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Durham University

Courses

LL36 Anthropology and Sociology BA Undergraduate  2021

Essentials

For the latest information on our plans for teaching in academic year 2020/21 in light of Covid-19, please see www.durham.ac.uk/coronavirus

UCAS code LL36
Degree BA
Mode of study Full Time
Duration 3 years
Location Durham City
Typical Offers A Level
AAB
BTEC
DDD
International Baccalaureate
36
Please also check Requirements and Admissions.
Alternative qualifications
Contextual Offers You may be eligible for an offer which is one or two grades lower than our standard entry requirements. Find out more.
More information Still have questions?
Department(s) Website www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology
www.durham.ac.uk/sociology

Course Summary

Description

There are several areas of overlap between Anthropology and Sociology, making them particularly suitable for combination in a joint honours degree. The BA Anthropology and Sociology course combines modules from the BA Anthropology and BA Sociology providing a comprehensive understanding of humans as social and cultural beings. 

Year 1 

In the first year, you take a selection of modules from across the two departments (i.e. Anthropology and Sociology):

Compulsory theory modules: 

  • People and Cultures 

and/or 

  • Classical Sociological Theory. 

Compulsory research modules: 

  • Doing Anthropological Research 

or 

  • Social Research Methods. 

Optional modules: 

  • Being Human
  • Critical Scholarship in the Social Sciences
  • Health, Illness and Society
  • Human Evolution and Diversity
  • Introduction to Criminological Theory
  • Societies in Transition (double module) 

Year 2

Students currently select a mixture of modules from both Anthropology and Sociology, either split evenly or weighted towards one or the other disciplines, including compulsory research training in either Anthropology or Sociology as preparation for the final year dissertation module.

Compulsory research modules:

  • Research Methods in Action (double module)

or

  • Anthropological Field Course
  • Research Project Design.

Optional modules currently available in Sociology: 

  • Communities and Social Justice
  • Contemporary Criminological Theory
  • Crime, Power and Social Inequalities
  • Police and Policing
  • Self, Identity and Society
  • Sociology of Education and Social Inequalities
  • Sociology of Health and Medicine
  • Violence and Abuse in Society.

 Optional modules currently available in Anthropology: 

  • Community Placement
  • Crime, Justice and the Sex Industry
  • Cyberculture and Cybercrime
  • Inside Out: Issues in Criminal Justice
  • Social Policy
  • Sociology of Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation
  • Sociology of Work and Professions
  • Feminist Anti-Violence Activism (short module)
  • Justice, Violence and Abuse (short module)
  • Youth in Crisis (short module)
  • Sociology of Mental Health (short module)
  • Sociology of Reproduction and Parenthood (short module).

Year 3 

You take a 40-credit Dissertation in Anthropology or a 40-credit Dissertation in Sociology in view of previous training in social research.  Additionally, students currently take up to 60 credits of modules in each Department.

Optional modules in Anthropology: 

  • Specialised Aspects in Evolutionary Anthropology 
  • Specialised Aspects in Health and Medical Anthropology 
  • Specialised Aspects in Social Anthropology.

Example modules in Sociology: 

  • Community Placement
  • Cybercrime: Crime in the Information Age
  • Drugs, Crime and Society
  • Issues in Criminal Justice
  • Social Policy
  • Sociology of Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation
  • Sociology of Health and Medicine
  • Sociology of Work and Professions
  • Young People, Crime and Justice.

 

Study Abroad

Anthropology

Study abroad or placement activities undertaken as part of a degree are not only enjoyable but can give a significant edge when it comes to employability. ERASMUS exchanges are possible on our degrees, and we currently have links with the University of West Bohemia (Czech Republic), the University of Iceland, the University of Ljubljana (Slovenia) and the University of Malta, with new opportunities being added every year. We also run a third-year Field Course module, involving fieldwork at our South African field site.

Sociology and Criminology

We are part of the ERASMUS programme which encourages students to study for part of their course in a university of another EU country.

We currently have links with the universities of Helsinki in Finland and Duisburg-Essen in Germany. Students can also apply to the university-wide international exchange programme with universities in North America, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

Placement Year

You may be able to take a work placement. Find out more.

Course Learning and Teaching

As a student on the BA (Hons) Anthropology and Sociology degree, your learning will be supported by formal teaching sessions, such as lectures and smaller-group teaching in seminars and practical classes. You will shift from being a consumer of knowledge in the classroom to a generator of knowledge, ready for professional or postgraduate life. To help develop this independence, you will spend part of your time engaged in self-directed study, which will include reading, project work and preparation for classes. In your third year, you will undertake a dissertation on a sociological or anthropological topic of your choice, preferably one that overlaps the two subjects, giving you the chance to engage in a major piece of independent work.

Assessment on the BA (Hons) Anthropology and Sociology degree varies by module, but may include written examinations, coursework in the form of essays or research projects, and presentations. 

You will be given an academic advisor when you start your degree, and will normally keep the same advisor for the duration of your studies. Where possible, you will be given an academic advisor who has an interest or background in both sociology and anthropology. Academic advisors are there to support your academic work by providing advice about such things as study skills, module choices, dissertation topics, and applications for further study or employment. As well as discussing your academic work with your nominated advisor, you are encouraged to make use of the Feedback and Consultation hours provided by academic staff during term-time. These Feedback and Consultation hours give you the opportunity to discuss your work with module tutors, for example to seek clarification on complex ideas, get suggestions for additional readings, and receive further feedback on assessments.

As a student in the Sociology and Anthropology Departments, you will be welcomed into the wider departmental communities, for example being able to attend an extensive programme of research-focused seminars in both departments, where academic staff, postgraduate students and visiting scholars present their cutting-edge research, which may provide inspiration for your dissertation topic and even future study or employment. 

Admissions Process

Subject requirements, level and grade

A level offer – AAB

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma/OCR Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma – DDD

IB Diploma score – 36 with 665 in higher level subjects

In addition to satisfying the University’s general entry requirements, please note:

  • We welcome applications from those with other qualifications equivalent to our standard entry requirements and from mature students with non-standard qualifications or who may have had a break in their study. 
  • If you do not satisfy our general entry requirements, the Foundation Programme offers multidisciplinary degrees to prepare you for a range of specified degree courses.
  • We are pleased to consider applications for deferred entry.

Science A levels

Applicants taking Science A levels that include a practical component will be required to take and pass this as a condition of entry. This applies only to applicants sitting A levels with an English examination board.

English Language requirements

Please check requirements for your subject and level of study.

How to apply

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/apply

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/country.information/

Fees and Funding

The tuition fees for 2021/22 academic year have not yet been finalised, they will be displayed here once approved.

The tuition fees shown for home and EU students are for one complete academic year of full time study and are set according to the academic year of entry. Fees for subsequent years of your course may rise in line with an inflationary uplift as determined by the government.

The tuition fees shown for overseas students are for one complete academic year of full time study, are set according to the academic year of entry, and remain the same throughout the duration of the programme for that cohort (unless otherwise stated).

Please also check costs for colleges and accommodation.

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/finance 

Career Opportunities

Sociology and Criminology

Further details on career opportunities can be found here: https://www.durham.ac.uk/study/ug/employability

Open days and visits

Pre-application open day

Pre-application open days are the best way to discover all you need to know about Durham University. With representatives from all relevant academic and support service departments, and opportunities to explore college options, the open days provide our prospective undergraduates with the full experience of Durham University.

Please see the following page for further details and information on how to book a place: www.durham.ac.uk/opendays

Discover Durham Tours

Discover Durham tours offer a brief introduction to the University. The tour begins at one of our undergraduate colleges, where you will receive an introductory talk from a member of college staff, followed by a tour of the college by current students.

www.durham.ac.uk/undergraduate/live/visit/discoverdurham

Overseas Visit Schedule

www.durham.ac.uk/international/office/meetus

Department Information

Anthropology

Overview

Have you ever really thought about what it means to be human? If you have and you want to learn more, then anthropology could be for you.

Anthropology is the study of all aspects of humanity, from our evolutionary origins to our extraordinary social and cultural diversity. At Durham, we pride ourselves on the breadth of our research, learning and teaching, encompassing all aspects of anthropology, and influencing the wider world through research that has global significance.

Rankings

  • Top 50 in the QS World University Subject Rankings 2020
  • Top 10 in The Complete University Guide 2020.

Staff

For a current list of staff, please see the Anthropology Department web pages.

Facilities

The Department offers excellent facilities including superb collections of primate/human skeletal material and fossil hominid casts, an impressive collection of ethnographic art and material culture items, and an expanding collection of online films and video content. You will benefit from modern, purpose-built facilities, including comprehensively equipped teaching laboratories and use of lecture theatres and classrooms with excellent audio-visual equipment. We have a range of research labs (Sleep Lab, Hormone Lab, Physical Activity Lab, Bioinformatics Lab, Paleoanthropology Lab) and other facilities such as the Material Culture Collection that can be used by students for undergraduate and MAnth Dissertation research and training.

Website
www.durham.ac.uk/anthropology

Sociology and Criminology

Overview

Criminology

Explore crime, deviance and criminal justice as social issues.

Criminology is concerned with understanding crime, deviance and criminal justice. Criminologists ask, for example, why it is that some people are more likely to be victims or perpetrators of crime than others; how crime can be effectively controlled and prevented; and even how we come to define particular activities as “criminal” or not in the first place.

  • 4th in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2020.

Sociology

Develop a sophisticated understanding of societies and social issues. In broad terms, sociology seeks to understand the relationship between individual people and the wider cultural and institutional contexts within which they live. In doing so, it strives not only to make sense of social and cultural systems but also bring about transformative social change, drawing upon the systematic study of social issues to challenge inequalities and to inform the development of effective, evidence-based policy and practice.

  • World Top 100 in the QS World University Subject Rankings for Social Policy and Administration 2020.

Staff

For a current list of staff, please see the Department of Sociology web pages.

Facilities

The library’s resources for the study of criminology are among the best in northern Britain, and college libraries also hold copies of some of the main textbooks. We make extensive use of duo (Durham’s online teaching resource), and undergraduates can enjoy the use of the resources room within the Department, which has additional published material and networked computer access.

Website
www.durham.ac.uk/sociology