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Durham University

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

Previous Events

List of months

Tuesday 7 June 2016

CVAC AGM

12:30pm to 5:00pm, Kenworthy Hall, St. Mary's College

Please click here to view the AGM schedule.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Bowes Lecture Series: Professor Ludmilla Jordanova, ‘Women, Flowers, Portraits’

6:00pm to 7:00pm, The Bowes Museum , Professer Ludmilla Jordanova

The association between women and flowers has been ubiquitous for a long time, and it remains common today. I will examine this trope in portraits of women and explore the imagery associated with femininity, using examples from the seventeenth-century onwards. This talk is designed to tie in with 'The English Rose' exhibition at the Bowes Museum.

Free to Durham University Students. Discount of 50% for friends of The Bowes Museum, Art fund members, NADFAS members, Durham University staff.


Tuesday 21 June 2016

Visual Culture Visual Anthropology

9:30am to 6:00pm, Joachim Room, College of St. Hild and St. Bede

In recent years there has been an explosion of interest in questions of visual culture and visual anthropology. Colleagues in departments around the University are working on visual texts and/or material artefacts and unlocking crucial information about human experiences and the cultures and civilizations that produced them. This work, which assumes many and manifold forms, is fundamentally interdisciplinary in character, and has implications for researchers working in a range of fields. It is all too often the case, however, that colleagues in one part of the University remain unaware of some of the exciting, innovative, and potentially complementary developments taking place elsewhere.

Please click here to see the programme. To book a place, please email cvac@durham.ac.uk


Wednesday 22 June 2016

Urban Visual Cultures Workshop

9:00am to 5:00pm, St. Chads College, Williams Library

This conference brings together an interdisciplinary and international range of speakers with a particular interest in the late medieval and early modern city as a site of the visual. The study of the forms and functions of the visual—of signs, symbols, bodies, art and architecture in their relation to ritual, space, politics and identities—has demonstrated that the visual was not only a reflection of the norms and structures of medieval and early modern society, but a means of discursive communication that was constitutive of social order. This conference approaches the city as a quasi-public stage for the visual display and communication of social groups and urban institutions, in order to illustrate the ways in which visual culture was involved in maintaining and negotiating social order in the city. As visual display in the city also became the subject of meta-discourses on the visual itself, this conference also approaches questions of how contemporaries saw and interpreted visual elements in the city, and how these perceptions interacted with the ‘reality’ of lived experience.

The full programme is avaliable here.

To register for this event, please click here.


"The Rise of the Visual in the Twelfth Century" with Professor Torsten Hiltmann

6:30pm to 8:00pm, Hogan Lovells, Palatine Centre, Durham University, Professor Torsten Hiltmann

When looking at current research on visual culture and what is called visual history, one may easily get the impression that it was only with the invention of printed mass media and photomechanical reproduction that we entered an age of the visual. Yet has the visual not always been an important part of communication? Or has there at least been an earlier—medieval—change in the cultural and social attitude towards the visual that laid the foundation of the visual culture we encounter in the modern period?

This lecture will address this question from the perspective of medieval and early modern studies, and take in to account materiality, reproducibility, and the visual beyond images. It will this examine the role of the visual before the appearance of the modern visual culture, and suggest what the study of visual communication as a research approach in medieval and early modern history may look like.

All are welcome, no need to book.

Contact cva@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Thursday 23 June 2016

Urban Visual Cultures Workshop

9:00am to 5:00pm, St. Chads College, Williams Library

This conference brings together an interdisciplinary and international range of speakers with a particular interest in the late medieval and early modern city as a site of the visual. The study of the forms and functions of the visual—of signs, symbols, bodies, art and architecture in their relation to ritual, space, politics and identities—has demonstrated that the visual was not only a reflection of the norms and structures of medieval and early modern society, but a means of discursive communication that was constitutive of social order. This conference approaches the city as a quasi-public stage for the visual display and communication of social groups and urban institutions, in order to illustrate the ways in which visual culture was involved in maintaining and negotiating social order in the city. As visual display in the city also became the subject of meta-discourses on the visual itself, this conference also approaches questions of how contemporaries saw and interpreted visual elements in the city, and how these perceptions interacted with the ‘reality’ of lived experience.

The full programme is avaliable here.

To register for this event, please click here.