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Hatfield College

Crest & Motto

Images of the College crest have varied.

Original Crest

Original Crest

The original 1846 crest of Hatfield Hall (as it was called until 1919) consisted of the basic shield of Bishop Hatfield surrounded by a design converting the shield into a circular design and encircled by the Motto - Vel Primus Vel cum Primis. (The motto can be translated as The first or one of the first.)

Second Crest

Second Crest

In 1954 it was pointed out that the use of unregistered Arms was illegal and the use of Bishop Hatfield's Shield was inappropriate. The then Master said "Rightly or wrongly it has been used by Hatfield for more than a century. We ought to have no difficulty in obtaining the Heralds' permission to retain the shield which it has been flaunting de facto for such a long period." The shield was then described as per chevron argent and azure three lions rampant counter coloured. The College of Arms approved changes and the full College Crest from this point had a crown and plumes above the shield which was differentiated by an ermine border and a scrolled motto beneath. Though this looked very official, it was not easy to reproduce and not in keeping with the desire for cleaner lines and a more modern look.

Third College Crest

Third Crest

A former student Rodney Lucas drew the third crest which became generally used for stationery etc. This proved to be very popular and has served us well for the last two decades.

Fourth Crest

Fourth Crest

In 2005 the University undertook a re-branding exercise to create a "house-style" for all its communications and to project a more modern image. This has resulted in the 4th version of the College crest which includes all the key features of the past whilst presenting a more modern face to the outside world and proclaiming its fitness to meet the challenges of the 21st century.