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Durham University

Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS)

Event Archive

Performing Dante's Inferno, Then and Now - PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO PLANNED INDUSTRIAL ACTION, THIS LECTURE HAS NOW BEEN CANCELLED

14th March 2018, 18:00, Palace Green Library Learning Centre, Nick Havely

PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO PLANNED INDUSTRIAL ACTION, THIS LECTURE HAS NOW BEEN CANCELLED

Tickets for the lecture, wine reception, and tour of the exhibition 'Hell, Heaven and Hope: A Journey through life and the afterlife with Dante' will cost £12.50. Booking is essential.

The lecture, which will be illustrated throughout, begins by presenting some examples of how Hell was imagined and embodied in Dante's time. It then focuses on some of the 'dramatic' and 'theatrical' features of the Inferno itself and upon the subsequent medieval debate about the Commedia's circulation as a vernacular and 'popular' text. There will be some account of theatrical adaptations of the Inferno during the 17th and 18th centuries - when the poet's reputation was far less prominent than it came to be in the 19th century, as various staged adaptations helped to project the image of Dante as prophet of the Risorgimento and of Italian nationalism. Finally, we shall see how modern Infernos on stage and screen address the conflicts and anxieties of 20th- and 21st-century audiences and how the versatility of the poem continues to be apparent in an ever-wider range of performance media.

A new exhibition at Palace Green Library will follow the story of Dante’s Divine Comedy. Reflecting the entire human experience, Dante’s work considers the power of resilience through difficult times and ultimately offers a message of hope.

PLEASE NOTE THAT DUE TO PLANNED INDUSTRIAL ACTION, THIS LECTURE HAS NOW BEEN CANCELLED

Nick Havely is Emeritus Professor in the Department of English and Related Literature at the University of York, where he taught courses on English and Italian literature from 1971 to 2011. His recent work on Dante includes the Blackwell Guide to the poet (2007); two edited collections of essays on Dante's reception in the nineteenth century (Peter Lang, 2011 and Oxford University Press, 2012); and a book for which he received a Leverhulme Research Fellowship: Dante’s British Public: Readers and Texts, from the Fourteenth Century to the Present (Oxford University Press, 2014; paperback edition 2017).

Contact admin.imems@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.