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Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Staff and Governance

To contact the IMEMS administrative office please use the following details:

For the Administrator (maternity cover)

E: manager.imems@durham.ac.uk

T: 0191 334 6574

For the Administrative Assistant

E: admin.imems@durham.ac.uk

T: 0191 334 42974

Core Staff

The day-to-day running of IMEMS is the responsibility of the Core Executive Committee, comprising the Director and Associate Directors and the Administrator. 

Publication details

Hingley, Richard (2014). Postcolonial and global Rome: the genealogies of empire [Introduction, Part I.2]. In Globalisation and the Roman World: World History, Connectivity and Material Culture. Pitts, M. & Versluys, M.-J. Cambridge University Press. 32-46.

Author(s) from Durham

Abstract

This chapter reflects upon how contemporary scholarship in Roman studies relates to the politics of our world. Classical concepts of order, security and civilisation are deeply embedded within political understandings of the present. The Roman empire makes sense to us, in part, because our society sees contemporary values and aims embodied in the evidence from the classical past. This reflects the two-way relationship between classical times and the present. Our comprehensions of order, logic and justice are bound up with an inherited body of knowledge, much of which ultimately derives from the classical societies of Greece and Rome. We transform and develop these ideas, but we also build on them in the changing interpretations of the Roman empire that are created within archaeology and ancient history. Whatever academics may think about the strengths and weaknesses of globalisation theory, many of the concepts on which it draws have become common currency within the media and society in general. People in the Western world draw upon these ideas just as directly as their ancestors drew upon colonial concepts. This is why we cannot ignore globalisation when we explore the culture of imperial Rome.


Full Executive Committee

Our Full Executive Committee is made up of the Core Executive Committee, listed above, plus a number of executive members including:


International Advisory Board

We are extremely fortunate to have be able to call on the help and guidance of colleagues from around the world who help to shape and guide our direction, strategy and international reach. Our current Advisory Board members are: