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Durham University

Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (IMEMS)

Staff and Governance

To contact the IMEMS administrative office please use the following details:

E: admin.imems@durham.ac.uk

T: 0191 334 2974

Core Staff

The day-to-day running of IMEMS is the responsibility of the Core Executive Committee, comprising the Director and Associate Directors and the Administrator. 

Publication details

Gasper, G. (2004). ‘A doctor in the house’? The context for Anselm of Canterbury’s interest in medicine with reference to a probable case of malaria. Journal of Medieval History 30(3): 245-261.

Author(s) from Durham

Abstract

This paper discusses the nature of Anselm of Canterbury’s interest in medicine, an interest that has been noticed in passing before but never properly explored. The evidence comes mainly from the 1070s and 1080s when he was prior of the abbey of Bec in Normandy. His interest consistently arose from the duties and responsibilities of community life. It is in part a textual interest revealed by requests for medical books from Canterbury. It is also related to a dynamic web of monastic relations between Canterbury and Bec bound together by friendship. Anselm’s letters reveal a deep concern for the physical well-being of members of his community and his practical medical care is noted. A letter detailing symptoms of two monks sent to him from Canterbury exemplifies this. One of the cases is highly suggestive of malaria. This not only demonstrates the clarity of Anselm’s observations, but also is significant evidence in its own right for the history of malaria in Britain between the Anglo-Saxon period and the fourteenth century. Anselm’s interest in medicine lies on the cusp between theological thought and practical action. It also offers wider perspectives on the nature of monastic medical care and the theme of friendship in the eleventh and twelfth centuries.


Full Executive Committee

Our Full Executive Committee is made up of the Core Executive Committee, listed above, plus a number of executive members including:


International Advisory Board

We are extremely fortunate to have be able to call on the help and guidance of colleagues from around the world who help to shape and guide our direction, strategy and international reach. Our current Advisory Board members are: