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Institute of Advanced Study

Being Human: Classical Perspectives

This public lecture series explores views on what it means to be human that originated in ancient Greece or Rome and have continued to provide a defining point of reference for ‘modern' notions of humanity, from the Renaissance onwards. The international cast of experts addresses striking moments in classical and classicizing thought that have produced distinctive views on the human condition - from the view that our existence is shaped by the countervailing forces of chaos and order to the insights of Stoic philosophy, from notions of evil to Nietzsche's anti-humanist love for ancient Greece. These lectures thus highlight the extent to which ancient Greece and Rome and the classical tradition, i.e. the continuing presence of Greco-Roman antiquity in later centuries, have shaped Western notions of humanity and allow current debates and developments to be measured against past endeavours - at a time when the question of what it is to be human is (again) very much under the spotlight.

These public lectures are free and open to all

For more information please contact Dr Ingo Gildenhard

15 October 2008, 5.30pm, Lecture Room 20, Pemberton Building, Palace Green
Professor Michael Silk (King's College London)
27 October 2008, 5.30pm, Lecture Room 20, Pemberton Building, Palace Green
Professor Christopher Gill (Exeter University)
5 November 2008, 5.30pm, Ritson Room, Department of Classics
Dr Maude Vanhaelen (Warwick University)

28 January 2009, 5.30pm, This lecture has now been cancelled

Professor Ulrich Eigler (Zurich University)
11 February 2009, 5.30pm, Lecture Room 20, Pemberton Building, Palace Green
Professor Maurizio Bettini (University of Siena)
18 February 2009, 5.30pm, Ritson Room, Department of Classics
Professor Malcolm Heath (Leeds University)
25 February 2009, 5.30pm, Ritson Room, Department of Classics
Dr Martin Ruehl (Cambridge University)