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Durham University

Hatfield College

Research Events at Hatfield

Details of research events at Hatfield College will be posted here.


MCR Research Symposium

14th March 2016, 19:45 to 21:15, Hatfield College Chapel, Andrew Tibbs, Abigail Steed, Faisal Aldhayaan, Georgia Mackie and Laura Bennett

This is the second Research Symposium organised by the Hatfield MCR. The theme of the Symposium is Facing the Enemy, with four very interesting and varied talks, and the opportunity to ask questions at the end of the evening when drinks and nibbles will be provided.

FACING THE ENEMY: THE ORIENTATION OF ROMAN FORTS ON HADRIAN'S WALL by Andrew Tibbs

RESPONSES TO THE VIKINGS AS THE EMBODIMENT OF DIVINE RETRIBUTION AT THE TURN OF THE MILLENIUM by Abigail Steed
Divine vengeance for the sins of mankind was used as an explanation for misfortunes such as plague, war, famine and natural disasters throughout the middle ages. The prolonged Viking incursions into England around the turn of the first millennium AD are a particularly prominent example of this idea, as the invaders were continually represented as the agents of God's wrath against the sinful English. This turned the Vikings into a religious as well as a political and military problem, and I'm going to talk about how various secular and religious responses combined in efforts to fend them off, turn aside God's wrath and gain his mercy instead.'

IS IT STILL POSSIBLE FOR LAWS TO BE TRANSFERRED FROM ONE JURISDICTION TO ANOTHER AFTER THE ERA OF COLONISATION by Faisal Aldhayaan
This presentation will discuss one of the most debated topics in comparative law, the theory of 'legal transplant'. This is attributed to Prof. Alan Watson who details the continuing occurrence of legal borrowing, where laws and legal rules travel from one jurisdiction to another 'unconditionally'. His theory has attracted many criticisms, making his view classified as an optimist view. The pessimist view, was adopted by Prof Pierre Legrand, for whom the movement of rule is impossible, not only because it is conditioned by a number of economical, political and sociological factors, but because laws and legal rules are culturally driven. Thus, if the movement of rules survives the culture, it will not survive the language. Jaye Ellis supports Legrand's argument, for him: ‘legal cultures did not spring from the heads of gods but were built, demolished, and rebuilt by many hands over the course of many years in response to local conditions, isolated events, trends that surged through societies…etc.’1. This presentation shall attempt to squash the above criticism of Alan Watson's theory by giving examples that shows the possibility of laws to be transferred from one jurisdiction to another, without the element of force. In relation to our theme, Legrand and Ellis can be viewed as the enemies of globalisation who can be faced by supporting evidence of successful legal transplants.

1? Jaye Ellis,‘General principles and comparative law’ (2011) E.J.I.L.949 at 965


HERITAGE VS INTOLERANCE: CONTEMPORARY ICONOCLASM IN AFRICA by Georgia Mackie and Laura Bennett
Considering UNESCO's core purpose of peace, we consider intolerance to be the enemy of heritage. Using case studies from Mauritius and Mali, we demonstrate how intolerance to one community's heritage, is a threat and "enemy" to all heritage. By "facing" this enemy we consider the role of the international community in this face-off between cultures and emphasize that a threat to heritage anywhere is a threat to heritage everywhere.

Contact hatfield.mcracademic@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.