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Durham University

Durham Arctic Research Centre for Training and Interdisciplinary Collaboration (DurhamARCTIC)

Cohort 2019

Eric Boyd

Primary Supervisor: Professor Simone Abram (Anthropology)
Secondary Supervisor: Professor Gavin Bridge (Geography)

Romain Chuffart

Primary Supervisor: Dr Anashri Pillay (Durham Law School)
Secondary Supervisors: Dr Henry Jones (Durham Law School), Professor Philip Steinberg (Geography)

Christian Drury

Primary Supervisor: Dr Eleanor Barraclough (History)
Secondary Supervisors: Dr Abbie Garrington (English), Dr James Koranyi (History)

Greta Ferloni

Primary Supervisor: Professor Philip Steinberg (Human Geography)
Secondary Supervisors: Dr Jeremy Schmidt (Human Geography), Professor Chris Stokes (Physical Geography)

Katy Ivison

Primary Supervisor: Dr Wayne Dawson (Biosciences)
Secondary Supervisors: Dr Lisa Baldini (Geography), Dr James Speed (Department of Natural History, NTNU)

David Jarrett

Primary Supervisor: Professor Stephen Willis (Biosciences)
Secondary Supervisors: Dr Sally Street (Anthropology), Dr Aleksi Lehikoinen (LUOMUS, Finnish Museum of Natural History)


Eric Boyd

Eric holds an undergraduate degree in environmental science from the University of Dundee, and a Masters in anthropology, environment and development from University College London (UCL). After finishing his Masters, Eric worked as a co-editor for the Centre for the Anthropology of Sustainability (CAoS) research group at UCL.

Bringing together his interdisciplinary past within the DurhamArctic programme, his research will examine the cultural enframing of extractive resources as they force the demolition and redevelopment of the town of Kiruna in Swedish Lappland. Drawing on the synthesis of political and social ecologies deployed by the study of resource materialities, Eric’s research focuses primarily on the multiple temporal and agential relations emergent upon the human/resource frontier. During the course of this first year with DurhamArctic, Eric’s research has developed a conceptual space that incorporates hauntology, solastalgia and the dissolution of the material/immaterial binary to interrogate the redevelopment of Kiruna, Sweden.

As of January 2020, Eric has held a Visiting Research position at Gothenburg University’s School of Global Studies (SGS), where he is currently undertaking his placement.

--- Click here to see Eric Boyd's Placement Completion Report ---


Romain Chuffart

Romain is a PhD student at Durham Law School. His thesis focuses on the interaction between Indigenous rights and international environmental law. As part of his doctoral research, Romain focuses on environmental impact assessments in the Arctic. Romain holds a master’s degree in Polar Law from the University of Akureyri (Iceland), and he is interested in everything polar-related. In addition to his DurhamARCTIC project, Romain has published several articles in Arctic-specific journals on Arctic governance and Indigenous rights, and he recently co-guest edited a special issue of Polar Record (Cambridge University Press) on "International Law for Sustainability in Arctic Resource Development".


Christian Drury

Christian’s current research looks at British exploration, travel and tourism in the Arctic in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, particularly representations of modernity and landscape. His work focuses on how the Arctic was imagined as an empty space in European travel writing, as well as relationships between travellers and indigenous peoples in the Arctic. By taking an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on both historical and literary sources, Christian’s research considers the significance of enduring imaginative geographies of the Arctic. Through a close reading of a range of texts, he hopes to show how understanding historical colonial relationships in the region illuminates contemporary postcolonial issues.

Before joining the DurhamARCTIC PhD programme, Christian studied for a BA in History at the University of York, followed by an MA in History at University College London (SSEES). His previous research also looked at histories of travel and exploration, particularly mountaineering.


Greta Ferloni

Arctic sea ice is melting, and shipping traffic is increasing, raising challenges not just for risk mitigation and the management of marine traffic, but also for how we understand mobility in icy waters. My research examines sea ice mobilities in the Arctic waters of the Bering Sea by taking three perspectives that engage with (i) the mobility of space, (ii) the mobility of human and non-human entities in space, and (iii) mobility as experienced by those around mobile spaces from positions of relative stability.

Mobility research is at the heart of understanding how individual practices, specific knowledge, and the spatial practices of everyday life are embedded within broader mobilities of people, surfaces, volumes, power relations, geopolitics and culture. My research examines understandings of oceans as spaces interwoven with human agency in everyday life and engages with the changing materiality of oceans as dynamic and interactive volumes of water and ice. It thereby offers a new perspective on the intricate texture of mobility of, in and around the icy waters of the Bering Sea, revealing the ways in which different subjects, perspectives and ways of knowing intersect in complex ways to give insight into the entanglement of perception, cognition, movement and stasis that constitutes mobility.

Prior to starting my PhD, I studied Geography at Durham, followed by a two-year MSc in Geographical Information Management and Applications at the University of Utrecht (Netherlands). I have also worked for two years as a GIS consultant in Milan.


Katy Ivison

I graduated from the University of Birmingham with an MSci in Biological Sciences, specialising in ecology and climate change. For my 4th year project I researched the impact of elevated CO2 levels on invertebrate abundance at the new Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) facility in Staffordshire with the Birmingham Institute of Forest Research (BIFoR).

My PhD will focus on the effect of climate change and natural enemies on the risk of non-native plant invasion in Arctic Norway. Strong warming effects taking place throughout the Arctic may mean that non-native plants are more likely to establish themselves in vulnerable Arctic habitats. I will assess this likelihood through modelling and field experiments, and will look into the herbivory and pathogen infection rates on both native and non-native plants to observe how these may change under warming temperatures.


David Jarrett

In a rapidly warming Arctic, the abundance and distribution of many plant and animal species will undergo dramatic change. My research will investigate how this will affect communities living in the Arctic region. Before starting this program I worked in Scotland for the British Trust for Ornithology. I also studied Ecological Economics (MSc) at the University of Edinburgh.