design for manufacture.  These design projects span our different third year specialisms so you will be working with students from other engineering disciplines – much like you will do when working as a graduate engineer.  Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics from such as industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry. 

Compulsory modules:

  • Materials 3
  • Solid Mechanics 3
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3
  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Engineering Design 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3.

 

Year 4

The highlight of the degree for many of our students is the final year project. This activity, which is half the year in most streams, involves working closely with an academic supervisor on an area of cutting-edge research and development. The best student projects have been featured in internationally recognised engineering journals, indicating that our students are amongst the finest young engineers in the world. In addition to this, you will take modules on advanced Mechanical Engineering topics and be able to choose from some optional modules.

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Fluid Mechanics 4
  • Turbomachinery and Propulsion 4
  • Renewable Energy Technologies 4
  • Future Vehicles 4
  • Non-Linear Solid Mechanics 4.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020.

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, students are encouraged to apply during their degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. Students may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. Students are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s Languages For All scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist in finding placement opportunities for you through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others.     

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the degrees formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that you will develop (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course). In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance starts to shift in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. Lectures still play an important role in supporting you in developing your knowledge and skills, with an average of 10 hours a week. The frequency of laboratory practical sessions and design activities remains similar, but the tasks become more open-ended.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning continues in the final year, where fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of six hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the research and development project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with who you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H811 Engineering (Renewable Energy) MEng Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code H811
Degree MEng
Professional accreditation This programme is accredited on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 4 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
A*AA
BTEC
D*DD
International Baccalaureate
38
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MEng Renewable Energy degree is a four-year first degree that delivers the breadth and depth that you will need in the world of engineering. It is designed to produce graduates who will go on and lead engineering teams. Your first two years offer you a broad-based engineering education. You then specialise into Renewable Energy in your third and fourth years. It is important to highlight that you can transfer between the different Engineering programmes that we offer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronic, etc.) up until the end of the second year, provided that you meet the relevant progression requirements.  We believe that students should make an informed decision about their futures and allowing our students to transfer between programmes, once they understand the different disciplines, demonstrates our commitment to this and the Department’s General Engineering philosophy. 

In the first three years of your degree at Durham you will take six modules, the year is divided into three terms and there are examinations at the end of each year.  The taught modules in the final year are smaller to reflect their specialist content – you will take six of these modules plus a dissertation, or final year, project. 

Year 1

You will study four modules in engineering, one in mathematics and one optional module. In your engineering modules, you will receive instruction in the use of 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) software (e.g. SolidWorks), be taught how to implement engineering algorithms into computer code (specifically in C and MATLAB) and take part in a number of practical labs. You will also take part in a group design activity where you have to design, build and test a device to solve specific engineering challenge. Recent examples include miniature hydroelectric generators and chain-climbing robots. On the course, you also attend lectures, problem classes and supervisions with academic staff.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 1
  • Electronic and Electrical Systems 1
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 1
  • Engineering Practice 1
  • Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists

And one free elective.

The optional (free elective) module may be selected from anything that will fit the timetable and for which you meet the necessary prerequisites. Popular choices in the past have included ‘Introduction to Programming’, ‘Computational Thinking’ and a range of different language modules, but some students have taken modules in History or Poetry.

Year 2

Engineering and mathematics now occupy the full six modules in the timetable.

You will undertake a major design project as part of a small team with guidance from an academic supervisor and an ‘Industrial Tutor’ (an engineer from industry). This lets you put into practice the skills and knowledge that you have developed in your lectures. The end result is a detailed design report and a series of CAD drawings good enough to manufacture a device from.

Compulsory modules: 

  • Engineering Mathematics 2
  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 2
  • Solid Mechanics and Structures 2
  • Electrical Engineering 2
  • Electronics 2
  • Engineering Design 2.

Year 3

At this point in the degree you will specialise into Renewable Energy.

You will take five taught modules covering important aspects of Renewable Energy.  The sixth module is a major team design project, where you consider your design challenge as a product and do everything from basic market research to design for manufacture.  These design projects span our different third year specialisms so you will be working with students from other engineering disciplines – much like you will do when working as a graduate engineer.  Practical skills, in addition to the weekly laboratory sessions, cover topics from such as industrial problem solving with interaction with local industry. 

Compulsory modules:

  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 3
  • Electrical Engineering 3
  • Engineering Design 3
  • Control and Signal Processing 3.

Plus

  • Materials 3
  • Solid Mechanics 3

Or

  • Power Semiconductor Devices 3
  • Electronics and Communications 3

Year 4

The highlight of the degree for many of our students is the final year project. This activity, which is half the year in most streams, involves working closely with an academic supervisor on an area of cutting-edge research and development. The best student projects have been featured in internationally recognised engineering journals, indicating that our students are amongst the finest young engineers in the world. In addition to this, you will take modules on advanced Renewable Energy topics and be able to choose from some optional modules.

Compulsory modules: 

  • MEng Research and Development Project (or MEng Technical Project and Engineering into Schools)
  • Renewable Energy Technologies 4
  • Future Vehicles 4
  • Electrical Energy Conversion 4
  • Smart Energy Networks 4
  • Decarbonisation of Heating and Cooling 4.

We review course structures and core content (in light of e.g. external and student feedback) every year and will publish finalised core requirements for 2021 entry from September 2020

Study Abroad

Engineering is an increasingly international discipline and living and working in another country is a valuable addition to your CV. For this reason, students are encouraged to apply during their degree for a year-long placement with one of the Engineering Department's or the University's international partners, as an additional year of study. Students may study in English at some of the partner universities, whereas at others foreign language skills are essential. Students are fully supported by the Department both during the application process and during the year abroad. Language tuition is available in the first year in a range of languages as free elective modules and in other years through the University’s Languages For All scheme.

Placement Year/Year in Industry

Practical engineering experience is invaluable and to recognise this you can choose to take a year-long placement in industry between your second and third year.  The Department will assist in finding placement opportunities for you through the Industrial Partnership Committee (IPC) which consists of local, national and multi-national companies, including: British Airways, BP, IBM and Caterpillar, amongst many others.

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

The course is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, problem classes, practical and design activities. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular field of study and identify the main underpinning engineering concepts in that area. Problem classes then provide opportunities for smaller groups to work through practical examples, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the degrees formal contact hours. Finally, practical classes allow you to gain direct experience of practical and interpretative skills through laboratory classes, design activities and a Professional Engineering Applications Course (PEAC).

The balance of these types of activities changes as you develop your knowledge and your ability as an independent learner. This is one of the key attributes that you will develop (thereby preparing you for work or further study once you have completed the course). In the first two years, you will typically attend 12 hours a week of lectures (two hours per module) and have three hours of practical classes or design activities each week plus problem classes and small group supervision. In the first year there is a one-week full-time compulsory PEAC course and at the end of the second year there is a two-week full-time practical course. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge.

The balance starts to shift in the third year, as you develop your abilities as an independent learner. Lectures still play an important role in supporting you in developing your knowledge and skills, with an average of 10 hours a week. The frequency of laboratory practical sessions and design activities remains similar, but the tasks become more open-ended.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning continues in the final year, where fewer modules comprise lectures, with an average of six hours a week. This emphasis on using the independent study and research skills developed in earlier years is continued through the research and development project that you will undertake. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with who you will have weekly one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area resulting in a significant piece of independent research.

Throughout the course, you also have access to an academic adviser who will provide you with academic support and guidance. You will meet regularly with your academic supervisor throughout your degree and they act as your first point-of-contact for any academic queries. In addition to this, all members of teaching staff have weekly tutorial hours when they are available to meet on a ‘sign-up’ basis. The Department also has an exciting programme of research seminars and talks from industrial companies which undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – A*AA including Mathematics and Physics.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – D*DD and Mathematics at grade A at A level (or equivalent) are required.

IB Diploma score – 38 with 666 in higher level subjects including Mathematics and Physics.

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study.
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programmeoffers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take an International Foundation Year pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £27,350.00 per year
Home Student £9,250.00 per year
Island Student £9,250.00 per year
International non-EU Student £27,350.00 per year

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

H1K609 New and Renewable Energy MSc Postgraduate Taught  2020

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

Degree MSc
Professional accreditation IET and IMechE
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 1 year
Start Date October
Location Durham City
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MSc in New and Renewable Energy is designed to equip our graduates with the skills required to meet the growing challenge to achieve energy and environmental sustainability through the application of new and renewable energy technologies. The course aims to enable students to develop the capacity to solve problems across the traditional Engineering boundaries and to have an appreciation of complete energy systems from source to the end-user, to have knowledge of the relevant technologies and to understand the interactions between them. The course also provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in research, development, design and project management through individual and team-based project work.

Course Structure

The programme consists of five core modules to provide advanced engineering education in New and Renewable Energy technologies alongside an optional module that allows students to increase their understanding in an area suited to their interests and needs. In addition to these taught modules, you will also complete a group design project and a major, individual research and development project working closely with an academic in your chosen subject area.

Core taught content:

  • Renewable Energy Technologies
  • Future Vehicles
  • Electrical Energy Conversion
  • Smart Energy Networks
  • Decarbonisation of Heating and Cooling

Optional taught content:

Students select one optional module from the following topics:

  • Internet of Everything
  • Optimisation

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full-time course beginning at the start of the academic year and finishing with submitting a report and completing an oral examination on your chosen research and development project. The course consists of four core modules to provide a solid education in a broad range of New and Renewable Energy technologies. A choice of one from two optional modules allows you to choose a study course most suited to your interests and needs. The modules include lecture courses, a group design project and an individual research and development project.

You will select one of two optional modules. These modules typically include 38 hours of lectures in addition to coursework and laboratory experiments, allowing you to develop research skills in parallel with lectures. The modules are designed to increase your understanding in either thermodynamics and fluid mechanics or electrical engineering. You are advised to select the module which you feel would best support your learning needs.

The core lecture modules typically involve 38 hours of lectures and cover topics such as electricity generation from renewable and conventional sources, transmission and distribution (including smart networks), electricity markets and optimisation, and low carbon technologies (including electrical vehicles).

The third core module is a group design project focused on a realistic application of renewable energy technology. You will gain experience of teamwork, presentation skills and project management, as well as the technical aspects of engineering design. You will also benefit from this opportunity to develop their research skills in preparation for your individual research and development project.

A major individual research and development project completes the core modules. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with your supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure the project is on track. At the end of the project, you are required to submit a final report on your work, in the style of a research paper. You are also required to prepare and present a poster to encourage further development of your ability to present your work to staff and peers. An oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to you regarding the technical aspects of your project. You should expect to have up to 15 hours of contact time with your supervisors plus over 500 hours of research work and preparation, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of your research projects.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

To be admitted to the MSc programme in New and Renewable Energy, you need the equivalent of a UK Honours degree to at least an upper second class standard. This should normally be in an appropriate Engineering or Engineering-related subject including modules in electrical engineering and/or thermodynamics although in some instances we can consider industrial or other relevant experience if you have a different first degree.

 

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

The tuition fees for 2020/21 academic year have not yet been finalised, they will be displayed here once approved.

The tuition fees shown are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/

H1K609 New and Renewable Energy MSc Postgraduate Taught  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

Degree MSc
Professional accreditation IET and IMechE
Mode of study Part Time + Full Time
Duration 1 year
Start Date October
Location Durham City
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The MSc in New and Renewable Energy is designed to equip our graduates with the skills required to meet the growing challenge to achieve energy and environmental sustainability through the application of new and renewable energy technologies. The course aims to enable students to develop the capacity to solve problems across the traditional Engineering boundaries and to have an appreciation of complete energy systems from source to the end-user, to have knowledge of the relevant technologies and to understand the interactions between them. The course also provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in research, development, design and project management through individual and team-based project work.

Course Structure

The programme consists of five core modules to provide advanced engineering education in New and Renewable Energy technologies alongside an optional module that allows students to increase their understanding in an area suited to their interests and needs. In addition to these taught modules, you will also complete a group design project and a major, individual research and development project working closely with an academic in your chosen subject area.

Core taught content:

  • Renewable Energy Technologies
  • Future Vehicles
  • Electrical Energy Conversion
  • Smart Energy Networks
  • Decarbonisation of Heating and Cooling

Optional taught content:

Students select one optional module from the following topics:

  • Internet of Everything
  • Optimisation

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full-time course beginning at the start of the academic year and finishing with submitting a report and completing an oral examination on your chosen research and development project. The course consists of four core modules to provide a solid education in a broad range of New and Renewable Energy technologies. A choice of one from two optional modules allows you to choose a study course most suited to your interests and needs. The modules include lecture courses, a group design project and an individual research and development project.

You will select one of two optional modules. These modules typically include 38 hours of lectures in addition to coursework and laboratory experiments, allowing you to develop research skills in parallel with lectures. The modules are designed to increase your understanding in either thermodynamics and fluid mechanics or electrical engineering. You are advised to select the module which you feel would best support your learning needs.

The core lecture modules typically involve 38 hours of lectures and cover topics such as electricity generation from renewable and conventional sources, transmission and distribution (including smart networks), electricity markets and optimisation, and low carbon technologies (including electrical vehicles).

The third core module is a group design project focused on a realistic application of renewable energy technology. You will gain experience of teamwork, presentation skills and project management, as well as the technical aspects of engineering design. You will also benefit from this opportunity to develop their research skills in preparation for your individual research and development project.

A major individual research and development project completes the core modules. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with your supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure the project is on track. At the end of the project, you are required to submit a final report on your work, in the style of a research paper. You are also required to prepare and present a poster to encourage further development of your ability to present your work to staff and peers. An oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to you regarding the technical aspects of your project. You should expect to have up to 15 hours of contact time with your supervisors plus over 500 hours of research work and preparation, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of your research projects.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

To be admitted to the MSc programme in New and Renewable Energy, you need the equivalent of a UK Honours degree to at least an upper second class standard. This should normally be in an appropriate Engineering or Engineering-related subject including modules in electrical engineering and/or thermodynamics although in some instances we can consider industrial or other relevant experience if you have a different first degree.

 

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £25,970.00 per year
Home Student £11,550.00 per year
Island Student £11,550.00 per year
International non-EU Student £25,970.00 per year

Part Time Fees

EU Student £14,300.00 per year
Home Student £6,400.00 per year
Island Student £6,400.00 per year
International non-EU Student £14,300.00 per year

The tuition fees shown are for one complete academic year of study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/

H1K909 Electronic and Electrical Engineering MSc Postgraduate Taught  2020

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

Degree MSc
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 1 year (full time)
Start Date October
Location Durham City
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The main objective of the course is to educate you in the key engineering aspects of electronic and electrical engineering, enabling you to undertake responsible, creative, challenging and stimulating posts in industry or research.

The course covers the key areas of electronic and electrical engineering. In addition to the technical background provided in these subjects, hands-on experience is gained through a major individual Research and Development project, a group design project and a supporting laboratory programme.

Course Structure

The course consists of five core modules to provide an advanced engineering education in Electrical (List A) or Electronic (List B) Engineering alongside an optional module that allows students to increase their understanding in an area suited to their interests and needs.  Students choose to follow List A or List B as described below.  In addition to these taught modules, you will also complete a group design project and a major, individual research and development project working closely with an academic in your chosen subject area.

Electrical Engineering core taught content (List A):

  • Renewable Energy Technologies
  • Future Vehicles
  • Electrical Energy Conversion
  • Power Electronics
  • Smart Energy Networks

Electronic Engineering core taught content (List B):

  • Radio and Digital Communications
  • Digital Signal Processing
  • Communications Systems
  • Microwave Engineering
  • Opto and Nanoelectronics

Optional taught content:

Students select one optional module from the following topics:

  • Internet of everything
  • Optimisation

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full-time degree course that runs from October to the end of August the following year.

For the Group Design Module, each group is supervised by one or more members of staff, and guided through the various stages of design. The principal learning outcome from this module is for you to understand the stages in the design of electronic and electrical systems. You should expect to have around 20 hours of contact time with their academic supervisors over the course of the design module.

A major individual research and development project is also undertaken on the course. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project you are required to submit a final report on their work, in the style of a research paper. You are also required to prepare and to present a poster to allow an assessment to be made of your understanding and ability to present your work, plus an oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to you regarding the technical aspects of your project. You should expect to have around 25 hours of contact time with your supervisors plus 500 hours of practical work, supported by the Department’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of the research project.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A second class honours degree (typically equivalent to UK 2:1 Honours) or better in a subject which includes a significant electronic or electrical engineering content.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

The tuition fees for 2020/21 academic year have not yet been finalised, they will be displayed here once approved.

The tuition fees shown are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/

H1K909 Electronic and Electrical Engineering MSc Postgraduate Taught  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

Degree MSc
Mode of study Part Time + Full Time
Duration 1 year (full time)
Start Date October
Location Durham City
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

The main objective of the course is to educate you in the key engineering aspects of electronic and electrical engineering, enabling you to undertake responsible, creative, challenging and stimulating posts in industry or research.

The course covers the key areas of electronic and electrical engineering. In addition to the technical background provided in these subjects, hands-on experience is gained through a major individual Research and Development project, a group design project and a supporting laboratory programme.

Course Structure

The course consists of five core modules to provide an advanced engineering education in Electrical (List A) or Electronic (List B) Engineering alongside an optional module that allows students to increase their understanding in an area suited to their interests and needs.  Students choose to follow List A or List B as described below.  In addition to these taught modules, you will also complete a group design project and a major, individual research and development project working closely with an academic in your chosen subject area.

Electrical Engineering core taught content (List A):

  • Renewable Energy Technologies
  • Future Vehicles
  • Electrical Energy Conversion
  • Power Electronics
  • Smart Energy Networks

Electronic Engineering core taught content (List B):

  • Radio and Digital Communications
  • Digital Signal Processing
  • Communications Systems
  • Microwave Engineering
  • Opto and Nanoelectronics

Optional taught content:

Students select one optional module from the following topics:

  • Internet of everything
  • Optimisation

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full-time degree course that runs from October to the end of August the following year.

For the Group Design Module, each group is supervised by one or more members of staff, and guided through the various stages of design. The principal learning outcome from this module is for you to understand the stages in the design of electronic and electrical systems. You should expect to have around 20 hours of contact time with their academic supervisors over the course of the design module.

A major individual research and development project is also undertaken on the course. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with the supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project you are required to submit a final report on their work, in the style of a research paper. You are also required to prepare and to present a poster to allow an assessment to be made of your understanding and ability to present your work, plus an oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to you regarding the technical aspects of your project. You should expect to have around 25 hours of contact time with your supervisors plus 500 hours of practical work, supported by the Department’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of the research project.

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A second class honours degree (typically equivalent to UK 2:1 Honours) or better in a subject which includes a significant electronic or electrical engineering content.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £25,970.00 per year
Home Student £11,550.00 per year
Island Student £11,550.00 per year
International non-EU Student £25,970.00 per year

Part Time Fees

EU Student £14,300.00 per year
Home Student £6,400.00 per year
Island Student £6,400.00 per year
International non-EU Student £14,300.00 per year

The tuition fees shown are for one complete academic year of study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/

H1KA09 Advanced Mechanical Engineering MSc Postgraduate Taught  2020

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

Degree MSc
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 1 year
Start Date 2 October
Location Durham City
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

This course will provide graduates with advanced knowledge and understanding of Mechanical Engineering in three ways.  Firstly, high-quality taught modules will introduce advanced Mechanical Engineering topics such as turbomachinery design, non-linear stress analysis, fluid mechanics, contact and friction.  Secondly, a substantial group design element will equip students with the ability to carry out advanced design in multinational teams using appropriate design standards and sophisticated engineering analysis tools.  Finally, a major research and development project allows the student to demonstrate the ability to work independently on a complex topic and demonstrate initiative in the solution of engineering challenges. 

Durham University has many researchers tackling problems relevant to industry and society. These are organised into three research challenges: sustainable infrastructure, future energy systems and next generation materials and microsystems. These are broad interdisciplinary challenges and will form the topics of many of the substantial projects that student will undertake.  Durham students are uniquely placed to take advantage of a broad range of expertise in a general engineering department. 

Course Structure

The course consists of five core modules to provide an advanced engineering education in Advanced Mechanical technologies alongside an optional module that allows students to increase their understanding in an area suited to their interests and needs. In addition to these taught modules you will also complete a group design project and a major, individual research and development project working closely with an academic in your chosen subject area.

Core taught content:

  • Non-linear solid mechanics
  • Fluid mechanics
  • Turbomachinery and propulsion
  • Renewable energy technologies
  • Future vehicles

 Optional taught content:

Students select one optional module from the following topics:

  • Internet of everything
  • Optimisation

 

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full-time course beginning at the start of the academic year and finishing with you submitting a report and completing an oral examination on your chosen research and development project. The course consists of four core modules to provide a solid education in a broad range of Advanced Mechanical Engineering technologies. A choice of one from two optional modules allows you to choose a study course most suited to your interests and needs. The modules include lecture courses, a group design project and an individual research and development project.

You will select one of two optional modules. These modules typically include 38 hours of lectures in addition to coursework and laboratory experiments, allowing you to develop research skills in parallel with lectures. The modules are designed to increase your understanding of either fluid dynamics and thermodynamics or applied mechanics.  You are advised to select the module which you feel would best support your learning needs.

The core lecture modules typically involve 38 hours of lectures and cover topics such as computational stress analysis, fluid mechanics and turbomachinery design. 

The third core module is a group design project focused on a realistic application of mechanical engineering technology. You will gain experience in teamwork, presentation skills and project management, as well as the technical aspects of engineering design. You also benefit from this opportunity to develop your research skills in preparation for your individual research and development project.

A major individual research and development project completes the core modules. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with your supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure the project is on track. At the end of the project, you are required to submit a final report on your work, in the style of a research paper. You are also required to prepare and present a poster to encourage further development of your ability to present your work to staff and peers. An oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to you regarding the technical aspects of your project. You should expect to have up to 15 hours of contact time with your supervisor plus over 500 hours of research work and preparation, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of your research projects

 

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

To be admitted to the MSc course in Advanced Mechanical Engineering, you need the equivalent of a UK Honours degree to at least an upper second class standard (2:1). This should normally be in an appropriate Engineering or Engineering-related subject including modules in Applied Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics and Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists.  Although in some instances we can consider industrial or other relevant experience if you have a different first degree.

If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take a pre-Masters pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.

 

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

The tuition fees for 2020/21 academic year have not yet been finalised, they will be displayed here once approved.

The tuition fees shown are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/

H1KA09 Advanced Mechanical Engineering MSc Postgraduate Taught  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

Degree MSc
Mode of study Part Time + Full Time
Duration 1 year
Start Date 2 October
Location Durham City
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

This course will provide graduates with advanced knowledge and understanding of Mechanical Engineering in three ways.  Firstly, high-quality taught modules will introduce advanced Mechanical Engineering topics such as turbomachinery design, non-linear stress analysis, fluid mechanics, contact and friction.  Secondly, a substantial group design element will equip students with the ability to carry out advanced design in multinational teams using appropriate design standards and sophisticated engineering analysis tools.  Finally, a major research and development project allows the student to demonstrate the ability to work independently on a complex topic and demonstrate initiative in the solution of engineering challenges. 

Durham University has many researchers tackling problems relevant to industry and society. These are organised into three research challenges: sustainable infrastructure, future energy systems and next generation materials and microsystems. These are broad interdisciplinary challenges and will form the topics of many of the substantial projects that student will undertake.  Durham students are uniquely placed to take advantage of a broad range of expertise in a general engineering department. 

Course Structure

The course consists of five core modules to provide an advanced engineering education in Advanced Mechanical technologies alongside an optional module that allows students to increase their understanding in an area suited to their interests and needs. In addition to these taught modules you will also complete a group design project and a major, individual research and development project working closely with an academic in your chosen subject area.

Core taught content:

  • Non-linear solid mechanics
  • Fluid mechanics
  • Turbomachinery and propulsion
  • Renewable energy technologies
  • Future vehicles

 Optional taught content:

Students select one optional module from the following topics:

  • Internet of everything
  • Optimisation

 

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full-time course beginning at the start of the academic year and finishing with you submitting a report and completing an oral examination on your chosen research and development project. The course consists of four core modules to provide a solid education in a broad range of Advanced Mechanical Engineering technologies. A choice of one from two optional modules allows you to choose a study course most suited to your interests and needs. The modules include lecture courses, a group design project and an individual research and development project.

You will select one of two optional modules. These modules typically include 38 hours of lectures in addition to coursework and laboratory experiments, allowing you to develop research skills in parallel with lectures. The modules are designed to increase your understanding of either fluid dynamics and thermodynamics or applied mechanics.  You are advised to select the module which you feel would best support your learning needs.

The core lecture modules typically involve 38 hours of lectures and cover topics such as computational stress analysis, fluid mechanics and turbomachinery design. 

The third core module is a group design project focused on a realistic application of mechanical engineering technology. You will gain experience in teamwork, presentation skills and project management, as well as the technical aspects of engineering design. You also benefit from this opportunity to develop your research skills in preparation for your individual research and development project.

A major individual research and development project completes the core modules. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with your supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure the project is on track. At the end of the project, you are required to submit a final report on your work, in the style of a research paper. You are also required to prepare and present a poster to encourage further development of your ability to present your work to staff and peers. An oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to you regarding the technical aspects of your project. You should expect to have up to 15 hours of contact time with your supervisor plus over 500 hours of research work and preparation, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of your research projects

 

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

To be admitted to the MSc course in Advanced Mechanical Engineering, you need the equivalent of a UK Honours degree to at least an upper second class standard (2:1). This should normally be in an appropriate Engineering or Engineering-related subject including modules in Applied Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics and Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists.  Although in some instances we can consider industrial or other relevant experience if you have a different first degree.

If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take a pre-Masters pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.

 

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

Full Time Fees

EU Student £25,970.00 per year
Home Student £11,550.00 per year
Island Student £11,550.00 per year
International non-EU Student £25,970.00 per year

Part Time Fees

EU Student £14,300.00 per year
Home Student £6,400.00 per year
Island Student £6,400.00 per year
International non-EU Student £14,300.00 per year

The tuition fees shown are for one complete academic year of study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/

H1KB09 Civil Engineering MSc Postgraduate Taught  2020

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

Degree MSc
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 1 year
Start Date 2 October
Location Durham City
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

This course will provide you with advanced knowledge and understanding of Civil Engineering in three ways.  Firstly high-quality taught modules will introduce advanced Civil Engineering topics such as structural design and highways engineering. Secondly, a substantial Civil design element will equip you with the ability to carry out structural design using appropriate design standards and numerical analysis tools.  Finally, a major research and development project allows you to demonstrate the ability to work independently on a complex topic and demonstrate initiative in the solution of engineering challenges. 

Durham University has many researchers tackling the challenge of ensuring sustainability and resilience of the infrastructure that underpins our society and economy.  This sustainable infrastructure will form the topic of many of the substantial projects that you will undertake and you are uniquely placed to take advantage of a broad range of expertise in a general engineering department. 

Course Structure

The course consists of six core modules to provide advanced engineering education in Civil Engineering technologies. In addition to these taught modules, you will also complete an individual civil design project working with professional engineers and a major, individual research and development project working closely with an academic in your chosen subject area

Core taught content:

  • Structural Design
  • Advanced Geotechnical Engineering
  • Structures 4
  • Transportation Infrastructure Engineering
  • Hydrology and Water Resources
  • Planning and Contract Law

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full-time course beginning at the start of the academic year and finishing with you submitting a report and completing an oral examination on your chosen research and development project. The course consists of four core modules to provide a solid education in a broad range of Civil Engineering technologies. A choice of one from two optional modules allows you to choose a study course most suited to your interests and needs. The modules include lecture courses, a design project and an individual research and development project.

You will select one of two optional modules. These modules typically include 40 hours of lectures in addition to coursework and laboratory experiments, allowing you to develop research skills in parallel with lectures. The modules are designed to increase your understanding in either analysis of structures and geomatics (land surveying and Geographical Information Systems) [Structures and Geomatics 3] or the remediating of polluted environments and open channel flows [Environmental Engineering 3]. You are advised to select the module which you feel would best support your learning needs.

The core lecture modules typically involve 38 hours of lectures and cover topics such as structural design, highways engineering, construction planning and law, the design and analysis of embankment and concrete dams, tunnels and foundation design for offshore structures and advanced knowledge of hydrology. 

The third core module is a group design project focused on a realistic application of civil engineering technology. You will gain experience of teamwork, presentation skills and project management, as well as the technical aspects of engineering design. You will also benefit from this opportunity to develop your research skills in preparation for your individual research and development project.

A major individual research and development project completes the core modules. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with your supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project you are required to submit a final report on your work, in the style of a research paper. You are also required to prepare and present a poster to encourage further development of your ability to present your work to staff and your peers. An oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to you regarding the technical aspects of your project. You should expect to have up to 15 hours of contact time with your supervisors plus over 500 hours of research work and preparation, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of your research projects

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

To be admitted to the MSc programme in Civil Engineering, you need the equivalent of a UK Honours degree to at least an upper second class standard (2:1). This should normally be in an appropriate Engineering or Engineering-related subject including modules in Geotechnics, Mechanics and Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists.  Although in some instances we can consider industrial or other relevant experience if you have a different first degree.

If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take a pre-Masters pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.

 

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

The tuition fees for 2020/21 academic year have not yet been finalised, they will be displayed here once approved.

The tuition fees shown are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/

H1KB09 Civil Engineering MSc Postgraduate Taught  2021

Essentials

Essentials

Please note: 2020-21 courses may be affected by Covid-19 and are therefore subject to change due to the ongoing impact of Covid-19. Summaries of course-specific changes resulting from the impact of Covid-19 will be provided to applicants during August 2020.

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

Degree MSc
Mode of study Part Time + Full Time
Duration 1 year
Start Date 2 October
Location Durham City
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/engineering
Download Download as a PDF

Course Summary

Course Summary

Description

This course will provide you with advanced knowledge and understanding of Civil Engineering in three ways.  Firstly high-quality taught modules will introduce advanced Civil Engineering topics such as structural design and highways engineering. Secondly, a substantial Civil design element will equip you with the ability to carry out structural design using appropriate design standards and numerical analysis tools.  Finally, a major research and development project allows you to demonstrate the ability to work independently on a complex topic and demonstrate initiative in the solution of engineering challenges. 

Durham University has many researchers tackling the challenge of ensuring sustainability and resilience of the infrastructure that underpins our society and economy.  This sustainable infrastructure will form the topic of many of the substantial projects that you will undertake and you are uniquely placed to take advantage of a broad range of expertise in a general engineering department. 

Course Structure

The course consists of six core modules to provide advanced engineering education in Civil Engineering technologies. In addition to these taught modules, you will also complete an individual civil design project working with professional engineers and a major, individual research and development project working closely with an academic in your chosen subject area

Core taught content:

  • Structural Design
  • Advanced Geotechnical Engineering
  • Structures 4
  • Transportation Infrastructure Engineering
  • Hydrology and Water Resources
  • Planning and Contract Law

Learning and Teaching

Course Learning and Teaching

This is a 12-month full-time course beginning at the start of the academic year and finishing with you submitting a report and completing an oral examination on your chosen research and development project. The course consists of four core modules to provide a solid education in a broad range of Civil Engineering technologies. A choice of one from two optional modules allows you to choose a study course most suited to your interests and needs. The modules include lecture courses, a design project and an individual research and development project.

You will select one of two optional modules. These modules typically include 40 hours of lectures in addition to coursework and laboratory experiments, allowing you to develop research skills in parallel with lectures. The modules are designed to increase your understanding in either analysis of structures and geomatics (land surveying and Geographical Information Systems) [Structures and Geomatics 3] or the remediating of polluted environments and open channel flows [Environmental Engineering 3]. You are advised to select the module which you feel would best support your learning needs.

The core lecture modules typically involve 38 hours of lectures and cover topics such as structural design, highways engineering, construction planning and law, the design and analysis of embankment and concrete dams, tunnels and foundation design for offshore structures and advanced knowledge of hydrology. 

The third core module is a group design project focused on a realistic application of civil engineering technology. You will gain experience of teamwork, presentation skills and project management, as well as the technical aspects of engineering design. You will also benefit from this opportunity to develop your research skills in preparation for your individual research and development project.

A major individual research and development project completes the core modules. This provides an open-ended challenge to each individual student, in collaboration with a staff supervisor. Regular meetings are held with your supervisor to discuss project progress and planning issues. A mid-term assessment is carried out to ensure project is on track. At the end of the project you are required to submit a final report on your work, in the style of a research paper. You are also required to prepare and present a poster to encourage further development of your ability to present your work to staff and your peers. An oral examination is held to allow detailed questions to be put to you regarding the technical aspects of your project. You should expect to have up to 15 hours of contact time with your supervisors plus over 500 hours of research work and preparation, supported by the School’s technicians and other research workers, over the course of your research projects

Apply

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

To be admitted to the MSc programme in Civil Engineering, you need the equivalent of a UK Honours degree to at least an upper second class standard (2:1). This should normally be in an appropriate Engineering or Engineering-related subject including modules in Geotechnics, Mechanics and Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists.  Although in some instances we can consider industrial or other relevant experience if you have a different first degree.

If you are an international student who does not meet the requirements for direct entry to this degree, you may be eligible to take a pre-Masters pathway programme at the Durham University International Study Centre.

 

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

Fees and Funding

Fees and Funding

The tuition fees for 2021/22 academic year have not yet been finalised, they will be displayed here once approved.

The tuition fees shown are for one complete academic year of study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Open Days and Visits

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Postgraduate Visits

PGVI or

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit/


From one of our alumni...

Alumni John Ranjith Ravindranayagam

As an international student, coming to a country where I have never been, it was a challenge. But right from the moment my fellow Durham students welcomed me at the airport to the moment I got my hands on my degree at the Durham Cathedral, I enjoyed every second of my stay at Durham. The colleges you opt for are like a family away from home.

Durham city is small but very beautiful. I would enjoy most of my study hours at the World Class Library with amazing facilities and librarians for support. Thank you Durham for the memories!

John Ranjith Ravindranayagam

M.Sc. Software Engineering Management 2011-2012

HSBC, India