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Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Event Archive

Conflict and the Religious Landscape: Cambrai and the Southern Netherlands, c. 1566-1621

25th February 2014, 17:30, Pemberton Lecture Room, PG21, Professor Andrew Spicer, Oxford Brookes University

to be followed by a drinks reception at the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre 

This event part of the IMEMS Power of Place seminar series for 2014. It is free and open to all, but attendees are asked to book a place at: https://www.dur.ac.uk/conference.booking/details/?id=261

Abstract: The frontier dioceses of the Southern Netherlands (Arras, Cambrai, Tournai and St Omer) were devastated in the late sixteenth century by a combination of confessional violence, rebellion against the government of Philip II of Spain and warfare with France. This paper is part of a broader study looking at the restoration of the religious landscape in this region during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. It also provides a different perspective on the implementation of the Tridentine reforms in the Spanish Netherlands, which have more often been seen through the lens of Antwerp and Brussels. Focusing on a particular aspect of this process, this paper addresses some of the difficulties and challenges posed in rebuilding the religious landscape.

Andrew Spicer is Professor of Early Modern European History at Oxford Brookes University. Until 2010, he was responsible for leading the AHRC project 'The Early Modern Parish Church and the Religious Landscape'. Prof. Spicer is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, the Society of Antiquaries, and the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. His current research focuses on the impact of the Reformation on the material culture and fabric of early modern religion, in particular religious architecture and attitudes towards the sanctity and holiness of places of worship. Amongst his co-edited volumes are Society and Culture in the Huguenot World, c. 1559-1685 (2002), Sacred Space in Early Modern Europe (2005), Public Opinion and Changing Identities in the Early Modern Netherlands (2007) and he is the editor of Lutheran Churches in Early Modern Europe (2012) and Parish Churches in the Early Modern World (forthcoming). He is the author of Calvinist churches in early modern Europe (2007) and is currently completing a monograph entitled Conflict and the Religious Landscape. Cambrai and the Southern Netherlands, c. 1566-1621.

Contact admin.imems@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.