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Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance

Conferences and Events

CALL FOR PAPERS

Sharing Economy of Islam beyond Islamic Finance: Re-constructing Collaborative and Disruptive Economy from Islamic Moral Economy Perspective

SASE Conference on ‘What's Next? Disruptive/Collaborative Economy or Business as Usual?’

Universite Claude Bernard, Lyon 1, France
29 June – 1 July 2017
Conference website

Call for Papers

As part of the Islamic economics movement, Islamic finance as a new and emergent pattern has demonstrated an unprecedented performance in terms of transforming the transactional or financial base of the Muslim societies and beyond, as large number of conventional financial institutions and several non-Muslim countries have engaged with Islamic finance in different levels. In its modern history since 1970s, we have witnessed the emergence of various Islamic financing and financial practices, and, also, Islamic financial and banking institutions along with Islamic social financing institutions such as waqf (pious foundations) and zakah (mandatory alms giving) funds. These include Islamic banks, takaful (Islamic insurance), Islamic microfinance institutions, Islamic crowdfunding platforms, Islamic mutual funds and asset management institutions etc.

As an emergent sector, theoretically Islamic finance practices are shaped by the normative world of Islam culminated and expressed through Islamic moral economy, which esssentialises a morally guided everyday practice of economy and finance in a submerged sense beyond the observed practices of Islamic banking and finance. This submergence or embeddedness in the social formation and normative world of Islam nature of Islamic moral economy implies that also non-economic and non-financial factors determine economic and financial process. The essential principles of Islamic economics and finance within this normative world is ‘risk-sharing’ and ‘profit-and-loss sharing’ along with the prohibition of interest, curbing of speculation and uncertainty, sustainable development, demand reduction and discouraging debt in particular and debt-based system in general in favour of real economy and asset based economy, de-commodification and non-fictitious products along with developing a human-centred development process.

As such normative and operational principles indicate, Islamic finance emerged within the Islamic moral economy frame as a counter hegemony and as part of double-movement to rescue land, labour, capital and human beings from the hegemonic domination. Therefore, sharing economy in the form of risk-sharing and profit-loss-sharing, demand reduction and hence de-commodification and non-fictitious commodities, asset based as opposed to debt-based, and sustainable development remains essential objectives of Islamic moral economy. Furthermore, sharing and distribution is sssestialised through social justice of Islam not only through voluntary action and also through normative and mandatory actions such as zakah (alms) giving. Therefore, in its origin, Islamic moral economy and finance suggests and essentialises sharing and distributive as well as disruptive and collaborative economy beyond contributing to financialisation as the current practice demonstrates.

Due to the prevailing political economy in the world, Islamic financial and banking institutions have emerged as the strong institutions of Islamic economics movements, while social and economic expectations as part of the aspirations of Islamic moral economy have been deferred. Thus, in the last forty years, Islamic financial institutions have flourished and now claims around US$2 trillion asset base, which in itself is a huge success against all the political and economic difficulties. However, the evaluation of the performance of Islamic finance sector shows that Islamic finance has been converging towards conventional financial practices and institutions through the shari’ah compliant practices. While intentionally this process generates compliant practices and respond to the financial needs within financial inclusion sense, there has been emerging tensions in terms of the outcomes of these institutions, as they have been criticized for failing to essentialise and embed the aspirations of Islamic moral economy by incorporating the conventional products and operations. Thus, despite growing interest in Islamic finance after the recent global financial crisis, the Islamic moral economy’s objectives of sharing and collaborative economy have been compromised and Islamic finance has become hybrid instruments of the hegemonic economy geared towards efficiency and profitability at the expense of the identified principles.

The recent trends in economic and financial world, however, identifies disruptive and collaborative economic and business practices as well as sharing and participating economic practices as the emerging practices against the hegemonic business and economic activities in the sense of counter-hegemony, which, as mentioned, are theoretically essentialised by Islamic moral economy. Globally, a new wave of peer-to-peer exchange of goods and services is shaking up established business models. Consumers show strong appetite for sharing homes, boats, cars, etc. at much smaller costs. Some examples of sharing business include Airbnb, CouchSurfing, Uber, Feastly, RelayRides, Hitch, SnapGoods, Poshmark, and Tradesy. While halal economy goes beyond Islamic finance, such sharing economy practices have not either essentialised by halal economy.

Since sharing economy in the form of collaborative and disruptive economy and financial practice is an essential pillar of Islamic moral economy and finance, one may argue that Islamic moral economy and finance contributes significantly to growing new phenomena of global sharing economy. However, we also acknowledge that despite the positive contribution can such economic practices do, one can also argue that sharing economy depletes certain cultural and moral values for the sake of profit motive.

This mini-conference, hence, invites

(i) conceptual and empirical contributions to explore and evaluate the emerging Islamic moral economy and finance practices in relation to the theoretical base in the form of sharing and disruptive and collaborative economy;
(ii) conceptual and empirical papers evaluating and exploring how sharing economy nature (risk-sharing and profit-loss-sharing), demand reduction and hence de-commodification and non-fictitious commodities, asset based, sustainable development in Islamic economics, finance and banking practices as opposed to debt-based conspicuous consumer culture in conventional economics can be developed and modelled within Islamic moral economy and finance;
(iii) conceptual and empirical papers critically examine how sharing economy and financing practices may contribute to growing commodification of values.

Hence, we propose to bring scholars together to discuss both sides of sharing and distributive/collaborative economy practices in the light of ideals and realities of Islamic moral economy and finance within the following themes:

(iv) Conceptualizing and theorising the Islamic Moral Economy within disruptive and collaborative economy

    • How the political economy of Islamic moral economy can be developed to suggest a different mode of production as a distinguishing nature of Islamic collaborative and disruptive economy?
    • What are the key principles of Islamic economic thought in generating disruptive and collaborative economy?
    • Why and how Islamic financial and banking practices have failed to articulate moral economy foundations leading for a sharing economy? In other words, how and why Islamic finance has given up sharing economy within collaborative and disruptive economy in its convergence with the hegemonic economy?
    • What strategies can be developed to re-embed Islamic finance for generating a sharing economy?

(v) Collaborative/distributive business from Islamic moral economy perspective: End of market or morality?

    • What are theoretical and practical examples of collaborative/distributive business in Islamic moral economy?
    • What is the importance of formal and informal institutional values for efficient collaborative business?
    • What are the models of collaborative/distributive business in the Muslim societies?
    • How can waqf, zakah funds and charity be considered within collaborative/distributive business?
    • How can collaborative business as a model affect the waste culture?
    • How to evaluate collaborative business in terms of competition and fairness?
    • How to evaluate collaborative business in terms of consumer culture and commodification?

(vi) Commodification, consumer culture, and collaborative business: Theory and practice from Islamic moral economy perspective.

    • How does Islamic moral economy differ from conventional system in terms of promoting commodification, fictitious products and consumer culture? In other words, what is the distrubtive and collaborative nature of Islamic moral economy?
    • What is the trend of commodification in Muslim vs. Western countries?
    • How will growing collaborative business practices affect commodification?

(vii) Towards sharing economy through Islamic finance

    • What are the risk sharing and profit-and-loss sharing practices in Islamic banks and financial institutions?
    • Why and how risk sharing and profit-and-loss sharing practices in Islamic banks and financial institutions are not happening as opposed to aspirational essentalisation?
    • What is the state of de-commodification and fictitious commodities practices in Islamic finance? And what is the role of new Islamic financial instruments in essentialising commodification and fictitious commoodities?
    • How sustainable development practices can be developed within Islamic moral economy and finance in responding and essentialising SDGs and ESGs?
    • What is the practices of Islamic banks and financial institutions for demand/material reduction?
    • How has Islamic finance contributed to the expansion of financialisation as opposed to debt-discouragement?

(viii) New institutional forms towards sharing economy in Islamic finance

    • How does Islamic social finance affect the expansion of sharing economy?
    • What is the role of waqf and zakah fund institutions in essentialising and expanding sharing economy?
    • How does Islamic micro-finance, Islamic crowd-funding and Islamic development funds contribute to sharing/collaborative and disruptive economy?
    • What is the nature of gift economy in contributing to sharing/collaborative and disruptive economy?
    • How can SMEs financing through Islamic social finance, Islamic social banks and funds, Islamic credit units and cooperatives, and other emerging practices and institutions contribute to sharing economy? And how such platforms can be structured and developed?
    • How the instruments and institutions/platforms of sharing economy essentialising collaborative and disruptive economy practices can be engineered?
    • What is the role of technology in developing such instruments and platforms in Islamic finance universe within Islamic moral economy paradigm?

(ix) Political economy and regulation for the development of sharing economy

    • Why has Islamic finance been constructed as commercial bank rather than essentialising sharing economy?
    • What are the political economy sources of Islamic finance’s failure in essentialising sharing economy?
    • Is financialisation an issue in Islamic finance practice? How and why such practices have been developed and what their impact on the trajectory of development of Islamic finance?
    • How regulative environment can help to develop sharing economy in the form of collaborative/distributive business?
    • What regulative developments can be considered to develop sustainable development and demand reduction within Islamic finance?

(x) Political and moral economy responses for the development of sharing economy within Islamic moral economy

    • How Islamic finance can be reverted to its original promise to generate disruptive and collaborative/sharing economy?
    • What actors and institutions can be essential in going back to the original promise of Islamic moral economy in generating a disruptive and collaborative/sharing economy beyond the current practices of Islamic finance?
    • What political economy turn is needed to shift to a different modes of production to essentialise sharing and distributive and disruptive and collaborative economy?
    • How social justice and distributive nature of Islamic moral economy can be articulated in institutional formation?

Abstract/Paper Submission

Please note that colleagues should send 1,000 words abstract by 18 January 2017, which should provide a short background, aims of the paper, the methodology and method used, and the findings (or expected findings).

The deadline for submitting proposals has been extended to 17 February 2017.

Acceptance notifications will be sent by 1 March 2017.

Paper submissions and session proposals must be made through our online submission system; for additional information on how to submit, please follow the link:
https://sase.org/events/conference-submission-and-award-guidelines/

If you have any queries, please do not hesitate to contact the corresponding organisers below:

Mehmet Asutay (Corresponding organizer)
Professor in Middle East and Islamic Political Economy and Finance
Director, Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance
Durham University Business School
Durham University, UK
Email: mehmet.asutay@durham.ac.uk

Necati Aydin
Associate Professor of Economics
College of Business, Alfaisal University
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Email: naydin@alfaisal.edu


International Conference on Islamic Finance, Islamic Economic Development and Sustainability

25-26 July 2016 in Durham

Conference Programme (pdf)

The conference provides a platform among academics, researchers and practitioners to share and synthesize their theoretical, empirical and field related knowledge in relation to the Islamic economic and sustainable development theory and practice as well as exploring the strategies and consequences of Islamic finance for economic and sustainable development.

The conference, thus, aims to contribute to the development of theory making in Islamic economic and sustainable development; as well as aiming to evaluate the current practice of Islamic banking and finance in terms of economic and sustainable development.

In doing so, the conference will provide a platform to discuss potential areas and strategies for further orienting Islamic banking and finance for sustainable development, beyond the current practice of financialisation so that the observed transactional success of Islamic finance can be coupled with transformational success as the Islamic moral economy assumes.

Call for papers

Papers in the following broader thematic areas are encouraged to be submitted:

  • Theoretical and conceptual studies, and models in Islamic economic and sustainable development;
  • Explorative studies in Islamic Political Economy and Islamic Moral Economy in essentialising developmentalism;
  • Theoretical studies and models in exploring Islamic finance in facilitating economic and sustainable development;
  • Theoretical and conceptual studies on the instruments and operations of Islamic finance for economic and sustainable development;
  • Empirical studies critically focusing on the performance of Islamic banking and finance in relation to economic development, sustainable development, and social impact;
  • Empirical studies on Islamic finance (including Islamic capital markets) and infrastructural development, and their sustainable development consequences;
  • Empirical studies on Islamic non-banking financing institutions (such as Islamic microfinance, Islamic social funds, and Islamic development funds) and Islamic social financing (zakah and infaq) and related institutions (zakahfunds, waqf and Islamic charities) and their economic and sustainable development consequences;
  • Critical conceptual studies on developmentalist implications of maqasid al-Shari’ah and the debate on maqasid al-Shari’ah’s conceptual and practical capacity to produce developmentalism; and evaluative studies on Islamic banking and finance in relation to maqasid performance;
  • Theoretical and empirical oriented convergence studies on SDG and ESG movements and their relations with Islamic economic and sustainable development; and empirical studies on SDGs and ESG performance of Islamic banking and finance;
  • Explorative studies on the role of civil society and politics in developing and furthering developmentalist initiatives within Islamic normative world and ethical principles.

Extended Abstract Submission and Submission Process:

Authors may submit an extended abstract of theoretical and empirical research papers with approximately 1,500 words to:

Professor Mehmet Asutay: mehmet.asutay@durham.ac.uk; and copying to Dr Shafiullah Jan:ceif@imsciences.edu.pk

The extended abstract submissions will undergo a rigorous process of review. All submissions will subject to a blind review. All authors of accepted abstracts will be notified through email indicating the submission of full papers.

Deadline for Extended Abstract Submission: 9 May 2016
Notification of Acceptance: 25 May 2016
Letter of Invitation for the Accepted Extended Abstracts: 1 June 2016

Author Guidelines:

The authors must adhere to the following guidelines for the submission of their work:

  • Please submit your extended abstract of approximately 1,500 words via email as ms-word file;
  • A cover page should indicate the title of the paper, the name(s) of the author(s), and their affiliation(s) and the corresponding author.
  • The main body of the document should provide the extended abstract.

Publication Opportunity:

We are in the process of developing publication opportunities in edited book volumes and special issues in a journal; after the acceptance of the extended abstracts, further information will be provided.

Conference Provisions:

  • Local hospitality (lunches and dinners) will be provided during the conference;
  • Accommodation based on bed-and-breakfast at Collingwood College (Durham University) will be provided for all the paper presenters free of charge for duration of the conference (three nights).

Venue:

Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance, Durham University Business School, Durham University, England

Conference Committee:

  • Mehmet Asutay, Durham University, UK
  • Ahmed El-Sayed, Durham University, UK
  • Zamir Iqbal, World Bank, Turkey
  • Zohra Jabeen, Institute of Management Sciences, Pakistan
  • Tim Jacoby, Manchester University, UK
  • Shafiullah Jan, Institute of Management Sciences, Pakistan
  • Beverly Metcalfe, Manchester University, UK
  • Karim Ullah, Institute of Management Sciences, Pakistan

Contacts for Further Information:

Professor Mehmet Asutay, Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Political Economy & Finance and Director, Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance
Durham University Business School,
Durham University, UK
Email: mehmet.asutay@durham.ac.uk

Dr Shafiullah Jan, Research Chair, Center for Excellence in Islamic Finance (CEIF)
Institute of Management Sciences (IM|Sciences),
Peshawar, Pakistan
Email: shafiullah.jan@imsciences.edu.pk

Organising Institutions

Centre for Excellence in Islamic Finance (CEIF) – Institute of Management Sciences, Pakistan

Institute of Management Sciences (IMSciences) provides management education based on cutting edge research and comprehensive training. Being number 5th Business School in the country, IMSciences broadens its educational focus in response to new trends in the developing field of management. This is demonstrated through newly established Centre for Excellence in Islamic Finance (CEIF) in collaboration with State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) through financial support of UK’s Department of International Development (DFID). The overall strategy of CEIF is designed on threefold orientations namely academia, research and industry efforts to boost-up Islamic finance and financial inclusion through it.

CEIF offers the following programmes: MBA Islamic Banking & Takaful and PhD in Islamic Business & Finance.

Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance (DCIEF), Durham University Business School, Durham University, England, UK

With its world-class reputation for being a research, education and training centre in Islamic economics, Islamic finance, banking and accounting as well as Islamic management for over twenty-five years, DCIEF aims to maintain its position as a leading provider of world-class research, education and training in Islamic economics and finance; and to provide a platform from which a vibrant research environment specializing in Islamic finance related research can be developed and sustained;

DCIEF offers the following programmes: MSc Islamic Finance; MSc Islamic Finance and Management; Ph.D by Research in Islamic Finance and Economics; Integrated PhD (1 year course work and 3 years PhD) in Islamic Finance and Economics; The Durham Islamic Finance Summer School (DIFSS).

DCIEF has established international collaborative research and training programmes, conferences and seminars with many international collaborators.


Call for Papers

Islam and the Construction of New Economic Moralities: Divergence, Convergence and Competing Futures

SASE Conference on ‘Moral Economies, Economic Moralities’, University of California-Berkeley

24-26 June 2016

We are organising an international mini-conference with the theme, “Islam and the Construction of New Economic Moralities: Divergence, Convergence and Competing Futures.” The conference will be held at the University of California-Berkeley 24-26 June 2016, as part of a larger SASE conference with the highly relevant theme, “Moral Economies, Economic Moralities.”

Selection of papers will be based on 1000 word extended abstracts, which are due 18 January 2016. Full papers are due 30 May 2016. Three best papers awards will be given, as well as a limited number of travel grants for graduate students.

Full details >>


Recent conferences and events

Poverty Alleviation and Islamic Economics & Finance: Current Issues and Future Prospects

21-22 May 2013 at Durham University, UK

It is widely acknowledged that poverty continues to be an essential problem prevailing in large parts of the world including in the industrialised countries, despite the manifold increases in the overall global income levels during the last century. In an attempt to construct a developmentalist discourse, Islamic economics and finance has essentialised poverty alleviation as one of the main thrust of its existence, as identified with its ‘human-centred economic development strategy’. As part of this discourse, Islamic banks and financial institutions were considered as the institutional response to developmentalism need in the Muslim world. Indeed, since the establishment of the first Islamic bank in the mid-1970s, the Islamic financial sector has developed with global financial assets reportedly rising up to over $1.2 trillion in 2012 and contributed to increasing welfare of Muslim societies.

However, despite the growth in assets, operations and institutionalization of Islamic banking and finance, poverty levels in numerous Muslim countries as well as in the global level remain high. Therefore, in responding to prevalence of poverty and failed impact of Islamic banking and finance, there is a need to re-consider poverty alleviation more seriously conceptually as well as practically within Islamic economics and finance discourse and practice, so that strategies towards poverty eradication can be developed as essentialised by Islamic economics. To that end, research related to poverty alleviation and Islamic finance strategies are pivotal.

This conference provided a platform to share current research with the objective of discussing issues and future prospects of Islamic economics and financial institutions, and strategies towards mitigating poverty.

International Conference on Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility: Ideals vs Realities

12-14 April 2012, Istanbul, Turkey

Organized jointly by IGIAD (Society for Economic Entrepreneurship and Business Ethics [Iktisadi Girisim ve Is Ahlaki Dernegi]), Istanbul, Turkey & Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance, Durham University, UK

This conference aims to contribute to the debate on aspirations and realities in relation to business ethics and corporate social responsibility by providing a forum for academics, researchers, scholars, managers, entrepreneurs and business executives to share their research and knowledge empirically or discursively in relation to the changing and expected dynamics of business ethics and CSR.

Further Information is available from the conference website

Understanding Islamic Securitization, Sukuk Structures and Documentation

23-25 April 2012, at DIFC Centre of Excellence, Dubai - UAE

Organized by Hawkamah, the Institute for Corporate Governance in Partnership with Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance, UK, and Dar Al-Sharia.

Hawkamah, the Institute for Corporate Governance has partnered with Dar Al Sharia Legal & Financial Consultancy LLC, and UK's Durham University, to offer a 3 day course in Islamic securitization and Sukuk structures. A half day Pre Workshop Seminar is also being held on "Principles of Islamic Finance and Islamic Financing Structures" is being held on April 22, 2012 for those who are new to Islamic Finance.

This course will benefit professionals working within the finance industry who seek to better understand the functional comparison between conventional and Islamic finance. The participants will benefit from a unique curriculum that teaches simultaneously the academic and practical elements of Islamic finance (focusing on securitization and Sukuks), including the role of corporate governance in Islamic finance, providing the participants an overall understanding of how Islamic finance operates.

Certificates will be awarded jointly in the name of Hawkamah, Dar Al Sharia and Durham University, UK.

Further information

Previous guest speakers and research seminars include:

International Conference on Islamic Finance, Islamic Economic Development and Sustainability

26-27 July 2016 in Durham

The conference provides a platform among academics, researchers and practitioners to share and synthesize their theoretical, empirical and field related knowledge in relation to the Islamic economic and sustainable development theory and practice as well as exploring the strategies and consequences of Islamic finance for economic and sustainable development.

The conference, thus, aims to contribute to the development of theory making in Islamic economic and sustainable development; as well as aiming to evaluate the current practice of Islamic banking and finance in terms of economic and sustainable development.

In doing so, the conference will provide a platform to discuss potential areas and strategies for further orienting Islamic banking and finance for sustainable development, beyond the current practice of financialisation so that the observed transactional success of Islamic finance can be coupled with transformational success as the Islamic moral economy assumes.

Call for papers

Papers in the following broader thematic areas are encouraged to be submitted:

  • Theoretical and conceptual studies, and models in Islamic economic and sustainable development;
  • Explorative studies in Islamic Political Economy and Islamic Moral Economy in essentialising developmentalism;
  • Theoretical studies and models in exploring Islamic finance in facilitating economic and sustainable development;
  • Theoretical and conceptual studies on the instruments and operations of Islamic finance for economic and sustainable development;
  • Empirical studies critically focusing on the performance of Islamic banking and finance in relation to economic development, sustainable development, and social impact;
  • Empirical studies on Islamic finance (including Islamic capital markets) and infrastructural development, and their sustainable development consequences;
  • Empirical studies on Islamic non-banking financing institutions (such as Islamic microfinance, Islamic social funds, and Islamic development funds) and Islamic social financing (zakah and infaq) and related institutions (zakahfunds, waqf and Islamic charities) and their economic and sustainable development consequences;
  • Critical conceptual studies on developmentalist implications of maqasid al-Shari’ah and the debate on maqasid al-Shari’ah’s conceptual and practical capacity to produce developmentalism; and evaluative studies on Islamic banking and finance in relation to maqasid performance;
  • Theoretical and empirical oriented convergence studies on SDG and ESG movements and their relations with Islamic economic and sustainable development; and empirical studies on SDGs and ESG performance of Islamic banking and finance;
  • Explorative studies on the role of civil society and politics in developing and furthering developmentalist initiatives within Islamic normative world and ethical principles.

Extended Abstract Submission and Submission Process:

Authors may submit an extended abstract of theoretical and empirical research papers with approximately 1,500 words to:

Professor Mehmet Asutay: mehmet.asutay@durham.ac.uk; and copying to Dr Shafiullah Jan:ceif@imsciences.edu.pk

The extended abstract submissions will undergo a rigorous process of review. All submissions will subject to a blind review. All authors of accepted abstracts will be notified through email indicating the submission of full papers.

Deadline for Extended Abstract Submission: 9 May 2016
Notification of Acceptance: 25 May 2016
Letter of Invitation for the Accepted Extended Abstracts: 1 June 2016

Author Guidelines:

The authors must adhere to the following guidelines for the submission of their work:

  • Please submit your extended abstract of approximately 1,500 words via email as ms-word file;
  • A cover page should indicate the title of the paper, the name(s) of the author(s), and their affiliation(s) and the corresponding author.
  • The main body of the document should provide the extended abstract.

Publication Opportunity:

We are in the process of developing publication opportunities in edited book volumes and special issues in a journal; after the acceptance of the extended abstracts, further information will be provided.

Conference Provisions:

  • Local hospitality (lunches and dinners) will be provided during the conference;
  • Accommodation based on bed-and-breakfast at Collingwood College (Durham University) will be provided for all the paper presenters free of charge for duration of the conference (three nights).

Venue:

Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance, Durham University Business School, Durham University, England

Conference Committee:

  • Mehmet Asutay, Durham University, UK
  • Ahmed El-Sayed, Durham University, UK
  • Zamir Iqbal, World Bank, Turkey
  • Zohra Jabeen, Institute of Management Sciences, Pakistan
  • Tim Jacoby, Manchester University, UK
  • Shafiullah Jan, Institute of Management Sciences, Pakistan
  • Beverly Metcalfe, Manchester University, UK
  • Karim Ullah, Institute of Management Sciences, Pakistan

Contacts for Further Information:

Professor Mehmet Asutay, Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Political Economy & Finance and Director, Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance
Durham University Business School,
Durham University, UK
Email: mehmet.asutay@durham.ac.uk

Dr Shafiullah Jan, Research Chair, Center for Excellence in Islamic Finance (CEIF)
Institute of Management Sciences (IM|Sciences),
Peshawar, Pakistan
Email: shafiullah.jan@imsciences.edu.pk

Organising Institutions

Centre for Excellence in Islamic Finance (CEIF) – Institute of Management Sciences, Pakistan

Institute of Management Sciences (IMSciences) provides management education based on cutting edge research and comprehensive training. Being number 5th Business School in the country, IMSciences broadens its educational focus in response to new trends in the developing field of management. This is demonstrated through newly established Centre for Excellence in Islamic Finance (CEIF) in collaboration with State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) through financial support of UK’s Department of International Development (DFID). The overall strategy of CEIF is designed on threefold orientations namely academia, research and industry efforts to boost-up Islamic finance and financial inclusion through it.

CEIF offers the following programmes: MBA Islamic Banking & Takaful and PhD in Islamic Business & Finance.

Durham Centre for Islamic Economics and Finance (DCIEF), Durham University Business School, Durham University, England, UK

With its world-class reputation for being a research, education and training centre in Islamic economics, Islamic finance, banking and accounting as well as Islamic management for over twenty-five years, DCIEF aims to maintain its position as a leading provider of world-class research, education and training in Islamic economics and finance; and to provide a platform from which a vibrant research environment specializing in Islamic finance related research can be developed and sustained;

DCIEF offers the following programmes: MSc Islamic Finance; MSc Islamic Finance and Management; Ph.D by Research in Islamic Finance and Economics; Integrated PhD (1 year course work and 3 years PhD) in Islamic Finance and Economics; The Durham Islamic Finance Summer School (DIFSS).

DCIEF has established international collaborative research and training programmes, conferences and seminars with many international collaborators.