OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.
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Channel: theghana-italynews

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    array(11) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(98) "Synopsis of Laundry Show, Boss Gisel Competes Fiercely Builds Laundry Business : Okezone Celebrity"
      ["link"]=>
      string(148) "https://theghana-italynews.com/celebrity/2021/08/28/synopsis-of-laundry-show-boss-gisel-competes-fiercely-builds-laundry-business-okezone-celebrity/"
      ["dc"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["creator"]=>
        string(16) "Sandy Richardson"
      }
      ["pubdate"]=>
      string(31) "Sat, 28 Aug 2021 05:50:20 +0000"
      ["category"]=>
      string(83) "CelebrityBossBuildsBusinesscelebrityCompetesFiercelyGiselLaundryOkezoneShowSynopsis"
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      ["description"]=>
      string(98) "SINOPSIS Laundry Show describes the story of a laundry boss starring Gisel in achieving success..."
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SINOPSIS Laundry Show describes the story of a laundry boss starring Gisel in achieving success with business competition. Comedy drama genre film based on the novel by Uki Lukas.

Released in February 2019 under the auspices of the MVP production house, the film was directed by Rizky Balki.

This 97-minute film tells the story of Uki (Boy William) a young man who has a dream to become successful. In his spare time, Uki even often watches videos of his favorite motivator and learns a lot about success from there.

Sinopsis Laundry Show. (Foto: Instagram)

One day the idea that Uki was going to present in front of his boss was cheated by one of his coworkers. This made Uki irritated and chose to resign from the company.

Also Read: Wulan Guritno Sports Wearing a Black Bra, Body Singset Makes You Gaze!

With a desperate capital to have to drain the entire contents of his savings, Uki builds a laundry business. He even immediately recruited a number of employees who each had their own uniqueness and often irritated him.

Starting from Ujang (Fajar Nugraha) who is often late and likes to lie, Kendi (Mamat Alkatiri) who often takes sick leave, to Tiur who is bitchy and often gives discounts to handsome customers. This makes Uki stressed and dizzy facing his employees.

Not done taking care of his annoying employees, Uki has to accept a new reality. The emergence of a new laundry business that stands right across from the shop.

Agustina (Gisella Anastasia) is the boss of a laundry business located in front of Uki’s shophouse. With modern and super-sophisticated laundry equipment, the two businesses seem to be in fierce competition.

Nevertheless, Uki acknowledged the beauty of Agustina’s figure, whom he had met at a supermarket. However, he also cannot remain silent because he has to live and support his employees through the business he built himself, in order to make his mother happy.

Can Uki achieve success after resigning from his office? How is the business competition between Uki and Agustina? And how does Uki deal with his annoying employees?

" } ["summary"]=> string(98) "SINOPSIS Laundry Show describes the story of a laundry boss starring Gisel in achieving success..." ["atom_content"]=> string(2314) "

SINOPSIS Laundry Show describes the story of a laundry boss starring Gisel in achieving success with business competition. Comedy drama genre film based on the novel by Uki Lukas.

Released in February 2019 under the auspices of the MVP production house, the film was directed by Rizky Balki.

This 97-minute film tells the story of Uki (Boy William) a young man who has a dream to become successful. In his spare time, Uki even often watches videos of his favorite motivator and learns a lot about success from there.

Sinopsis Laundry Show. (Foto: Instagram)

One day the idea that Uki was going to present in front of his boss was cheated by one of his coworkers. This made Uki irritated and chose to resign from the company.

Also Read: Wulan Guritno Sports Wearing a Black Bra, Body Singset Makes You Gaze!

With a desperate capital to have to drain the entire contents of his savings, Uki builds a laundry business. He even immediately recruited a number of employees who each had their own uniqueness and often irritated him.

Starting from Ujang (Fajar Nugraha) who is often late and likes to lie, Kendi (Mamat Alkatiri) who often takes sick leave, to Tiur who is bitchy and often gives discounts to handsome customers. This makes Uki stressed and dizzy facing his employees.

Not done taking care of his annoying employees, Uki has to accept a new reality. The emergence of a new laundry business that stands right across from the shop.

Agustina (Gisella Anastasia) is the boss of a laundry business located in front of Uki’s shophouse. With modern and super-sophisticated laundry equipment, the two businesses seem to be in fierce competition.

Nevertheless, Uki acknowledged the beauty of Agustina’s figure, whom he had met at a supermarket. However, he also cannot remain silent because he has to live and support his employees through the business he built himself, in order to make his mother happy.

Can Uki achieve success after resigning from his office? How is the business competition between Uki and Agustina? And how does Uki deal with his annoying employees?

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630129820) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(78) "Comparing the pathogen numbers in backyard and commercial composts – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(137) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/comparing-the-pathogen-numbers-in-backyard-and-commercial-composts-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 28 Aug 2021 05:12:23 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(137) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/comparing-the-pathogen-numbers-in-backyard-and-commercial-composts-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(122) "Journal Reference: Yuqing Mao, Neslihan Akdeniz, Thanh H. Nguyen. Quantification of pathogens and antibiotic resistance..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5436) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Yuqing Mao, Neslihan Akdeniz, Thanh H. Nguyen. Quantification of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes in backyard and commercial composts. Science of The Total Environment, 2021; 797: 149197 DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.149197

“The main difference between backyard and commercial compost is the composition. Backyard compost is made from plant-based materials like vegetable scraps and coffee grounds because online tutorials recommend them. Additionally, animal-source materials are harder to compost. On the other hand, many of the commercial composts are made from farm manure,” said Yuqing Mao, a graduate student in the Nguyen lab.

Regardless of the source, the process of composting usually, but not always, gets rid of pathogens because it involves multiple stages of high heat. “There may be some pathogens that survive, either because they are heat resistant or they get introduced at a later stage,” Mao said.

The researchers collected samples of backyard compost from two gardeners at Urbana-Champaign and used six types of commercial compost, which were bought from the supermarket. They also used two control samples: soil that has never been treated with compost and immature compost, which has not been put through the high-temperature treatment. They extracted DNA samples and used qPCR to identify and measure the abundance of specific genes.

“We looked at airborne and foodborne pathogens. People are usually more concerned with the latter because they use the compost to grow vegetables,” Mao said. The researchers looked at the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and the airborne pathogens Mycobacterium spp., Legionella pneumophila, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since bacteria have very long DNA sequences, the study focused on genetic markers — genes that are unique to each organism.

“We did not find any Salmonella in our samples and E. coli was only present in the immature compost sample, meaning that if the compost is made properly, it is unlikely that they will get contaminated by foodborne pathogens,” Mao said. “On the other hand, we found that L. pneumophilia was present in four of the commercial samples but not in the other samples. The other two airborne pathogens were found in both backyard and commercial compost samples.”

Unfortunately, the qPCR method cannot distinguish between live and dead pathogens. The researchers hope that they can improve the method to detect only the viable cells so that they can better assess the threat to humans. Additionally, they would like to study more samples to validate their conclusions.

The group also looked at the number of antibiotic resistance genes across the samples. Bacterial communities that have higher frequencies of these genes are more likely to spread them, resulting in a dangerous problem. “Overall, the immature compost samples have the highest abundance of antibiotic resistance genes, indicating that the high heat during composting may degrade some of these genes,” Mao said.

It is unclear how the airborne pathogens are finding their way into the compost samples. The researchers are now trying to understand the source of contamination better so that they can help protect gardeners. “We also want to look at what composting conditions work best to remove these pathogens and the antibiotic resistance genes,” said Helen Nguyen (IGOH), Ivan Racheff Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Mao has prepared a set of guidelines for gardeners who are interested in using animal manure composting, which can be found here.

The paper “Quantification of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes in backyard and commercial composts” was published in Science of The Total Environment. Neslihan Akdeniz, a clinical assistant professor in agricultural and biological engineering, is a co-author on the paper and lent her expertise in composting with livestock manure.

The work was funded by the Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Environmental Protection Agency, and the United States Department of Agriculture.

Comparing the pathogen numbers in backyard and commercial composts

" } ["summary"]=> string(122) "Journal Reference: Yuqing Mao, Neslihan Akdeniz, Thanh H. Nguyen. Quantification of pathogens and antibiotic resistance..." ["atom_content"]=> string(5436) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Yuqing Mao, Neslihan Akdeniz, Thanh H. Nguyen. Quantification of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes in backyard and commercial composts. Science of The Total Environment, 2021; 797: 149197 DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.149197

“The main difference between backyard and commercial compost is the composition. Backyard compost is made from plant-based materials like vegetable scraps and coffee grounds because online tutorials recommend them. Additionally, animal-source materials are harder to compost. On the other hand, many of the commercial composts are made from farm manure,” said Yuqing Mao, a graduate student in the Nguyen lab.

Regardless of the source, the process of composting usually, but not always, gets rid of pathogens because it involves multiple stages of high heat. “There may be some pathogens that survive, either because they are heat resistant or they get introduced at a later stage,” Mao said.

The researchers collected samples of backyard compost from two gardeners at Urbana-Champaign and used six types of commercial compost, which were bought from the supermarket. They also used two control samples: soil that has never been treated with compost and immature compost, which has not been put through the high-temperature treatment. They extracted DNA samples and used qPCR to identify and measure the abundance of specific genes.

“We looked at airborne and foodborne pathogens. People are usually more concerned with the latter because they use the compost to grow vegetables,” Mao said. The researchers looked at the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica and the airborne pathogens Mycobacterium spp., Legionella pneumophila, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Since bacteria have very long DNA sequences, the study focused on genetic markers — genes that are unique to each organism.

“We did not find any Salmonella in our samples and E. coli was only present in the immature compost sample, meaning that if the compost is made properly, it is unlikely that they will get contaminated by foodborne pathogens,” Mao said. “On the other hand, we found that L. pneumophilia was present in four of the commercial samples but not in the other samples. The other two airborne pathogens were found in both backyard and commercial compost samples.”

Unfortunately, the qPCR method cannot distinguish between live and dead pathogens. The researchers hope that they can improve the method to detect only the viable cells so that they can better assess the threat to humans. Additionally, they would like to study more samples to validate their conclusions.

The group also looked at the number of antibiotic resistance genes across the samples. Bacterial communities that have higher frequencies of these genes are more likely to spread them, resulting in a dangerous problem. “Overall, the immature compost samples have the highest abundance of antibiotic resistance genes, indicating that the high heat during composting may degrade some of these genes,” Mao said.

It is unclear how the airborne pathogens are finding their way into the compost samples. The researchers are now trying to understand the source of contamination better so that they can help protect gardeners. “We also want to look at what composting conditions work best to remove these pathogens and the antibiotic resistance genes,” said Helen Nguyen (IGOH), Ivan Racheff Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Mao has prepared a set of guidelines for gardeners who are interested in using animal manure composting, which can be found here.

The paper “Quantification of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes in backyard and commercial composts” was published in Science of The Total Environment. Neslihan Akdeniz, a clinical assistant professor in agricultural and biological engineering, is a co-author on the paper and lent her expertise in composting with livestock manure.

The work was funded by the Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Environmental Protection Agency, and the United States Department of Agriculture.

Comparing the pathogen numbers in backyard and commercial composts

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630127543) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(72) "First 3D-bioprinted structured Wagyu beef-like meat unveiled – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(131) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/first-3d-bioprinted-structured-wagyu-beef-like-meat-unveiled-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 28 Aug 2021 04:10:29 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(131) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/first-3d-bioprinted-structured-wagyu-beef-like-meat-unveiled-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(117) "Journal Reference: Dong-Hee Kang, Fiona Louis, Hao Liu, Hiroshi Shimoda, Yasutaka Nishiyama, Hajime Nozawa, Makoto..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2466) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Dong-Hee Kang, Fiona Louis, Hao Liu, Hiroshi Shimoda, Yasutaka Nishiyama, Hajime Nozawa, Makoto Kakitani, Daisuke Takagi, Daijiro Kasa, Eiji Nagamori, Shinji Irie, Shiro Kitano, Michiya Matsusaki. Engineered whole cut meat-like tissue by the assembly of cell fibers using tendon-gel integrated bioprinting. Nature Communications, 2021; 12 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-25236-9

Now, a team of scientists led by Osaka University have used 3D-Printing to create synthetic meat that looks more like the real thing. “Using the histological structure of Wagyu beef as a blueprint, we have developed a 3D-printing method that can produce tailor-made complex structures, like muscle fibers, fat, and blood vessels,” lead author Dong-Hee Kang says. To overcome this challenge, the team started with two types of stem cells, called bovine satellite cells and adipose-derived stem cells. Under the right laboratory conditions, these “multipotent” cells can be coaxed to differentiate into every type of cell needed to produce the cultured meat.

Individual fibers including muscle, fat, or blood vessels were fabricated from these cells using bioprinting. The fibers were then arranged in 3D, following the histological structure, to reproduce the structure of the real Wagyu meat, which was finally sliced perpendicularly, in a similar way to the traditional Japanese candy Kintaro-ame. This process made the reconstruction of the complex meat tissue structure possible in a customizable manner. “By improving this technology, it will be possible to not only reproduce complex meat structures, such as the beautiful sashi of Wagyu beef, but to also make subtle adjustments to the fat and muscle components,” senior author Michiya Matsusaki says. That is, customers would be able to order cultured meat with their desired amount of fat, based on taste and health considerations.

https://novlink.co/raising-the-steaks-first-3d-bioprinted-structured-wagyu-beef-like-meat-unveiled/

" } ["summary"]=> string(117) "Journal Reference: Dong-Hee Kang, Fiona Louis, Hao Liu, Hiroshi Shimoda, Yasutaka Nishiyama, Hajime Nozawa, Makoto..." ["atom_content"]=> string(2466) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Dong-Hee Kang, Fiona Louis, Hao Liu, Hiroshi Shimoda, Yasutaka Nishiyama, Hajime Nozawa, Makoto Kakitani, Daisuke Takagi, Daijiro Kasa, Eiji Nagamori, Shinji Irie, Shiro Kitano, Michiya Matsusaki. Engineered whole cut meat-like tissue by the assembly of cell fibers using tendon-gel integrated bioprinting. Nature Communications, 2021; 12 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-25236-9

Now, a team of scientists led by Osaka University have used 3D-Printing to create synthetic meat that looks more like the real thing. “Using the histological structure of Wagyu beef as a blueprint, we have developed a 3D-printing method that can produce tailor-made complex structures, like muscle fibers, fat, and blood vessels,” lead author Dong-Hee Kang says. To overcome this challenge, the team started with two types of stem cells, called bovine satellite cells and adipose-derived stem cells. Under the right laboratory conditions, these “multipotent” cells can be coaxed to differentiate into every type of cell needed to produce the cultured meat.

Individual fibers including muscle, fat, or blood vessels were fabricated from these cells using bioprinting. The fibers were then arranged in 3D, following the histological structure, to reproduce the structure of the real Wagyu meat, which was finally sliced perpendicularly, in a similar way to the traditional Japanese candy Kintaro-ame. This process made the reconstruction of the complex meat tissue structure possible in a customizable manner. “By improving this technology, it will be possible to not only reproduce complex meat structures, such as the beautiful sashi of Wagyu beef, but to also make subtle adjustments to the fat and muscle components,” senior author Michiya Matsusaki says. That is, customers would be able to order cultured meat with their desired amount of fat, based on taste and health considerations.

https://novlink.co/raising-the-steaks-first-3d-bioprinted-structured-wagyu-beef-like-meat-unveiled/

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630123829) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(69) "A new way to investigate the electric double layer effect – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(128) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/a-new-way-to-investigate-the-electric-double-layer-effect-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 28 Aug 2021 03:08:52 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(128) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/a-new-way-to-investigate-the-electric-double-layer-effect-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(129) "Journal Reference: Takashi Tsuchiya, Makoto Takayanagi, Kazutaka Mitsuishi, Masataka Imura, Shigenori Ueda, Yasuo Koide, Tohru..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5274) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Takashi Tsuchiya, Makoto Takayanagi, Kazutaka Mitsuishi, Masataka Imura, Shigenori Ueda, Yasuo Koide, Tohru Higuchi, Kazuya Terabe. The electric double layer effect and its strong suppression at Li solid electrolyte/hydrogenated diamond interfaces. Communications Chemistry, 2021; 4 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s42004-021-00554-7

However, a key issue of these batteries is the high resistance found at the electrolyte-electrode interface, which reduces the output of all-solid-state batteries and prevents them from being charged rapidly. One discussed mechanism behind this high interface resistance is the electric double layer (EDL) effect, which involves the gathering of charged ions from an electrolyte at the interface with an electrode. This produces a layer of positive or negative charge, which in turns causes charge of the opposite sign to accumulate throughout the electrode at an equal density, creating a double layer of charges. The problem with detecting and measuring the EDL in all-solid-state batteries is that conventional electrochemical analysis methods don’t make the cut.

At Tokyo University of Science, Japan, scientists led by Associate Professor Tohru Higuchi have solved this conundrum using a completely new methodology for assessing the EDL effect in solid electrolytes of all-solid-state batteries. This study, published online in Nature’s Communications Chemistry, was conducted in collaboration with Takashi Tsuchiya, Principal Researcher at the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Japan, and Kazuya Terabe, MANA Principal Investigator at the same organization.

The new method revolves around field-effect transistors (FETs) made using hydrogenated diamond and a solid Li-based electrolyte. FETs are a three-terminal transistor in which the current between the source and drain electrodes can be controlled by applying a voltage at the gate electrode. This voltage, thanks to the electric field generated in the semiconductor region of the FET, controls the density of electrons or holes (‘electron vacancies’ with a positive charge). By exploiting these characteristics and using chemically inert diamond channels, the scientists ruled out chemical reduction-oxidation effects affecting the conductivity of the channel, leaving only the electrostatic charges accumulated thanks to the EDL effect as the necessary cause.

Accordingly, the scientists performed Hall effect measurements, which are sensitive to charged carriers only on the surface of materials, on the diamond electrodes. They used different types of Li-based electrolytes and investigated how their composition affected the EDL. Through their analyses, they revealed an important aspect of the EDL effect: it is dominated by the electrolyte’s composition in the immediate vicinity of the interface (about five nanometers in thickness). The EDL effect can be suppressed by several orders of magnitude if the electrolyte material allows for reduction-oxidation reactions that give way to charge compensation. “Our novel technique proved useful for revealing aspects of EDL behavior at the vicinity of solid electrolyte interfaces and helped clarify the effects of interface characteristics on the performance of all-solid-state Li-ion batteries and other ionic devices,” highlights Dr. Higuchi.

The team now plans to use their method to analyze the EDL effect in other electrolyte materials, hoping to find clues on how to reduce the interfacial resistance in next-generation batteries. “We hope that our approach will lead to the development of all-solid-state batteries with very high performance in the future,” concludes Dr. Higuchi. Moreover, understanding the EDL better will also aid in the development of capacitors, sensors, and memory and communication devices. Let us hope exploring this complex phenomenon becomes easier for other scientists so that the field of solid-state ionic devices keeps advancing.

A solid favor for researchers: A new way to investigate the electric double layer effect

" } ["summary"]=> string(129) "Journal Reference: Takashi Tsuchiya, Makoto Takayanagi, Kazutaka Mitsuishi, Masataka Imura, Shigenori Ueda, Yasuo Koide, Tohru..." ["atom_content"]=> string(5274) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Takashi Tsuchiya, Makoto Takayanagi, Kazutaka Mitsuishi, Masataka Imura, Shigenori Ueda, Yasuo Koide, Tohru Higuchi, Kazuya Terabe. The electric double layer effect and its strong suppression at Li solid electrolyte/hydrogenated diamond interfaces. Communications Chemistry, 2021; 4 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s42004-021-00554-7

However, a key issue of these batteries is the high resistance found at the electrolyte-electrode interface, which reduces the output of all-solid-state batteries and prevents them from being charged rapidly. One discussed mechanism behind this high interface resistance is the electric double layer (EDL) effect, which involves the gathering of charged ions from an electrolyte at the interface with an electrode. This produces a layer of positive or negative charge, which in turns causes charge of the opposite sign to accumulate throughout the electrode at an equal density, creating a double layer of charges. The problem with detecting and measuring the EDL in all-solid-state batteries is that conventional electrochemical analysis methods don’t make the cut.

At Tokyo University of Science, Japan, scientists led by Associate Professor Tohru Higuchi have solved this conundrum using a completely new methodology for assessing the EDL effect in solid electrolytes of all-solid-state batteries. This study, published online in Nature’s Communications Chemistry, was conducted in collaboration with Takashi Tsuchiya, Principal Researcher at the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Japan, and Kazuya Terabe, MANA Principal Investigator at the same organization.

The new method revolves around field-effect transistors (FETs) made using hydrogenated diamond and a solid Li-based electrolyte. FETs are a three-terminal transistor in which the current between the source and drain electrodes can be controlled by applying a voltage at the gate electrode. This voltage, thanks to the electric field generated in the semiconductor region of the FET, controls the density of electrons or holes (‘electron vacancies’ with a positive charge). By exploiting these characteristics and using chemically inert diamond channels, the scientists ruled out chemical reduction-oxidation effects affecting the conductivity of the channel, leaving only the electrostatic charges accumulated thanks to the EDL effect as the necessary cause.

Accordingly, the scientists performed Hall effect measurements, which are sensitive to charged carriers only on the surface of materials, on the diamond electrodes. They used different types of Li-based electrolytes and investigated how their composition affected the EDL. Through their analyses, they revealed an important aspect of the EDL effect: it is dominated by the electrolyte’s composition in the immediate vicinity of the interface (about five nanometers in thickness). The EDL effect can be suppressed by several orders of magnitude if the electrolyte material allows for reduction-oxidation reactions that give way to charge compensation. “Our novel technique proved useful for revealing aspects of EDL behavior at the vicinity of solid electrolyte interfaces and helped clarify the effects of interface characteristics on the performance of all-solid-state Li-ion batteries and other ionic devices,” highlights Dr. Higuchi.

The team now plans to use their method to analyze the EDL effect in other electrolyte materials, hoping to find clues on how to reduce the interfacial resistance in next-generation batteries. “We hope that our approach will lead to the development of all-solid-state batteries with very high performance in the future,” concludes Dr. Higuchi. Moreover, understanding the EDL better will also aid in the development of capacitors, sensors, and memory and communication devices. Let us hope exploring this complex phenomenon becomes easier for other scientists so that the field of solid-state ionic devices keeps advancing.

A solid favor for researchers: A new way to investigate the electric double layer effect

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630120132) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(88) "Oldest genome from Wallacea shows previously unknown ancient human relations – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(147) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/oldest-genome-from-wallacea-shows-previously-unknown-ancient-human-relations-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 28 Aug 2021 02:05:19 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(147) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/oldest-genome-from-wallacea-shows-previously-unknown-ancient-human-relations-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(114) "Journal Reference: Selina Carlhoff, Akin Duli, Kathrin Nägele, Muhammad Nur, Laurits Skov, Iwan Sumantri, Adhi..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5507) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Selina Carlhoff, Akin Duli, Kathrin Nägele, Muhammad Nur, Laurits Skov, Iwan Sumantri, Adhi Agus Oktaviana, Budianto Hakim, Basran Burhan, Fardi Ali Syahdar, David P. McGahan, David Bulbeck, Yinika L. Perston, Kim Newman, Andi Muhammad Saiful, Marlon Ririmasse, Stephen Chia, Hasanuddin, Dwia Aries Tina Pulubuhu, Suryatman, Supriadi, Choongwon Jeong, Benjamin M. Peter, Kay Prüfer, Adam Powell, Johannes Krause, Cosimo Posth & Adam Brumm. Genome of a middle Holocene hunter-gatherer from Wallacea. Nature, August 2021 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03823-6

The international study was accomplished through close collaboration with several researchers and institutions from Indonesia. It was headed by Professor Johannes Krause of the Max Planck Institutes for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the Science of Human History in Jena, Professor Cosimo Posth of the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen, and Professor Adam Brumm of Griffith University, Australia. The study has been published in the latest edition of Nature.

Almost completely preserved skeleton

The Wallacean Islands formed stepping stones in the spread of the first modern humans from Eurasia to Oceania, probably more than 50,000 years ago. Archaeological finds show that the ancestors of our species lived in Wallacea as early as 47,000 years ago. Yet few human skeletons have been found. One of the most distinctive archaeological discoveries in this region is the Toalean technology complex, dated to a much more recent period between 8,000 and 1,500 years ago. Among the objects manufactured by the people of the Toalean culture are the characteristic stone arrowheads known as Maros points. The Toalean culture has only been found in a relatively small area on the southern peninsula of Sulawesi. “We were able to assign the burial at Leang Panninge to that culture,” says Adam Brumm. “This is remarkable since it is the first largely complete and well preserved skeleton associated with the Toalean culture.”

Selina Carlhoff, doctoral candidate at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and lead author of the study, isolated DNA from the petrous bone of the skull. “It was a major challenge, as the remains had been strongly degraded by the tropical climate,” she says. The analysis showed that the Leang Panninge individual was related to the first modern humans to spread to Oceania from Eurasia some 50,000 years ago. Like the genome of the indigenous inhabitants of New Guinea and Australia, the Leang Panninge individual’s genome contained traces of Denisovan DNA. The Denisovans are an extinct group of archaic humans known primarily from finds in Siberia and Tibet. “The fact that their genes are found in the hunter-gatherers of Leang Panninge supports our earlier hypothesis that the Denisovans occupied a far larger geographical area,” says Johannes Krause.

Another piece in the great genetic puzzle

A comparison with genomic data of hunter-gatherers who lived west of Wallacea at about the same time as the Leang Panninge individual provided further clues — that data showed no traces of Denisovan DNA. “The geographic distribution of Denisovans and modern humans may have overlapped in the Wallacea region. It may well be the key place where Denisova people and the ancestors of indigenous Australians and Papuans interbred,” says Cosimo Posth.

However, the Leang Panninge individual also carries a large proportion of its genome from an ancient Asian population. “That came as a surprise, because we do know of the spread of modern humans from eastern Asia into the Wallacea region — but that took place far later, around 3,500 years ago. That was long after this individual was alive,” Johannes Krause reports. Furthermore, the research team has found no evidence that the group Leang Panninge belonged to left descendants among today’s population in Wallacea. It remains unclear what happened to the Toalean culture and its people. “This new piece of the genetic puzzle from Leang Panninge illustrates above all just how little we know about the genetic history of modern humans in southeast Asia,” Posth says.

Oldest genome from Wallacea shows previously unknown ancient human relations

" } ["summary"]=> string(114) "Journal Reference: Selina Carlhoff, Akin Duli, Kathrin Nägele, Muhammad Nur, Laurits Skov, Iwan Sumantri, Adhi..." ["atom_content"]=> string(5507) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Selina Carlhoff, Akin Duli, Kathrin Nägele, Muhammad Nur, Laurits Skov, Iwan Sumantri, Adhi Agus Oktaviana, Budianto Hakim, Basran Burhan, Fardi Ali Syahdar, David P. McGahan, David Bulbeck, Yinika L. Perston, Kim Newman, Andi Muhammad Saiful, Marlon Ririmasse, Stephen Chia, Hasanuddin, Dwia Aries Tina Pulubuhu, Suryatman, Supriadi, Choongwon Jeong, Benjamin M. Peter, Kay Prüfer, Adam Powell, Johannes Krause, Cosimo Posth & Adam Brumm. Genome of a middle Holocene hunter-gatherer from Wallacea. Nature, August 2021 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03823-6

The international study was accomplished through close collaboration with several researchers and institutions from Indonesia. It was headed by Professor Johannes Krause of the Max Planck Institutes for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the Science of Human History in Jena, Professor Cosimo Posth of the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen, and Professor Adam Brumm of Griffith University, Australia. The study has been published in the latest edition of Nature.

Almost completely preserved skeleton

The Wallacean Islands formed stepping stones in the spread of the first modern humans from Eurasia to Oceania, probably more than 50,000 years ago. Archaeological finds show that the ancestors of our species lived in Wallacea as early as 47,000 years ago. Yet few human skeletons have been found. One of the most distinctive archaeological discoveries in this region is the Toalean technology complex, dated to a much more recent period between 8,000 and 1,500 years ago. Among the objects manufactured by the people of the Toalean culture are the characteristic stone arrowheads known as Maros points. The Toalean culture has only been found in a relatively small area on the southern peninsula of Sulawesi. “We were able to assign the burial at Leang Panninge to that culture,” says Adam Brumm. “This is remarkable since it is the first largely complete and well preserved skeleton associated with the Toalean culture.”

Selina Carlhoff, doctoral candidate at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and lead author of the study, isolated DNA from the petrous bone of the skull. “It was a major challenge, as the remains had been strongly degraded by the tropical climate,” she says. The analysis showed that the Leang Panninge individual was related to the first modern humans to spread to Oceania from Eurasia some 50,000 years ago. Like the genome of the indigenous inhabitants of New Guinea and Australia, the Leang Panninge individual’s genome contained traces of Denisovan DNA. The Denisovans are an extinct group of archaic humans known primarily from finds in Siberia and Tibet. “The fact that their genes are found in the hunter-gatherers of Leang Panninge supports our earlier hypothesis that the Denisovans occupied a far larger geographical area,” says Johannes Krause.

Another piece in the great genetic puzzle

A comparison with genomic data of hunter-gatherers who lived west of Wallacea at about the same time as the Leang Panninge individual provided further clues — that data showed no traces of Denisovan DNA. “The geographic distribution of Denisovans and modern humans may have overlapped in the Wallacea region. It may well be the key place where Denisova people and the ancestors of indigenous Australians and Papuans interbred,” says Cosimo Posth.

However, the Leang Panninge individual also carries a large proportion of its genome from an ancient Asian population. “That came as a surprise, because we do know of the spread of modern humans from eastern Asia into the Wallacea region — but that took place far later, around 3,500 years ago. That was long after this individual was alive,” Johannes Krause reports. Furthermore, the research team has found no evidence that the group Leang Panninge belonged to left descendants among today’s population in Wallacea. It remains unclear what happened to the Toalean culture and its people. “This new piece of the genetic puzzle from Leang Panninge illustrates above all just how little we know about the genetic history of modern humans in southeast Asia,” Posth says.

Oldest genome from Wallacea shows previously unknown ancient human relations

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630116319) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(62) "Photosynthetic organisms during the Snowball Earth – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(121) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/photosynthetic-organisms-during-the-snowball-earth-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 28 Aug 2021 01:04:43 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(121) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/28/photosynthetic-organisms-during-the-snowball-earth-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(106) "Journal Reference: Atena Shizuya, Kunio Kaiho, Jinnan Tong. Marine biomass changes during and after the..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6083) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Atena Shizuya, Kunio Kaiho, Jinnan Tong. Marine biomass changes during and after the Neoproterozoic Marinoan global glaciation. Global and Planetary Change, 2021; 205: 103610 DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2021.103610

A research team from Tohoku University has unveiled more about the evolutionary process of the Marinoan-Ediacaran transition. Using biomarker evidence, they revealed possible photosynthetic activity during the Marinoan glaciation. This was followed by photosynthetic organisms and bacteria entering a period of low productivity. However, as eukaryotes expanded during the early Ediacaran period, they blossomed.

Dr. Kunio Kaiho, who co-authored a paper with Atena Shizuya, said, “Our findings help clarify the evolution of primitive to complex animals in the aftermath of the Snowball Earth.” Their paper online was published in the journal Global and Planetary Change on August 8, 2021.

The late Neoproterozoic era (650-530 million years ago) witnessed one of the most severe ice ages in the Earth’s 4.6-billion-year history. Researchers believe that ice sheets covered the entire earth since glaciogenic units, such as ice-rafted debris, are distributed globally. Overlaying these glaciogenic formations are cap carbonates. These precipitate under warm conditions and therefore suggest that the glacial environment changed rapidly into a greenhouse environment.

The Snowball Earth hypothesis purports the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration controlled the change from a frozen state to an ice-free state. Ice sheet-covered oceans prevented the dissolution of carbon dioxide into seawater during the Marinoan ice age, meaning greenhouse gas concentration, emitted by volcanic activity, increased gradually. Once the extreme greenhouse effect kicked in, glaciers melted and excess carbon dioxide precipitated on glaciogenic sediments as cap carbonates.

Whilst the Snowball Earth theory explains the wide distributions of glacial formations, it fails to shed light on the survival of living organisms. To counteract this, some researchers argue that sedimentary organic molecules, a molecular clock, and fossils from the late Neoproterozoic era are evidence that primitive eukaryotes such as sponges survived this severe ice age. Alternative models also propose that an ice-free open sea existed during the glaciation and acted as an oasis for marine life.

But what is understood is that the Marinoan glaciation and the succeeding extreme climatic transition likely had a marked impact on the biosphere. Shortly after the ice age, the Lantian biota, the earliest-known complex macroscopic multicellular eukaryotes, emerged. The Lantian biota includes macrofossils that are phylogenetically uncertain but morphologically and taxonomically diverse. Meanwhile, pre-Marinoan species have simple body plans with limited taxonomic variety.

Bacteria and eukaryote biomarkers demonstrate that bacteria dominated before the glaciation, whereas steranes/hopanes ratios illustrate that eukaryotes dominated just before it. However, the relationship between the biosphere changes and the Marinoan glaciation is unclear.

In 2011, Kaiho and his team traveled to Three Gorges, China under the guidance of China University of Science’s Dr. Jinnan Tong to take sedimentary rock samples from the deeper outcrops of marine sedimentary rocks. From 2015 onwards, Shizuya and Kaiho analyzed the biomarkers of algae, photosynthetic activity, bacteria, and eukaryotes from the rock samples.

They found photosynthetic activity based on n-C17 + n-C19 alkanes for algae and pristane + phytane during the Marinoan glaciation. Hopanes within the early and late carbonate deposition showed photosynthetic organisms and other bacteria entering a state of low productivity before recovering. And steranes from carbonates and mudstones after the cap carbonate deposition from the early Ediacaran period indicated the expansion of eukaryotes. The expansion of eukaryotes corresponded to the Lantian biota being morphologically diverse when compared to pre-Marinoan species.

Kaiho believes we are one step closer to understanding the evolutionary process that occurred before and after Snowball Earth. “The environmental stress of closed ocean environments for the atmosphere followed by high temperatures around 60°C may have produced more complex animals in the aftermath.” Their findings show that bacterial recovery preceded eukaryotes’ domination.

Kaiho’s team is doing further studies to clarify the relationship between climate change and the biosphere in other locations. They are also studying the relationship between atmospheric oxygen increases and animal evolution from the late Cryogenian to early Cambrian (650 to 500 million years ago).

Bacterial bloom as the Earth thawed: Photosynthetic organisms during the Snowball Earth

" } ["summary"]=> string(106) "Journal Reference: Atena Shizuya, Kunio Kaiho, Jinnan Tong. Marine biomass changes during and after the..." ["atom_content"]=> string(6083) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Atena Shizuya, Kunio Kaiho, Jinnan Tong. Marine biomass changes during and after the Neoproterozoic Marinoan global glaciation. Global and Planetary Change, 2021; 205: 103610 DOI: 10.1016/j.gloplacha.2021.103610

A research team from Tohoku University has unveiled more about the evolutionary process of the Marinoan-Ediacaran transition. Using biomarker evidence, they revealed possible photosynthetic activity during the Marinoan glaciation. This was followed by photosynthetic organisms and bacteria entering a period of low productivity. However, as eukaryotes expanded during the early Ediacaran period, they blossomed.

Dr. Kunio Kaiho, who co-authored a paper with Atena Shizuya, said, “Our findings help clarify the evolution of primitive to complex animals in the aftermath of the Snowball Earth.” Their paper online was published in the journal Global and Planetary Change on August 8, 2021.

The late Neoproterozoic era (650-530 million years ago) witnessed one of the most severe ice ages in the Earth’s 4.6-billion-year history. Researchers believe that ice sheets covered the entire earth since glaciogenic units, such as ice-rafted debris, are distributed globally. Overlaying these glaciogenic formations are cap carbonates. These precipitate under warm conditions and therefore suggest that the glacial environment changed rapidly into a greenhouse environment.

The Snowball Earth hypothesis purports the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration controlled the change from a frozen state to an ice-free state. Ice sheet-covered oceans prevented the dissolution of carbon dioxide into seawater during the Marinoan ice age, meaning greenhouse gas concentration, emitted by volcanic activity, increased gradually. Once the extreme greenhouse effect kicked in, glaciers melted and excess carbon dioxide precipitated on glaciogenic sediments as cap carbonates.

Whilst the Snowball Earth theory explains the wide distributions of glacial formations, it fails to shed light on the survival of living organisms. To counteract this, some researchers argue that sedimentary organic molecules, a molecular clock, and fossils from the late Neoproterozoic era are evidence that primitive eukaryotes such as sponges survived this severe ice age. Alternative models also propose that an ice-free open sea existed during the glaciation and acted as an oasis for marine life.

But what is understood is that the Marinoan glaciation and the succeeding extreme climatic transition likely had a marked impact on the biosphere. Shortly after the ice age, the Lantian biota, the earliest-known complex macroscopic multicellular eukaryotes, emerged. The Lantian biota includes macrofossils that are phylogenetically uncertain but morphologically and taxonomically diverse. Meanwhile, pre-Marinoan species have simple body plans with limited taxonomic variety.

Bacteria and eukaryote biomarkers demonstrate that bacteria dominated before the glaciation, whereas steranes/hopanes ratios illustrate that eukaryotes dominated just before it. However, the relationship between the biosphere changes and the Marinoan glaciation is unclear.

In 2011, Kaiho and his team traveled to Three Gorges, China under the guidance of China University of Science’s Dr. Jinnan Tong to take sedimentary rock samples from the deeper outcrops of marine sedimentary rocks. From 2015 onwards, Shizuya and Kaiho analyzed the biomarkers of algae, photosynthetic activity, bacteria, and eukaryotes from the rock samples.

They found photosynthetic activity based on n-C17 + n-C19 alkanes for algae and pristane + phytane during the Marinoan glaciation. Hopanes within the early and late carbonate deposition showed photosynthetic organisms and other bacteria entering a state of low productivity before recovering. And steranes from carbonates and mudstones after the cap carbonate deposition from the early Ediacaran period indicated the expansion of eukaryotes. The expansion of eukaryotes corresponded to the Lantian biota being morphologically diverse when compared to pre-Marinoan species.

Kaiho believes we are one step closer to understanding the evolutionary process that occurred before and after Snowball Earth. “The environmental stress of closed ocean environments for the atmosphere followed by high temperatures around 60°C may have produced more complex animals in the aftermath.” Their findings show that bacterial recovery preceded eukaryotes’ domination.

Kaiho’s team is doing further studies to clarify the relationship between climate change and the biosphere in other locations. They are also studying the relationship between atmospheric oxygen increases and animal evolution from the late Cryogenian to early Cambrian (650 to 500 million years ago).

Bacterial bloom as the Earth thawed: Photosynthetic organisms during the Snowball Earth

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630112683) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(86) "Treading wander paths to uncover the geological history of southwest Japan – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(145) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/27/treading-wander-paths-to-uncover-the-geological-history-of-southwest-japan-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 27 Aug 2021 23:59:51 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(145) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/27/treading-wander-paths-to-uncover-the-geological-history-of-southwest-japan-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(113) "Journal Reference: Koji Uno, Yuta Idehara, Daichi Morita, Kuniyuki Furukawa. An improved apparent polar wander..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4606) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Koji Uno, Yuta Idehara, Daichi Morita, Kuniyuki Furukawa. An improved apparent polar wander path for southwest Japan: post-Cretaceous multiphase rotations with respect to the Asian continent. Earth, Planets and Space, 2021; 73 (1) DOI: 10.1186/s40623-021-01457-6

From the APWPs, geologists can trace the movement of continents dating back millions of years. One important event was the opening of the Japan Sea in the Miocene epoch of the current geological era (Cenozoic), whereby southwest Japan drifted away from the Asian continent. However, not much is known regarding the tectonic history of the region for the preceding Mesozoic era.

In a study published in Earth, Planets and Space, researchers from Okayama University, Japan aimed to fill this gap, by constructing the Mesozoic APWP for southwest Japan. This information is useful to understand the tectonic activity in East Asia, as Professor Koji Uno, the lead scientist on the study, explains, “The construction of the Mesozoic APWP for southwest Japan would contribute to elucidating the intracontinental deformation history along the eastern margin of East Asia since the Mesozoic.”

The researchers initially conducted paleomagnetic analysis on sandstone and mudstone samples taken from southwest Japan. By measuring the remnant magnetization in the rock samples, they determined the 110 Ma paleomagnetic pole position. In addition to this, they derived the paleomagnetic pole positions based on data from other studies to construct an APWP for southwest Japan during the mid to Late Cretaceous every 10 million years i.e. 90, 80, and 70 Ma. Combining their data with data on the well-established Miocene paleomagnetic poles, the researchers obtained the APWPs that highlighted the movement of southwestern Japan from the Cretaceous in the Mesozoic era to the Cenozoic era (110 million years to 12 Ma).

Comparing the APWPs of southwest Japan to that of East Asia, the researchers found the pole positions to be stationary between 110 Ma and 70 Ma implying that southwest Japan was a stable part of East Asia during the Cretaceous. However, post-Cretaceous, in the Cenozoic era, two clockwise rotations in the pole positions were found. The researchers interpret these as tectonic rotations of southwest Japan. “The earlier rotation occurred during the Paleogene (between 70 and 20 Ma), when southwest Japan was attached to the Korean Peninsula, as part of the East Tan-Lu Block. During the Neogene (between 20 and 12 Ma), the later rotation occurred, and southwest Japan detached from the East Tan-Lu Block to form the Japan Sea,” elaborates Prof. Uno.

These findings highlight the interaction of southwest Japan with East Asia and improve the understanding of the tectonic history of the region. Prof. Uno observes, “It is suggested that the interior of southwestern Japan was stably preserved, despite it experiencing a large tectonic event, the formation of the Japan Sea. Previous studies have shown that Kibi Plateau, the area where new data was obtained in our study, was a stable continental ground; the results of our study also support this idea. This is an important piece of evidence for the relative geological stability of the Japanese islands.”

Truly, unraveling history, even if it is the geological history of Earth, needs treading on the paths wandered along previously by the planet.

Treading wander paths to uncover the geological history of southwest Japan

" } ["summary"]=> string(113) "Journal Reference: Koji Uno, Yuta Idehara, Daichi Morita, Kuniyuki Furukawa. An improved apparent polar wander..." ["atom_content"]=> string(4606) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Koji Uno, Yuta Idehara, Daichi Morita, Kuniyuki Furukawa. An improved apparent polar wander path for southwest Japan: post-Cretaceous multiphase rotations with respect to the Asian continent. Earth, Planets and Space, 2021; 73 (1) DOI: 10.1186/s40623-021-01457-6

From the APWPs, geologists can trace the movement of continents dating back millions of years. One important event was the opening of the Japan Sea in the Miocene epoch of the current geological era (Cenozoic), whereby southwest Japan drifted away from the Asian continent. However, not much is known regarding the tectonic history of the region for the preceding Mesozoic era.

In a study published in Earth, Planets and Space, researchers from Okayama University, Japan aimed to fill this gap, by constructing the Mesozoic APWP for southwest Japan. This information is useful to understand the tectonic activity in East Asia, as Professor Koji Uno, the lead scientist on the study, explains, “The construction of the Mesozoic APWP for southwest Japan would contribute to elucidating the intracontinental deformation history along the eastern margin of East Asia since the Mesozoic.”

The researchers initially conducted paleomagnetic analysis on sandstone and mudstone samples taken from southwest Japan. By measuring the remnant magnetization in the rock samples, they determined the 110 Ma paleomagnetic pole position. In addition to this, they derived the paleomagnetic pole positions based on data from other studies to construct an APWP for southwest Japan during the mid to Late Cretaceous every 10 million years i.e. 90, 80, and 70 Ma. Combining their data with data on the well-established Miocene paleomagnetic poles, the researchers obtained the APWPs that highlighted the movement of southwestern Japan from the Cretaceous in the Mesozoic era to the Cenozoic era (110 million years to 12 Ma).

Comparing the APWPs of southwest Japan to that of East Asia, the researchers found the pole positions to be stationary between 110 Ma and 70 Ma implying that southwest Japan was a stable part of East Asia during the Cretaceous. However, post-Cretaceous, in the Cenozoic era, two clockwise rotations in the pole positions were found. The researchers interpret these as tectonic rotations of southwest Japan. “The earlier rotation occurred during the Paleogene (between 70 and 20 Ma), when southwest Japan was attached to the Korean Peninsula, as part of the East Tan-Lu Block. During the Neogene (between 20 and 12 Ma), the later rotation occurred, and southwest Japan detached from the East Tan-Lu Block to form the Japan Sea,” elaborates Prof. Uno.

These findings highlight the interaction of southwest Japan with East Asia and improve the understanding of the tectonic history of the region. Prof. Uno observes, “It is suggested that the interior of southwestern Japan was stably preserved, despite it experiencing a large tectonic event, the formation of the Japan Sea. Previous studies have shown that Kibi Plateau, the area where new data was obtained in our study, was a stable continental ground; the results of our study also support this idea. This is an important piece of evidence for the relative geological stability of the Japanese islands.”

Truly, unraveling history, even if it is the geological history of Earth, needs treading on the paths wandered along previously by the planet.

Treading wander paths to uncover the geological history of southwest Japan

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630108791) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(58) "Food safety model may help pandemic management – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(117) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/27/food-safety-model-may-help-pandemic-management-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 27 Aug 2021 22:56:47 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(117) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/27/food-safety-model-may-help-pandemic-management-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(103) "Journal Reference: Julie Henderson, Paul R. Ward, Emma Tonkin, Samantha B. Meyer, Heath Pillen, Dean..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3851) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Julie Henderson, Paul R. Ward, Emma Tonkin, Samantha B. Meyer, Heath Pillen, Dean McCullum, Barbara Toson, Trevor Webb, John Coveney, Annabelle Wilson. Developing and Maintaining Public Trust During and Post-COVID-19: Can We Apply a Model Developed for Responding to Food Scares? Frontiers in Public Health, 2020; 8 DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2020.00369

“It’s crucial that the public does not lose trust in governments and the officials communicating information during a crisis,” says Dr Annabelle Wilson from the College of Medicine and Public Health at Flinders University.

“The key is to be transparent in messaging. Our model was developed to address food incidents and it highlights strategies to use to communicate effectively with the public. The same ideas make sense in a COVID-19 situation.”

The Flinders researchers’ model identifies10 strategies, including transparency; development of protocols and procedures; credibility; proactivity; putting the public first; collaborating with stakeholders; consistency; education of stakeholders and the public; building your reputation; and keeping your promises.

The model has been has presented to key government bodies including SA Health and Food Standards Australia New Zealand, and the original work was then replicated in Ireland.

“We have found that in times of crisis through a major food incident — when the public may doubt who they trust — it is imperative that the messages of the food regulators and government authorities are trusted so that the public can act accordingly in line with recommendations.

“Therefore, the model we created focuses on how authorities can best communicate key messages to the public — which in a pandemic involves key behaviours like social distancing.”

While pandemic management differs from a food incident — as the responsibility to act is with the public rather than identifiable regulatory bodies, and governments must weigh competing risks in creating policy — the Flinders researchers conclude that many of the strategies identified in their food trust model could be successfully applied to the maintenance of trust in public health officials prior to, during, and after pandemics.

“The ultimate goal is to maximise trust between the public and governments in Australia, to support public adherence of public health recommendations in response to COVID-19, such as social distancing and isolation,” says Dr Wilson.

“Ideally, we would like to test the application of this model in the COVID-19 pandemic context, and then roll it out for use by state and federal governments across Australia. We currently have a grant application under review to ideally help us to do this.”

Food safety model may help pandemic management

" } ["summary"]=> string(103) "Journal Reference: Julie Henderson, Paul R. Ward, Emma Tonkin, Samantha B. Meyer, Heath Pillen, Dean..." ["atom_content"]=> string(3851) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Julie Henderson, Paul R. Ward, Emma Tonkin, Samantha B. Meyer, Heath Pillen, Dean McCullum, Barbara Toson, Trevor Webb, John Coveney, Annabelle Wilson. Developing and Maintaining Public Trust During and Post-COVID-19: Can We Apply a Model Developed for Responding to Food Scares? Frontiers in Public Health, 2020; 8 DOI: 10.3389/fpubh.2020.00369

“It’s crucial that the public does not lose trust in governments and the officials communicating information during a crisis,” says Dr Annabelle Wilson from the College of Medicine and Public Health at Flinders University.

“The key is to be transparent in messaging. Our model was developed to address food incidents and it highlights strategies to use to communicate effectively with the public. The same ideas make sense in a COVID-19 situation.”

The Flinders researchers’ model identifies10 strategies, including transparency; development of protocols and procedures; credibility; proactivity; putting the public first; collaborating with stakeholders; consistency; education of stakeholders and the public; building your reputation; and keeping your promises.

The model has been has presented to key government bodies including SA Health and Food Standards Australia New Zealand, and the original work was then replicated in Ireland.

“We have found that in times of crisis through a major food incident — when the public may doubt who they trust — it is imperative that the messages of the food regulators and government authorities are trusted so that the public can act accordingly in line with recommendations.

“Therefore, the model we created focuses on how authorities can best communicate key messages to the public — which in a pandemic involves key behaviours like social distancing.”

While pandemic management differs from a food incident — as the responsibility to act is with the public rather than identifiable regulatory bodies, and governments must weigh competing risks in creating policy — the Flinders researchers conclude that many of the strategies identified in their food trust model could be successfully applied to the maintenance of trust in public health officials prior to, during, and after pandemics.

“The ultimate goal is to maximise trust between the public and governments in Australia, to support public adherence of public health recommendations in response to COVID-19, such as social distancing and isolation,” says Dr Wilson.

“Ideally, we would like to test the application of this model in the COVID-19 pandemic context, and then roll it out for use by state and federal governments across Australia. We currently have a grant application under review to ideally help us to do this.”

Food safety model may help pandemic management

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630105007) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(90) "MOGONET provides more holistic view of biological processes underlying disease – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(149) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/27/mogonet-provides-more-holistic-view-of-biological-processes-underlying-disease-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 27 Aug 2021 21:55:34 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(149) "https://theghana-italynews.com/health-science-news/2021/08/27/mogonet-provides-more-holistic-view-of-biological-processes-underlying-disease-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(99) "Journal Reference: Tongxin Wang, Wei Shao, Zhi Huang, Haixu Tang, Jie Zhang, Zhengming Ding, Kun..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5108) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Tongxin Wang, Wei Shao, Zhi Huang, Haixu Tang, Jie Zhang, Zhengming Ding, Kun Huang. MOGONET integrates multi-omics data using graph convolutional networks allowing patient classification and biomarker identification. Nature Communications, 2021; 12 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-23774-w

To fully utilize the advances in omics technologies to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the biological processes underlying human diseases, researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana, Purdue and Tulane Universities have developed and tested MOGONET, a novel multi-omics data analysis algorithm and computational methodology. Integrating data from various omics provides a more holistic view of biological processes underlying human diseases. The creators have made MOGONET open source, free and accessible to all researchers.

In a study published in Nature Communications, the scientists demonstrated that MOGONET, short for Multi-Omics Graph cOnvolutional NETworks, outperforms existing supervised multi-omics integrative analysis approaches of different biomedical classification applications using mRNA expression data, DNA methylation data, and microRNA expression data.

They also determined that MOGONET can identify important omics signatures and biomarkers from different omics data types.

“With MOGONET, our new AI [artificial intelligence] tool, we employ machine learning based on a neural network, to capture complex biological process relationships. We have made the understanding of omics more comprehensive and also are learning more about disease subtypes that biomarkers help us differentiate,” said Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Kun Huang, PhD, who led the study. “The ultimate goal is to improve disease prognosis and enhance disease-outcome predictions.” A bioinformatician, he credits the diversity of the MOGONET research group, which included computer scientists as well as data scientists and bioinformaticians, with their varying perspectives, as instrumental in its development and success. He serves as director of data sciences and informatics for the Indiana University Precision Health Initiative.

The researchers tested MOGONET on datasets related to o Alzheimer’s disease, gliomas, kidney cancer and breast invasive carcinoma as well as on healthy patient datasets. They determined MOGONET handily outperformed existing supervised multi-omics integration methods.

“Learning and integrating intuitive recognition, MOGONET could generate new biomarker disease candidates,”said study co-author Regenstrief Institute Affiliated Scientist Jie Zhang, PhD, a bioinformatician. “MOGONET also could predict new cancer subtypes, tumor grade and disease progression. It can identify normal brain activity versus Alzheimer’s disease.”

Drs. Huang and Zhang plan to expand this work beyond omics to include imaging data, noting the abundance of brain images for AD and cancer-related pathology images which can teach MOGONET to recognize even cases it had not previously encountered. Both scientists note that following rigorous clinical studies, MOGONET could support improved patient care in many areas.

In addition to Drs. Huang and Zhang, authors of “MOGONET integrates multi-omics data using graph convolutional networks allowing patient classification and biomarker identification” are Tongxin Wang, PhD, and Haixu Tang, PhD, of Indiana University, Wei Shao, PhD, of IU School of Medicine; Zhi Huang of IU School of Medicine and Purdue University; and Zhengming Ding, PhD of Tulane University. Dr. Wang worked in Dr. Huang’s laboratory. Dr. Ding, formerly of Indiana University, is an expert in the field of machine learning.

The development and testing of MOGONET was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01EB025018 and U54AG065181 and the Indiana University Precision Health Initiative.

MOGONET provides more holistic view of biological processes underlying disease

" } ["summary"]=> string(99) "Journal Reference: Tongxin Wang, Wei Shao, Zhi Huang, Haixu Tang, Jie Zhang, Zhengming Ding, Kun..." ["atom_content"]=> string(5108) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Tongxin Wang, Wei Shao, Zhi Huang, Haixu Tang, Jie Zhang, Zhengming Ding, Kun Huang. MOGONET integrates multi-omics data using graph convolutional networks allowing patient classification and biomarker identification. Nature Communications, 2021; 12 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-23774-w

To fully utilize the advances in omics technologies to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the biological processes underlying human diseases, researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana, Purdue and Tulane Universities have developed and tested MOGONET, a novel multi-omics data analysis algorithm and computational methodology. Integrating data from various omics provides a more holistic view of biological processes underlying human diseases. The creators have made MOGONET open source, free and accessible to all researchers.

In a study published in Nature Communications, the scientists demonstrated that MOGONET, short for Multi-Omics Graph cOnvolutional NETworks, outperforms existing supervised multi-omics integrative analysis approaches of different biomedical classification applications using mRNA expression data, DNA methylation data, and microRNA expression data.

They also determined that MOGONET can identify important omics signatures and biomarkers from different omics data types.

“With MOGONET, our new AI [artificial intelligence] tool, we employ machine learning based on a neural network, to capture complex biological process relationships. We have made the understanding of omics more comprehensive and also are learning more about disease subtypes that biomarkers help us differentiate,” said Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Kun Huang, PhD, who led the study. “The ultimate goal is to improve disease prognosis and enhance disease-outcome predictions.” A bioinformatician, he credits the diversity of the MOGONET research group, which included computer scientists as well as data scientists and bioinformaticians, with their varying perspectives, as instrumental in its development and success. He serves as director of data sciences and informatics for the Indiana University Precision Health Initiative.

The researchers tested MOGONET on datasets related to o Alzheimer’s disease, gliomas, kidney cancer and breast invasive carcinoma as well as on healthy patient datasets. They determined MOGONET handily outperformed existing supervised multi-omics integration methods.

“Learning and integrating intuitive recognition, MOGONET could generate new biomarker disease candidates,”said study co-author Regenstrief Institute Affiliated Scientist Jie Zhang, PhD, a bioinformatician. “MOGONET also could predict new cancer subtypes, tumor grade and disease progression. It can identify normal brain activity versus Alzheimer’s disease.”

Drs. Huang and Zhang plan to expand this work beyond omics to include imaging data, noting the abundance of brain images for AD and cancer-related pathology images which can teach MOGONET to recognize even cases it had not previously encountered. Both scientists note that following rigorous clinical studies, MOGONET could support improved patient care in many areas.

In addition to Drs. Huang and Zhang, authors of “MOGONET integrates multi-omics data using graph convolutional networks allowing patient classification and biomarker identification” are Tongxin Wang, PhD, and Haixu Tang, PhD, of Indiana University, Wei Shao, PhD, of IU School of Medicine; Zhi Huang of IU School of Medicine and Purdue University; and Zhengming Ding, PhD of Tulane University. Dr. Wang worked in Dr. Huang’s laboratory. Dr. Ding, formerly of Indiana University, is an expert in the field of machine learning.

The development and testing of MOGONET was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01EB025018 and U54AG065181 and the Indiana University Precision Health Initiative.

MOGONET provides more holistic view of biological processes underlying disease

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630101334) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(54) "Handanovic disaster, Lautaro makes 50. Fabulous Correa" ["link"]=> string(102) "https://theghana-italynews.com/sports/2021/08/27/handanovic-disaster-lautaro-makes-50-fabulous-correa/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 27 Aug 2021 21:30:55 +0000" ["category"]=> string(98) "SportingsA leagueCorreadisasterDzekoFabulousHandanovicinterLautaroreport cardssimone inzaghiVerona" ["guid"]=> string(102) "https://theghana-italynews.com/sports/2021/08/27/handanovic-disaster-lautaro-makes-50-fabulous-correa/" ["description"]=> string(96) "Inter wins in comeback at Bentegodi (3-1) with Hellas Verona. Advantage of the Scaligeri with..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5514) "

Inter wins in comeback at Bentegodi (3-1) with Hellas Verona. Advantage of the Scaligeri with Ilic, Lautaro and Correa (double in the final of the matc) think about it to give Inzaghi the second consecutive victory in the championship.

REPORT CARDS OF HELLAS VERONA

MONTIPO 6
Show that you have important qualities. Safe when there is also to manage the ball with the feet. He can’t do anything about Inter’s goals.

MAGNANI 6
Track Dzeko in every area of ​​the pitch. It takes a lot of physicality and desire. Despite the yellow, he fights with heart. Drops in the second half (30′ st Dawidowicz 5,5: on the goal is not in the correct position).

GUNTER 6
He occupies the position with great care. He knows what to do and does it carefully. It grants little.

SNIPERS 6.5
It seems there are at least three in the field. It’s everywhere. He presses obsessively and also has good clarity when he has to set. Comes out due to injury (8 ‘st Casale 5: fights with little ardor).

PHARAOHS 6
Good at always being found in the support phase. It gives balance to the team, especially when Inter restart (30 ‘st Sutalo 5,5: late, does not enter in the best way).

HONGLA 5,5
First half of great personality but in the second half it is less concrete. On the action of Lautaro’s peer is inaccurate (30 ‘st Thames 5.5: freshness but little precision).

ILIC 6,5
Extraordinary goal, confirming the qualities of the young Serbian. Solid and careful performance.

LAZOVIC 6,5
The headband is eaten. Always ready to seek depth. He never makes banal plays and, in defense, he is precise. Piston.

BARAK 6
It fits in and defends with fervor. A lot of heart but also an excellent sense of position. Illuminated.

ZACCAGNI 6.5
A couple of real 10’s. It has a special game vision. It makes the Nerazzurri defense suffer.

CHANCELLORS 6.5
In his first time as a starter, the golden boy from Verona offers high-quality plays. A little unfortunate at the time of the shot. Promise (16′ st Lasagna 5: seeks depth, does not find it).

BY FRANCIS 6
He undermines the Nerazzurri’s certainties with suffocating pressure and a frenzied pace. Celestial first time. The matches last two halves. Betrayed by the changes.

INTER REPORT CARDS

HANDANOVIC 4
A very serious mistake that is worth the advantage of Hellas and extinguishes the initial enthusiasm of Inter. Not the first mistake.

SKRINIAR 6.5
He has to struggle enormously against the many opponents that run around him. He gets away with experience and with his explosive physicality.

THE FREE 6,5
Elegant as always, also try to lend a hand in the setting phase. He has to try harder than usual.

STICKS 6
On a couple of occasions he gets caught off guard. In difficulty even in the measure of the passages. It resumes in the second half.

DARMIAN 6.5
Lazovic commits him severely. Duel rustic. He has the merit of never giving up and making Correa’s 2-1 ball.

STRETCHER 6
It tries to light up but it goes intermittently. A little too nervous too. He has little time to think. Continue to grind the pitch and the balls.

BROZOVIC 5.5
He is not given time to raise his head. Always forced to play in an emergency. Caged (21′ st Vidal 7: garra in the middle of the field, it makes the difference).

CALHANOGLU 5,5
Excellent against Genoa, non-existent against Hellas. He wanders the field in search of a space he never finds. Worn out (44 ‘st Vecino ng).

PERISIC 5,5
It is proposed but does not affect the band. During the defensive phase he is often forced to work overtime (21′ st Dimarco 6,5: a lot of leg and a lot of desire).

DZEKO 6
Superfine feet but never kicks on goal. Play for others but above all he would be a striker. More wickedness is needed (44 ‘st Sensi ng).

LAUTARO 6,5
On his seasonal debut, he scored a very heavy goal, the 50th for the Nerazzurri. True striker, great sense of the net (28′ st Correa 8: his dream debut in the Nerazzurri. The quality is there, the brace as well. Special).

INZAGHI 6.5
Surprised by Di Francesco. The team falters in the first but, in the second half, they find their Inter again. Guess all the changes.


Last updated: Friday 27 August 2021, 22:47


© REPRODUCTION RESERVED

.

" } ["summary"]=> string(96) "Inter wins in comeback at Bentegodi (3-1) with Hellas Verona. Advantage of the Scaligeri with..." ["atom_content"]=> string(5514) "

Inter wins in comeback at Bentegodi (3-1) with Hellas Verona. Advantage of the Scaligeri with Ilic, Lautaro and Correa (double in the final of the matc) think about it to give Inzaghi the second consecutive victory in the championship.

REPORT CARDS OF HELLAS VERONA

MONTIPO 6
Show that you have important qualities. Safe when there is also to manage the ball with the feet. He can’t do anything about Inter’s goals.

MAGNANI 6
Track Dzeko in every area of ​​the pitch. It takes a lot of physicality and desire. Despite the yellow, he fights with heart. Drops in the second half (30′ st Dawidowicz 5,5: on the goal is not in the correct position).

GUNTER 6
He occupies the position with great care. He knows what to do and does it carefully. It grants little.

SNIPERS 6.5
It seems there are at least three in the field. It’s everywhere. He presses obsessively and also has good clarity when he has to set. Comes out due to injury (8 ‘st Casale 5: fights with little ardor).

PHARAOHS 6
Good at always being found in the support phase. It gives balance to the team, especially when Inter restart (30 ‘st Sutalo 5,5: late, does not enter in the best way).

HONGLA 5,5
First half of great personality but in the second half it is less concrete. On the action of Lautaro’s peer is inaccurate (30 ‘st Thames 5.5: freshness but little precision).

ILIC 6,5
Extraordinary goal, confirming the qualities of the young Serbian. Solid and careful performance.

LAZOVIC 6,5
The headband is eaten. Always ready to seek depth. He never makes banal plays and, in defense, he is precise. Piston.

BARAK 6
It fits in and defends with fervor. A lot of heart but also an excellent sense of position. Illuminated.

ZACCAGNI 6.5
A couple of real 10’s. It has a special game vision. It makes the Nerazzurri defense suffer.

CHANCELLORS 6.5
In his first time as a starter, the golden boy from Verona offers high-quality plays. A little unfortunate at the time of the shot. Promise (16′ st Lasagna 5: seeks depth, does not find it).

BY FRANCIS 6
He undermines the Nerazzurri’s certainties with suffocating pressure and a frenzied pace. Celestial first time. The matches last two halves. Betrayed by the changes.

INTER REPORT CARDS

HANDANOVIC 4
A very serious mistake that is worth the advantage of Hellas and extinguishes the initial enthusiasm of Inter. Not the first mistake.

SKRINIAR 6.5
He has to struggle enormously against the many opponents that run around him. He gets away with experience and with his explosive physicality.

THE FREE 6,5
Elegant as always, also try to lend a hand in the setting phase. He has to try harder than usual.

STICKS 6
On a couple of occasions he gets caught off guard. In difficulty even in the measure of the passages. It resumes in the second half.

DARMIAN 6.5
Lazovic commits him severely. Duel rustic. He has the merit of never giving up and making Correa’s 2-1 ball.

STRETCHER 6
It tries to light up but it goes intermittently. A little too nervous too. He has little time to think. Continue to grind the pitch and the balls.

BROZOVIC 5.5
He is not given time to raise his head. Always forced to play in an emergency. Caged (21′ st Vidal 7: garra in the middle of the field, it makes the difference).

CALHANOGLU 5,5
Excellent against Genoa, non-existent against Hellas. He wanders the field in search of a space he never finds. Worn out (44 ‘st Vecino ng).

PERISIC 5,5
It is proposed but does not affect the band. During the defensive phase he is often forced to work overtime (21′ st Dimarco 6,5: a lot of leg and a lot of desire).

DZEKO 6
Superfine feet but never kicks on goal. Play for others but above all he would be a striker. More wickedness is needed (44 ‘st Sensi ng).

LAUTARO 6,5
On his seasonal debut, he scored a very heavy goal, the 50th for the Nerazzurri. True striker, great sense of the net (28′ st Correa 8: his dream debut in the Nerazzurri. The quality is there, the brace as well. Special).

INZAGHI 6.5
Surprised by Di Francesco. The team falters in the first but, in the second half, they find their Inter again. Guess all the changes.


Last updated: Friday 27 August 2021, 22:47


© REPRODUCTION RESERVED

.

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