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Durham University

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

Previous Events

List of months

Friday 3 November 2017

POSTPONED: The Apparelled Body: Materiality, Transformation and Performativity

9:00am to 4:00pm, Kenworthy Hall, St. Mary's College

Thursday 16 November 2017

Lumiere Installation 2017 'Know thyself': Converting Bodies and Souls:

5:00pm to 6:00pm, Seminar Room 1, History Department, Finola Finn and Dr Lauren Working

Building on from ideas explored in Finola Finn's Lumiere installation, 'Know thyself', two complementary papers will examine the role of the heart, as both organ and symbol, in seventeenth-century transatlantic encounters:

Finola Finn, Durham University

'A broken and believing heart is the kernell': Inwardness in 'Know thyself' and Transatlantic Encounters

Dr Lauren Working, TIDE Project, University of Liverpool

Eating Hearts: Cannibalism and Friendship in England and America

For further details, please see the attached flyer. If you are planning to attend, you may want to consider being on the Bailey before 4pm, as access to the peninsula will be closed to pedestrians without Lumiere tickets between 4 and 7:30pm. After the seminar, we are planning to walk as a group to the 'Know thyself' installation, at the Count's House. Please join us.

http://www.lumiere-festival.com/programme/durham/know-thyself/

http://www.tideproject.uk

Contact finola.finn@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 21 November 2017

IAS Molecules and Models - Seeing Structures

Kenworthy Hall, St. Mary's College, Professor Ludmilla Jordanova and other contributors

25 PLACES AVALIABLE. Register for your place here.

Organised by the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture(CVAC) as part of the Institute of Advanced Study Theme for 2017-18 Structure

Molecular models participate in attempts to understand the structure of matter; they are one of the most recognizable of scientific artifacts, featuring, for example, in Maggie Hambling’s celebrated portrait of Dorothy Hodgkin and in the much-reproduced photograph of Watson and Crick beside a model of DNA. There is now an extensive scholarly literature on models in general and on specific ones, such as DNA. The meeting will consider the specifically visual properties and impact of molecular models, for example, in advertising and popular culture.

Questions to be addressed include:

What roles have molecular models played in scientific practice?

How do they help us understand the nature of that practice?

What roles do they play in non-specialist representations of science?

How do they illuminate the theme of ‘structure’?

Might studies of molecular models and representations of them help us understand ‘visual thinking’?

For the full programme, click here.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


IAS Molecules and Models Public Lecture: The structure, the body, the archive: DNA and history

6:00pm to 7:30pm, Kenworthy Hall, St. Mary's College, Jerome de Groot

Jerome de Groot teaches at the University of Manchester. He is interested in popular history and the various ways that the past is accessed. He is the author of Consuming History (2008/ 2016) and Remaking History (2015).

How does knowledge of DNA change the way we think about the past? How does investigation of ancient DNA from archaeological sites shift our understanding of what it is to be ‘human’? How might our awareness of our genetic make-up change our sense of ourselves?

To address these questions this talk looks at various manifestations of DNA in historical investigation and thinks about how this relates to genealogy, humanness, public history, and the contemporary historical imagination. In particular I investigate how the duality of DNA in the historical imagination – material yet unseen evidence that lives within us – allows a dynamic connection with the past. How does the material ‘model’ of DNA impact upon the imagined ‘thing’? To do this I am going to think about what Jackie Pearson and others have termed the ‘genetic imaginary’. That is, popular understanding of the work of our DNA and, more particularly, how we might understand, represent, and visualise it. In particular I’m interested in how genetic science interacts with historical awareness. Therefore this talk investigates the intersection of genetics and popular narratives of the self and the past. How is this science represented and understood? How, particularly, is it visualised? What kinds of models are conceived of and circulated?

Many scholars have written about the new identity politics raised by genetic science. It is important to see these new identities within temporality. DNA brings genetics into a particularly historicised knowability. What was remote is now intimate; what was once ‘science’ is now ‘life’. Our genetic make up allows an enormous historical perspective to open up. The interplay between the imagined and the modelled and the mathematical is immensely rich and complicated. How is DNA conceptualised and rendered? How is it imagined as both past and current, veering between something reified as ancient and at the same time something almost excessively modern? The ‘narrative’ that is constructed depends on a diversity of analysis, probability, and modelling. The results are presented in a variety of formats and interpreted. The evidence is clear – it is us – but it is also unreadable and unknowable. The question of our individual relation to ‘humanness’ is provoked by DNA investigation. How does kinship, race, ethnicity, identity, function here? How does this change our understanding of ourselves in time?

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Wednesday 22 November 2017

IAS Molecules and Models - Seeing Structures

Kenworthy Hall, St. Mary's College, Professor Ludmilla Jordanova and other contributors

25 PLACES AVALIABLE. Register for your place here.

Organised by the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture(CVAC) as part of the Institute of Advanced Study Theme for 2017-18 Structure

Molecular models participate in attempts to understand the structure of matter; they are one of the most recognizable of scientific artifacts, featuring, for example, in Maggie Hambling’s celebrated portrait of Dorothy Hodgkin and in the much-reproduced photograph of Watson and Crick beside a model of DNA. There is now an extensive scholarly literature on models in general and on specific ones, such as DNA. The meeting will consider the specifically visual properties and impact of molecular models, for example, in advertising and popular culture.

Questions to be addressed include:

What roles have molecular models played in scientific practice?

How do they help us understand the nature of that practice?

What roles do they play in non-specialist representations of science?

How do they illuminate the theme of ‘structure’?

Might studies of molecular models and representations of them help us understand ‘visual thinking’?

For the full programme, click here.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 24 November 2017

Visual methods in participatory research: ethical and practical issues in working with refugees and other groups

11:00am to 4:00pm, St. Marys College, Durham

The Centre for Social Justice and Community Action and CVAC are delighted to co-sponsor this workshop.

The event is free, but BOOKING IS ESSENTIAL. Lunch included. Please book early as places are limited to 50. Please book using this link.

This workshop aims to explore some of the ethical and practical issues in participatory research using visual methods, particularly with refugees and other groups whose voices are seldom heard. It is a joint venture between the Centre for Social Justice and Community Action and the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture, Durham University. Our first keynote speaker is Dr Caroline Lenette (University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia), who is particularly concerned with the ethics of using visual methods to document refugee and asylum seeker narratives through community-based participatory research and practice. We will then hear about the practical and ethical navigation of an arts/research partnership in a project on belonging among resettled Syrian young people in Gateshead, UK with Caitlin Nunn (Durham University), Vikas Kumar (Gem Arts), a representative from the Gateshead resettlement team, Isabel Finch (Independent artist) and representatives from Syrian youth participants. In the afternoon there will be a choice of workshops, offering the opportunity to hear about, try and evaluate a variety of participatory visual methods and approaches (e.g. photography, film, performance). For more information please contact Sarah Banks.

Contact socialjustice@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.