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Durham University

Centre for Visual Arts and Culture

CVAC Events Listing

List of months

Tuesday 4 June 2019

Arts of Habit, Habits of Art: Slow Time, Ecologies, Vision

10:00am to 4:00pm, Lindisfarne Centre, St Aidan's College

A joint research conversation between the Centre for Visual Arts & Culture and the Centre for Cultural Ecologies.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Treasures of Palace Green Library

5:45pm to 6:45pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

The Special Collections housed in Palace Green Library, Durham University, contain many priceless and fascinating manuscripts, books, prints, photographs and much more. Members of staff who know the collections intimately discuss some of the most significant and interesting items that they care for.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 10 June 2019

CVAC Advisory Board

9:00am to 11:00am, Joachim Room, Hild Bede

CVAC AGM

11:00am to 6:30pm, Joachim Room, College of St Hild and St Bede

To celebrate another year of actvities at the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture, please join us for a day of presentations and discussion on topics including photography, exhibitions and architecture.


Tuesday 11 June 2019

Exploring Photographic Media

Palace Green Library

On 11th June Professor Hubert Locher, from the University of Marburg and a leading historian of photography, will be visiting Durham in his capacity as a member of CVAC’s advisory board. Following the AGM on 10th June, there will be workshop with Professor Locher on the following day at which members of CVAC are invited to present their work in progress on photographic media.


Monday 17 June 2019

Illiberal Democracies? Hungary and Romania in Interwar Europe

5:45pm to 6:45pm, Gala Theatre, Durham, James Koranyi

Since the emergence of self-styled illiberal democracies in east-central Europe, most prominently in Hungary and Poland, observers have noted that east-central European societies simply have no history of democracy to boast of and therefore revert to type. This talk questions that view and discovers another story.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Thursday 20 June 2019

Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

Contact edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 21 June 2019

Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

Contact edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Classical Encounters: Receptions of antiquity in the long nineteenth century

12:00pm to 3:45pm, Pemberton Rooms (PG21) Palace Green

‘Classical Encounters: Receptions of antiquity in the long nineteenth century’ will bring together scholars from a broad range of disciplines to explore encounters with the ancient world in nineteenth-century visual, material, literary and political culture and the implications of these encounters on discourses such as nationhood, colonialism, race, religion, gender, sexuality and death. A roundtable will offer interdisciplinary interventions on classical receptions to discuss the future(s) of reception studies.

Contact seren.j.nolan@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Saturday 22 June 2019

Classical Encounters: Receptions of antiquity in the long nineteenth century

12:00pm to 3:45pm, Pemberton Rooms (PG21) Palace Green

‘Classical Encounters: Receptions of antiquity in the long nineteenth century’ will bring together scholars from a broad range of disciplines to explore encounters with the ancient world in nineteenth-century visual, material, literary and political culture and the implications of these encounters on discourses such as nationhood, colonialism, race, religion, gender, sexuality and death. A roundtable will offer interdisciplinary interventions on classical receptions to discuss the future(s) of reception studies.

Contact seren.j.nolan@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 25 June 2019

CANCELLED The Story of the Sacred Journey (The Legend of the City)

Gala Theatre, Durham, Dr Brendan Quayle

Due to unforeseen circumstances, we regret to inform you that this event has been cancelled. Commissioned by Durham City Council, and originally screened in large scale 70mm format, Sacred Journey was produced by local film maker and writer Dr Brendan Quayle. Telling the story of St. Cuthbert and the birth of Durham, the film powerfully dramatises the legendary origins one of the country’s most fascinating cities. Here we present a screening of the film (22 mins) followed by Brendan discussing the origin of the film and its creation.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


List of months

Tuesday 4 June 2019

Arts of Habit, Habits of Art: Slow Time, Ecologies, Vision

10:00am to 4:00pm, Lindisfarne Centre, St Aidan's College

A joint research conversation between the Centre for Visual Arts & Culture and the Centre for Cultural Ecologies.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Treasures of Palace Green Library

5:45pm to 6:45pm, Gala Theatre, Durham

The Special Collections housed in Palace Green Library, Durham University, contain many priceless and fascinating manuscripts, books, prints, photographs and much more. Members of staff who know the collections intimately discuss some of the most significant and interesting items that they care for.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Monday 10 June 2019

CVAC Advisory Board

9:00am to 11:00am, Joachim Room, Hild Bede

CVAC AGM

11:00am to 6:30pm, Joachim Room, College of St Hild and St Bede

To celebrate another year of actvities at the Centre for Visual Arts and Culture, please join us for a day of presentations and discussion on topics including photography, exhibitions and architecture.


Tuesday 11 June 2019

Exploring Photographic Media

Palace Green Library

On 11th June Professor Hubert Locher, from the University of Marburg and a leading historian of photography, will be visiting Durham in his capacity as a member of CVAC’s advisory board. Following the AGM on 10th June, there will be workshop with Professor Locher on the following day at which members of CVAC are invited to present their work in progress on photographic media.


Monday 17 June 2019

Illiberal Democracies? Hungary and Romania in Interwar Europe

5:45pm to 6:45pm, Gala Theatre, Durham, James Koranyi

Since the emergence of self-styled illiberal democracies in east-central Europe, most prominently in Hungary and Poland, observers have noted that east-central European societies simply have no history of democracy to boast of and therefore revert to type. This talk questions that view and discovers another story.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Thursday 20 June 2019

Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

Contact edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Friday 21 June 2019

Canons and Repertoires: Constructing the Visual Arts in the Hispanic World

The visual arts in Spain have long been haunted by the spectres of six giants: El Greco, Ribera, Velázquez, Murillo, Goya and Picasso. Still today, these canonical figures tower over all others and continue to shape the story of Spanish art, which has been traditionally told in monographic form. Although the strength of the Spanish canon has informed different disciplines (literature, aesthetics, performing arts), given the recent ‘material turn’, the prosopographical dimension of the visual arts in Spain poses a disciplinary challenge. Similarly, following the ‘global turn’, the visual arts of Iberia pose a geographical challenge, intersecting with the Mediterranean, Arabic, Latin American, British and continental European worlds. The notions of ‘Spain’ and ‘Spanish art’, therefore, are necessarily nebulous and problematic, raising a host of questions: To what extent does Spanish art exist before the establishment of Spain as a nation state? To what extent is the art of the Habsburg and Bourbon empires a Spanish art outside Spain? What is the role of Spain in the wider canon of European art? Who has exploited the visual arts of the Hispanic world, geographically, politically and intellectually? These questions ultimately point to a tension between canons and repertoires; between centres and peripheries; and between consolidating the ‘core’ and expanding the ‘remit’ of the so-called Spanish school.

Contact edward.a.payne@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Classical Encounters: Receptions of antiquity in the long nineteenth century

12:00pm to 3:45pm, Pemberton Rooms (PG21) Palace Green

‘Classical Encounters: Receptions of antiquity in the long nineteenth century’ will bring together scholars from a broad range of disciplines to explore encounters with the ancient world in nineteenth-century visual, material, literary and political culture and the implications of these encounters on discourses such as nationhood, colonialism, race, religion, gender, sexuality and death. A roundtable will offer interdisciplinary interventions on classical receptions to discuss the future(s) of reception studies.

Contact seren.j.nolan@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Saturday 22 June 2019

Classical Encounters: Receptions of antiquity in the long nineteenth century

12:00pm to 3:45pm, Pemberton Rooms (PG21) Palace Green

‘Classical Encounters: Receptions of antiquity in the long nineteenth century’ will bring together scholars from a broad range of disciplines to explore encounters with the ancient world in nineteenth-century visual, material, literary and political culture and the implications of these encounters on discourses such as nationhood, colonialism, race, religion, gender, sexuality and death. A roundtable will offer interdisciplinary interventions on classical receptions to discuss the future(s) of reception studies.

Contact seren.j.nolan@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Tuesday 25 June 2019

CANCELLED The Story of the Sacred Journey (The Legend of the City)

Gala Theatre, Durham, Dr Brendan Quayle

Due to unforeseen circumstances, we regret to inform you that this event has been cancelled. Commissioned by Durham City Council, and originally screened in large scale 70mm format, Sacred Journey was produced by local film maker and writer Dr Brendan Quayle. Telling the story of St. Cuthbert and the birth of Durham, the film powerfully dramatises the legendary origins one of the country’s most fascinating cities. Here we present a screening of the film (22 mins) followed by Brendan discussing the origin of the film and its creation.

Contact cvac@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.