OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.

Example Output

Channel: North Carolina Chronicle

RSS URL:

Parsed Results (var_dump'ed)

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  resource(4) of type (Unknown)
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    array(11) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(94) "Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June"
      ["link"]=>
      string(127) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/charlotte-thunder-is-preparing-to-host-the-championship-game-on-saturday-june-26th-before-june/"
      ["dc"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["creator"]=>
        string(10) "Bill Moran"
      }
      ["pubdate"]=>
      string(31) "Sun, 20 Jun 2021 09:17:58 +0000"
      ["category"]=>
      string(9) "Charlotte"
      ["guid"]=>
      string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8638"
      ["description"]=>
      string(1728) "
Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June

CHARLOTTE, NC – The Charlotte Thunder are just one game away from ending their season with a picture-perfect ending. The Thunder (10-0) will play for the American Arena League Championship against the North Texas Bulls at Bojangles’ Coliseum on Saturday, June 26th. Charlotte has dominated every team they have faced this season by their narrowest […]

The post Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2311) "
Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June

CHARLOTTE, NC – The Charlotte Thunder are just one game away from ending their season with a picture-perfect ending. The Thunder (10-0) will play for the American Arena League Championship against the North Texas Bulls at Bojangles’ Coliseum on Saturday, June 26th.

Charlotte has dominated every team they have faced this season by their narrowest lead of an impressive 35 points.

“We played so well all season but we haven’t really reached the climax we need on offense,” said Thunder head coach Ervin Bryson.

Despite what coach Bryson said, the Thunder averaged 69 points per game.

The Thunder ended the regular season on June 6, so the team should be well rested when they take the field for the championship game.

“I think our guys are still working and hungry enough to enable us to go out and take this win easily.”

You can buy tickets for the game here.

The post Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1728) "
Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June

CHARLOTTE, NC – The Charlotte Thunder are just one game away from ending their season with a picture-perfect ending. The Thunder (10-0) will play for the American Arena League Championship against the North Texas Bulls at Bojangles’ Coliseum on Saturday, June 26th. Charlotte has dominated every team they have faced this season by their narrowest […]

The post Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2311) "
Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June

CHARLOTTE, NC – The Charlotte Thunder are just one game away from ending their season with a picture-perfect ending. The Thunder (10-0) will play for the American Arena League Championship against the North Texas Bulls at Bojangles’ Coliseum on Saturday, June 26th.

Charlotte has dominated every team they have faced this season by their narrowest lead of an impressive 35 points.

“We played so well all season but we haven’t really reached the climax we need on offense,” said Thunder head coach Ervin Bryson.

Despite what coach Bryson said, the Thunder averaged 69 points per game.

The Thunder ended the regular season on June 6, so the team should be well rested when they take the field for the championship game.

“I think our guys are still working and hungry enough to enable us to go out and take this win easily.”

You can buy tickets for the game here.

The post Charlotte Thunder is preparing to host the championship game on Saturday June 26th before June first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624180678) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(63) "Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance | Columnists" ["link"]=> string(92) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/suresh-chandra-pathetic-spectacle-of-intolerance-columnists/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sun, 20 Jun 2021 06:23:33 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8635" ["description"]=> string(1281) "
Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance |  Columnists

After living in Greensboro for 49 years up until last November, I was deeply struck by the story in Allen Johnson’s new column (June 7th) describing the abusive behavior of some drivers while walking in his neighborhood. Despite numerous incidents of violence and vicious racial slurs against blacks, Jews, Asians, and Hispanic Americans, I really […]

The post Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance | Columnists first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2467) "
Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance |  Columnists

After living in Greensboro for 49 years up until last November, I was deeply struck by the story in Allen Johnson’s new column (June 7th) describing the abusive behavior of some drivers while walking in his neighborhood. Despite numerous incidents of violence and vicious racial slurs against blacks, Jews, Asians, and Hispanic Americans, I really want to believe that there is a very small minority who behave so despicably. The fact is, however, that these marginalized groups can and will cause irreparable damage to a society that is so diverse in religion, ethnicity, national origin and skin color.

These incidents of bigotry and hatred contradict claims that America is a melting pot or a country where people have successfully assimilated as proud Americans. The guarantee of equal rights for all citizens through our constitution is seen as a farce in the eyes of the world. What right do we have to teach other countries about human rights and justice when we so blatantly fail our fellow citizens about tolerance and respect?

I find it ironic that intolerance of the presence or points of view of others is not limited to one race. There are people of all races, albeit in very small numbers, who participate in atrocities inflicted on people of other races. The resurgence of attacks on Asians and Jews is a classic example. Despite impressive advances made by the civil rights movement that began in the early 1960s, sporadic incidents of police brutality and excessive use of force are still observed.

The post Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance | Columnists first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1281) "
Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance |  Columnists

After living in Greensboro for 49 years up until last November, I was deeply struck by the story in Allen Johnson’s new column (June 7th) describing the abusive behavior of some drivers while walking in his neighborhood. Despite numerous incidents of violence and vicious racial slurs against blacks, Jews, Asians, and Hispanic Americans, I really […]

The post Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance | Columnists first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2467) "
Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance |  Columnists

After living in Greensboro for 49 years up until last November, I was deeply struck by the story in Allen Johnson’s new column (June 7th) describing the abusive behavior of some drivers while walking in his neighborhood. Despite numerous incidents of violence and vicious racial slurs against blacks, Jews, Asians, and Hispanic Americans, I really want to believe that there is a very small minority who behave so despicably. The fact is, however, that these marginalized groups can and will cause irreparable damage to a society that is so diverse in religion, ethnicity, national origin and skin color.

These incidents of bigotry and hatred contradict claims that America is a melting pot or a country where people have successfully assimilated as proud Americans. The guarantee of equal rights for all citizens through our constitution is seen as a farce in the eyes of the world. What right do we have to teach other countries about human rights and justice when we so blatantly fail our fellow citizens about tolerance and respect?

I find it ironic that intolerance of the presence or points of view of others is not limited to one race. There are people of all races, albeit in very small numbers, who participate in atrocities inflicted on people of other races. The resurgence of attacks on Asians and Jews is a classic example. Despite impressive advances made by the civil rights movement that began in the early 1960s, sporadic incidents of police brutality and excessive use of force are still observed.

The post Suresh Chandra: Pathetic Spectacle of Intolerance | Columnists first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624170213) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(113) "Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh’s historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina’s pioneers" ["link"]=> string(139) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/mount-hope-cemetery-raleighs-historic-black-cemetery-serves-as-a-june-greeting-to-north-carolinas-pioneers/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sun, 20 Jun 2021 05:32:45 +0000" ["category"]=> string(7) "Raleigh" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8632" ["description"]=> string(2014) "
Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh's historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina's pioneers

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – Shelley Winters feels it every time she visits those 33 acres south of downtown Raleigh: the burden of ancestral responsibility. “If we get out of here and look at the names and faces, you’ll see the people who literally built Raleigh,” Winters said. Many of the black men and women who […]

The post Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh's historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina's pioneers first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4580) "
Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh's historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina's pioneers

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – Shelley Winters feels it every time she visits those 33 acres south of downtown Raleigh: the burden of ancestral responsibility.

“If we get out of here and look at the names and faces, you’ll see the people who literally built Raleigh,” Winters said.

Many of the black men and women who lived in Mt. Hope Cemetery were born into bondage in the 19th century; freed from slavery through emancipation; pioneers in southeast Raleigh for generations to come.

“With Raleigh growing and changing so fast, this is an important, rich part of Raleigh’s history – American history,” Winters said. “And people (have to) remember history and remember people.”

Inspired by the protests of George Floyd, the local artist paints an ode on Raleigh’s Black Main Street

Mount Hope was built in 1872 and was one of the city’s first cemeteries for mostly African American people. His graves testify to the struggle and resilience of Black Raleigh after slavery.

“This is my great-great-grandfather, George Lane,” Winters said, pointing to a large sculptural headstone.

Her great-great-grandfather, George Lane, was Raleigh’s first black undertaker and an appointed major in the State Guard.

Dr. Manassa Pope is buried here. He was one of the first black doctors in North Carolina; Lucille Hunter, who was born a slave in Wilmington and taught in Raleigh public schools for 40 years; Clarence Lightner, who became the city’s first and only black mayor; And Reverend Henry Beard Delaney, the first black bishop in Episcopal Church. He was a lecturer at the University of Saint Augustine. His daughters Sadie and Bessie Delaney became national treasures themselves.

A glimpse into the black history treasure hiding in downtown Raleigh Ra

But among the luminaries there are hundreds of names that no one knows.

“But they’re just as fundamental to Raleigh as the names we know,” said Winters.

Earlier this week, President Joe Biden signed the law making June thenth a observed federal holiday. Winters nodded in agreement. But she thinks it was long overdue.

“This is a day of deep weight and deep power,” Biden said at a signing ceremony at the White House.

That June, Winters organized a tour of Mount Hope. It was free to anyone who wanted to find out more about who is buried here. It is a greeting to the ancestors’ sacrifices.

“To give dignity and respect to those who lived in a time in which they may not have received this,” said Winters.

Berg Hope Cemetery is open Monday through Friday, 7:30 am to 4:00 pm. The burial place is located at 1100 Fayetteville Street in Raleigh.

Copyright © 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

The post Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh's historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina's pioneers first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(2014) "
Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh's historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina's pioneers

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – Shelley Winters feels it every time she visits those 33 acres south of downtown Raleigh: the burden of ancestral responsibility. “If we get out of here and look at the names and faces, you’ll see the people who literally built Raleigh,” Winters said. Many of the black men and women who […]

The post Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh's historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina's pioneers first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(4580) "
Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh's historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina's pioneers

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – Shelley Winters feels it every time she visits those 33 acres south of downtown Raleigh: the burden of ancestral responsibility.

“If we get out of here and look at the names and faces, you’ll see the people who literally built Raleigh,” Winters said.

Many of the black men and women who lived in Mt. Hope Cemetery were born into bondage in the 19th century; freed from slavery through emancipation; pioneers in southeast Raleigh for generations to come.

“With Raleigh growing and changing so fast, this is an important, rich part of Raleigh’s history – American history,” Winters said. “And people (have to) remember history and remember people.”

Inspired by the protests of George Floyd, the local artist paints an ode on Raleigh’s Black Main Street

Mount Hope was built in 1872 and was one of the city’s first cemeteries for mostly African American people. His graves testify to the struggle and resilience of Black Raleigh after slavery.

“This is my great-great-grandfather, George Lane,” Winters said, pointing to a large sculptural headstone.

Her great-great-grandfather, George Lane, was Raleigh’s first black undertaker and an appointed major in the State Guard.

Dr. Manassa Pope is buried here. He was one of the first black doctors in North Carolina; Lucille Hunter, who was born a slave in Wilmington and taught in Raleigh public schools for 40 years; Clarence Lightner, who became the city’s first and only black mayor; And Reverend Henry Beard Delaney, the first black bishop in Episcopal Church. He was a lecturer at the University of Saint Augustine. His daughters Sadie and Bessie Delaney became national treasures themselves.

A glimpse into the black history treasure hiding in downtown Raleigh Ra

But among the luminaries there are hundreds of names that no one knows.

“But they’re just as fundamental to Raleigh as the names we know,” said Winters.

Earlier this week, President Joe Biden signed the law making June thenth a observed federal holiday. Winters nodded in agreement. But she thinks it was long overdue.

“This is a day of deep weight and deep power,” Biden said at a signing ceremony at the White House.

That June, Winters organized a tour of Mount Hope. It was free to anyone who wanted to find out more about who is buried here. It is a greeting to the ancestors’ sacrifices.

“To give dignity and respect to those who lived in a time in which they may not have received this,” said Winters.

Berg Hope Cemetery is open Monday through Friday, 7:30 am to 4:00 pm. The burial place is located at 1100 Fayetteville Street in Raleigh.

Copyright © 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

The post Mount Hope Cemetery: Raleigh's historic black cemetery serves as a June greeting to North Carolina's pioneers first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624167165) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(56) "EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh" ["link"]=> string(89) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/ems-workers-shot-dead-at-the-juneteenth-event-in-raleigh/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sun, 20 Jun 2021 04:27:34 +0000" ["category"]=> string(6) "Durham" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8629" ["description"]=> string(1788) "
EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – An EMS worker was shot dead at an event in Raleigh in June. It happened just before 7 p.m. in Roberts Park, which is on East Martin Street about a mile east of downtown Raleigh. The EMS crew was there, responding to a call about someone who had fallen and needed […]

The post EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2437) "
EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – An EMS worker was shot dead at an event in Raleigh in June.

It happened just before 7 p.m. in Roberts Park, which is on East Martin Street about a mile east of downtown Raleigh.

The EMS crew was there, responding to a call about someone who had fallen and needed help.

The rescue workers heard gunshots and took cover. One bullet hit the ambulance and the other hit one of the workers, according to the Wake County government communications bureau.

Both the person who fell before the shooting and the ambulance worker who were shot were taken to hospital.

The ambulance worker was treated in the hospital and released. His name was not published.

The person responsible for the shooting has not been identified.

The Raleigh Police Department asked anyone with information about the shooting to call 919-834-HELP.

Copyright © 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

The post EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1788) "
EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – An EMS worker was shot dead at an event in Raleigh in June. It happened just before 7 p.m. in Roberts Park, which is on East Martin Street about a mile east of downtown Raleigh. The EMS crew was there, responding to a call about someone who had fallen and needed […]

The post EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2437) "
EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh

RALEIGH, NC (WTVD) – An EMS worker was shot dead at an event in Raleigh in June.

It happened just before 7 p.m. in Roberts Park, which is on East Martin Street about a mile east of downtown Raleigh.

The EMS crew was there, responding to a call about someone who had fallen and needed help.

The rescue workers heard gunshots and took cover. One bullet hit the ambulance and the other hit one of the workers, according to the Wake County government communications bureau.

Both the person who fell before the shooting and the ambulance worker who were shot were taken to hospital.

The ambulance worker was treated in the hospital and released. His name was not published.

The person responsible for the shooting has not been identified.

The Raleigh Police Department asked anyone with information about the shooting to call 919-834-HELP.

Copyright © 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

The post EMS workers shot dead at the Juneteenth event in Raleigh first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624163254) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(110) "Thousands attend Winston-Salem’s Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, meals, art and history | Local news" ["link"]=> string(134) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/thousands-attend-winston-salems-juneteenth-festival-with-music-dance-meals-art-and-history-local-news/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sun, 20 Jun 2021 02:55:05 +0000" ["category"]=> string(13) "Winston-Salem" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8625" ["description"]=> string(1665) "
Thousands attend Winston-Salem's Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, food, art and history |  Local news

In September 1862, President Abraham Lincoln proposed emancipation as a measure of war to force the treacherous states to surrender and give them the opportunity to maintain slavery if they ended hostilities against the Union, said Anthony Parent, professor of history and American Ethnology at the WFU. When the southern states refused, Lincoln granted the […]

The post Thousands attend Winston-Salem's Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, meals, art and history | Local news first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3022) "
Thousands attend Winston-Salem's Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, food, art and history |  Local news

In September 1862, President Abraham Lincoln proposed emancipation as a measure of war to force the treacherous states to surrender and give them the opportunity to maintain slavery if they ended hostilities against the Union, said Anthony Parent, professor of history and American Ethnology at the WFU.

When the southern states refused, Lincoln granted the enslaved people emancipation as soon as the union lines reached those states, Parent said.

“He (Lincoln) has not emancipated the enslaved people in states loyal to the Union: Maryland, Missouri, Delaware or Kentucky,” Parent said. “Turning the war into a war of liberation opened the door to African American participation.

“Not only did four out of five men eligible to serve in the free states volunteer for the US Colored Troops, but the former enslaved made up the majority of the recruits,” Parent said. “More than 220,000 fought in the war to free their people.”

Other blacks helped the Union’s war effort by running to Union lines, Parent said. The Black Union forces were the first to liberate Richmond, the Confederation’s capital.

Because the liberation was through military action, it took the army until June 19, 1865 to free the enslaved people of Texas, “Parent said.

“The liberated people themselves chose June 19th as their holiday and marked June 10th by putting the date in a single word, reflecting the orality of their folk culture that had enabled them to endure enslavement and survive” said Parent. “They avoided both January 1, 1863, when the Emancipation Proclamation came into force, and April 31, 1865, when the 13th

The post Thousands attend Winston-Salem's Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, meals, art and history | Local news first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1665) "
Thousands attend Winston-Salem's Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, food, art and history |  Local news

In September 1862, President Abraham Lincoln proposed emancipation as a measure of war to force the treacherous states to surrender and give them the opportunity to maintain slavery if they ended hostilities against the Union, said Anthony Parent, professor of history and American Ethnology at the WFU. When the southern states refused, Lincoln granted the […]

The post Thousands attend Winston-Salem's Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, meals, art and history | Local news first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(3022) "
Thousands attend Winston-Salem's Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, food, art and history |  Local news

In September 1862, President Abraham Lincoln proposed emancipation as a measure of war to force the treacherous states to surrender and give them the opportunity to maintain slavery if they ended hostilities against the Union, said Anthony Parent, professor of history and American Ethnology at the WFU.

When the southern states refused, Lincoln granted the enslaved people emancipation as soon as the union lines reached those states, Parent said.

“He (Lincoln) has not emancipated the enslaved people in states loyal to the Union: Maryland, Missouri, Delaware or Kentucky,” Parent said. “Turning the war into a war of liberation opened the door to African American participation.

“Not only did four out of five men eligible to serve in the free states volunteer for the US Colored Troops, but the former enslaved made up the majority of the recruits,” Parent said. “More than 220,000 fought in the war to free their people.”

Other blacks helped the Union’s war effort by running to Union lines, Parent said. The Black Union forces were the first to liberate Richmond, the Confederation’s capital.

Because the liberation was through military action, it took the army until June 19, 1865 to free the enslaved people of Texas, “Parent said.

“The liberated people themselves chose June 19th as their holiday and marked June 10th by putting the date in a single word, reflecting the orality of their folk culture that had enabled them to endure enslavement and survive” said Parent. “They avoided both January 1, 1863, when the Emancipation Proclamation came into force, and April 31, 1865, when the 13th

The post Thousands attend Winston-Salem's Juneteenth Festival with music, dance, meals, art and history | Local news first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624157705) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(53) "Photographs: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 | gallery" ["link"]=> string(82) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/photographs-summer-solstice-festival-2021-gallery/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sun, 20 Jun 2021 02:22:28 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8621" ["description"]=> string(1503) "
Photos: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 |  gallery

The summer solstice festival returns. An eclectic collection of artists, makers, vendors, body artists and grocery vendors was on Saturday in both Lindley Park and across the bridge at Greensboro Arboretum. After being canceled due to the pandemic last year, the festival typically draws thousands of people, many in elaborate costumes, to celebrate the longest […]

The post Photographs: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 | gallery first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(1969) "
Photos: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 |  gallery

The summer solstice festival returns. An eclectic collection of artists, makers, vendors, body artists and grocery vendors was on Saturday in both Lindley Park and across the bridge at Greensboro Arboretum. After being canceled due to the pandemic last year, the festival typically draws thousands of people, many in elaborate costumes, to celebrate the longest day of the year, summer solstice, June 20th. Different cultures and religious traditions have different names for the summer solstice. In Northern Europe it is often referred to as midsummer. Wiccans and other neo-pagan groups called it Litha, while some Christian churches recognize the summer solstice as St. John’s Day to commemorate the birth of John the Baptist. To this day, the summer solstice is an important holiday for a wide variety of cultures.

The post Photographs: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 | gallery first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1503) "
Photos: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 |  gallery

The summer solstice festival returns. An eclectic collection of artists, makers, vendors, body artists and grocery vendors was on Saturday in both Lindley Park and across the bridge at Greensboro Arboretum. After being canceled due to the pandemic last year, the festival typically draws thousands of people, many in elaborate costumes, to celebrate the longest […]

The post Photographs: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 | gallery first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(1969) "
Photos: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 |  gallery

The summer solstice festival returns. An eclectic collection of artists, makers, vendors, body artists and grocery vendors was on Saturday in both Lindley Park and across the bridge at Greensboro Arboretum. After being canceled due to the pandemic last year, the festival typically draws thousands of people, many in elaborate costumes, to celebrate the longest day of the year, summer solstice, June 20th. Different cultures and religious traditions have different names for the summer solstice. In Northern Europe it is often referred to as midsummer. Wiccans and other neo-pagan groups called it Litha, while some Christian churches recognize the summer solstice as St. John’s Day to commemorate the birth of John the Baptist. To this day, the summer solstice is an important holiday for a wide variety of cultures.

The post Photographs: Summer Solstice Festival 2021 | gallery first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624155748) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(121) "Raleigh, NC – One useless, one injured after a car accident on I-440 – Raleigh Personal Injury Blog – June 19, 2021" ["link"]=> string(139) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/raleigh-nc-one-useless-one-injured-after-a-car-accident-on-i-440-raleigh-personal-injury-blog-june-19-2021/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 19 Jun 2021 22:31:47 +0000" ["category"]=> string(7) "Raleigh" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8617" ["description"]=> string(1556) "
Raleigh, NC - One Killed, One Hurt Following Car Accident on I-440

Raleigh, NC (June 19, 2021) – Raleigh police were at the site of a fatal accident on Thursday June 17th. The collision occurred around 4:30 a.m. on Interstate 440 near US 264. A male driver was reportedly killed in the collision. In the accident, a driver was seriously, but not fatally injured. The identity of […]

The post Raleigh, NC - One useless, one injured after a car accident on I-440 - Raleigh Personal Injury Blog - June 19, 2021 first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5778) "
Raleigh, NC - One Killed, One Hurt Following Car Accident on I-440

Raleigh, NC (June 19, 2021) – Raleigh police were at the site of a fatal accident on Thursday June 17th. The collision occurred around 4:30 a.m. on Interstate 440 near US 264.

A male driver was reportedly killed in the collision. In the accident, a driver was seriously, but not fatally injured. The identity of the victims has not yet been disclosed at the time. Police did not provide any information about the events that led to the crash, and there is no information on whether charges are likely to be brought. No other injuries were reported.

The crash resulted in I-440 being locked down for several hours while an investigation was ongoing. No further information was released at this point.

We would like to extend our condolences to all family members who were affected by this fatal car accident in Raleigh. We hope that the injured person can recover quickly and completely.

Car accidents in North Carolina

Unfortunately, fatal car accidents are reported daily across North Carolina. In 2019, nearly 1,500 people lost their lives in North Carolina car accidents. Many fatal accidents occur on highways such as Interstate 40. Due to the higher volume of traffic and the higher speed limits, serious accidents are more likely to occur on the motorway. When these factors are combined with negligent driving behavior, the risk of a serious or fatal accident increases.

If you lost a family member in a North Carolina car accident, our condolences are with you. We know that there is nothing more devastating or heartbreaking than experiencing the sudden loss of a loved one. This is especially true if your loved one was killed in an accident that was not their own fault. Despite the tragedy of this situation, you may have valuable rights. Under North Carolina law, the victim’s next of kin can file an unlawful death claim after the crash to recover certain types of harm.

Lawsuits for wrongful death in North Carolina must be filed within two years of the date of death. The victim’s personal representative may seek compensation for the payment of funeral and medical expenses, loss of the consortium, loss of wages, and more. Because of the complexity of these claims, they should only be handled by an experienced wrongful death attorney in North Carolina. Here at Burton Law Firm, we can assist you in your need. For more than eight years, Attorney Jason M. Burton has been proud to serve the Raleigh community and our clients following serious injury accidents

Our law firm is at your side with words and deeds and will answer your call at any time. We offer all potential and potential customers a free initial consultation and case assessment. We also handle most cases on a contingency fee basis, which means there are no fees unless we arrange recovery on your behalf. To schedule an appointment with a member of our team, please contact us using the link on our website or call us anytime at (833) 623-0042.

NoExtract: Burton Law Firm uses a variety of external sources in compiling these accident reports. These sources include news broadcasts, police reports, first hand reports, news reports, as well as additional external sources. As a result, the details of this accident have not been independently verified by our office or typists. If you find incorrect information about an accident that we have written about, please contact our law firm as soon as possible so that we can correct the information immediately. If you would prefer us to remove the story, contact us directly and we will endeavor to remove the story in a timely manner.

Disclaimer: Our team of personal injury attorneys at Burton Law Firm pride themselves on having been active members of our local business community for more than 8 years. We are constantly striving to improve the quality of life of our community members and to improve the general safety and wellbeing of all North Carolinians. We hope that by providing this information we will raise awareness about the dangers of driving and encourage drivers to exercise increased caution when driving. Our thoughts go out to anyone who may be affected by this incident. This post is not an advertisement for companies. None of the information in this post should be misunderstood as medical or legal advice. The photos in this post are not a representation of the actual scene of the accident.

The post Raleigh, NC - One useless, one injured after a car accident on I-440 - Raleigh Personal Injury Blog - June 19, 2021 first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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Raleigh, NC - One Killed, One Hurt Following Car Accident on I-440

Raleigh, NC (June 19, 2021) – Raleigh police were at the site of a fatal accident on Thursday June 17th. The collision occurred around 4:30 a.m. on Interstate 440 near US 264. A male driver was reportedly killed in the collision. In the accident, a driver was seriously, but not fatally injured. The identity of […]

The post Raleigh, NC - One useless, one injured after a car accident on I-440 - Raleigh Personal Injury Blog - June 19, 2021 first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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Raleigh, NC - One Killed, One Hurt Following Car Accident on I-440

Raleigh, NC (June 19, 2021) – Raleigh police were at the site of a fatal accident on Thursday June 17th. The collision occurred around 4:30 a.m. on Interstate 440 near US 264.

A male driver was reportedly killed in the collision. In the accident, a driver was seriously, but not fatally injured. The identity of the victims has not yet been disclosed at the time. Police did not provide any information about the events that led to the crash, and there is no information on whether charges are likely to be brought. No other injuries were reported.

The crash resulted in I-440 being locked down for several hours while an investigation was ongoing. No further information was released at this point.

We would like to extend our condolences to all family members who were affected by this fatal car accident in Raleigh. We hope that the injured person can recover quickly and completely.

Car accidents in North Carolina

Unfortunately, fatal car accidents are reported daily across North Carolina. In 2019, nearly 1,500 people lost their lives in North Carolina car accidents. Many fatal accidents occur on highways such as Interstate 40. Due to the higher volume of traffic and the higher speed limits, serious accidents are more likely to occur on the motorway. When these factors are combined with negligent driving behavior, the risk of a serious or fatal accident increases.

If you lost a family member in a North Carolina car accident, our condolences are with you. We know that there is nothing more devastating or heartbreaking than experiencing the sudden loss of a loved one. This is especially true if your loved one was killed in an accident that was not their own fault. Despite the tragedy of this situation, you may have valuable rights. Under North Carolina law, the victim’s next of kin can file an unlawful death claim after the crash to recover certain types of harm.

Lawsuits for wrongful death in North Carolina must be filed within two years of the date of death. The victim’s personal representative may seek compensation for the payment of funeral and medical expenses, loss of the consortium, loss of wages, and more. Because of the complexity of these claims, they should only be handled by an experienced wrongful death attorney in North Carolina. Here at Burton Law Firm, we can assist you in your need. For more than eight years, Attorney Jason M. Burton has been proud to serve the Raleigh community and our clients following serious injury accidents

Our law firm is at your side with words and deeds and will answer your call at any time. We offer all potential and potential customers a free initial consultation and case assessment. We also handle most cases on a contingency fee basis, which means there are no fees unless we arrange recovery on your behalf. To schedule an appointment with a member of our team, please contact us using the link on our website or call us anytime at (833) 623-0042.

NoExtract: Burton Law Firm uses a variety of external sources in compiling these accident reports. These sources include news broadcasts, police reports, first hand reports, news reports, as well as additional external sources. As a result, the details of this accident have not been independently verified by our office or typists. If you find incorrect information about an accident that we have written about, please contact our law firm as soon as possible so that we can correct the information immediately. If you would prefer us to remove the story, contact us directly and we will endeavor to remove the story in a timely manner.

Disclaimer: Our team of personal injury attorneys at Burton Law Firm pride themselves on having been active members of our local business community for more than 8 years. We are constantly striving to improve the quality of life of our community members and to improve the general safety and wellbeing of all North Carolinians. We hope that by providing this information we will raise awareness about the dangers of driving and encourage drivers to exercise increased caution when driving. Our thoughts go out to anyone who may be affected by this incident. This post is not an advertisement for companies. None of the information in this post should be misunderstood as medical or legal advice. The photos in this post are not a representation of the actual scene of the accident.

The post Raleigh, NC - One useless, one injured after a car accident on I-440 - Raleigh Personal Injury Blog - June 19, 2021 first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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EMF partners with Greensboro Opera for special concert on July 14th |  music

GREENSBORO – The Eastern Music Festival is again working with Greensboro Opera this summer for a special program. The July 14 concert is a sneak peek of the upcoming Porgy & Bess production at Greensboro Opera and will also feature classic song favorites, EMF said in a press release on Saturday. Every summer EMF brings […]

The post EMF partners with Greensboro Opera for special concert on July 14th | music first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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EMF partners with Greensboro Opera for special concert on July 14th |  music

GREENSBORO – The Eastern Music Festival is again working with Greensboro Opera this summer for a special program.

The July 14 concert is a sneak peek of the upcoming Porgy & Bess production at Greensboro Opera and will also feature classic song favorites, EMF said in a press release on Saturday.

Every summer EMF brings hundreds of young music students from around the world to Guilford College to study classical music with EMF’s renowned faculty and guest artists. This year EMF expects more than 35 live performances from budding and professional musicians during the festival, which runs from June 26th to July 31st.

The concert on July 14th is entitled Greensboro Opera and EMF Present: Summertime and the Livin ‘is EASIER!

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Your subscription enables our reporting.

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GREENSBORO – The Eastern Music Festival will return to Guilford College this summer after the COVID-19 pandemic canceled its 2020 personal season.

Featured artists include soprano Angela Renée Simpson, tenor Robert Anthony Mack and baritone Richard Hodges, as well as EMF pianists Ben Blozan and Awadagin Pratt. It is produced by David Holley, Artistic Director of Greensboro Opera.

The 8pm concert will take place at Temple Emanuel, 1129 Jefferson Road, Greensboro. Seats are limited to 125. Masks for spectators are optional.

Tickets are $ 30 and can be purchased through www.eventbrite.com.

The post EMF partners with Greensboro Opera for special concert on July 14th | music first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1678) "
EMF partners with Greensboro Opera for special concert on July 14th |  music

GREENSBORO – The Eastern Music Festival is again working with Greensboro Opera this summer for a special program. The July 14 concert is a sneak peek of the upcoming Porgy & Bess production at Greensboro Opera and will also feature classic song favorites, EMF said in a press release on Saturday. Every summer EMF brings […]

The post EMF partners with Greensboro Opera for special concert on July 14th | music first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(2942) "
EMF partners with Greensboro Opera for special concert on July 14th |  music

GREENSBORO – The Eastern Music Festival is again working with Greensboro Opera this summer for a special program.

The July 14 concert is a sneak peek of the upcoming Porgy & Bess production at Greensboro Opera and will also feature classic song favorites, EMF said in a press release on Saturday.

Every summer EMF brings hundreds of young music students from around the world to Guilford College to study classical music with EMF’s renowned faculty and guest artists. This year EMF expects more than 35 live performances from budding and professional musicians during the festival, which runs from June 26th to July 31st.

The concert on July 14th is entitled Greensboro Opera and EMF Present: Summertime and the Livin ‘is EASIER!

Support local journalism

Your subscription enables our reporting.

{{featured_button_text}}

GREENSBORO – The Eastern Music Festival will return to Guilford College this summer after the COVID-19 pandemic canceled its 2020 personal season.

Featured artists include soprano Angela Renée Simpson, tenor Robert Anthony Mack and baritone Richard Hodges, as well as EMF pianists Ben Blozan and Awadagin Pratt. It is produced by David Holley, Artistic Director of Greensboro Opera.

The 8pm concert will take place at Temple Emanuel, 1129 Jefferson Road, Greensboro. Seats are limited to 125. Masks for spectators are optional.

Tickets are $ 30 and can be purchased through www.eventbrite.com.

The post EMF partners with Greensboro Opera for special concert on July 14th | music first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624141233) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(53) "Editorial: A bank investment that paid off | opinion" ["link"]=> string(82) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/editorial-a-bank-investment-that-paid-off-opinion/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 19 Jun 2021 19:26:29 +0000" ["category"]=> string(6) "Durham" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8611" ["description"]=> string(1546) "
Editorial: A bank investment that paid off |  opinion

The act of governments to provide economic incentives to attract new businesses in the city is always a tricky business. Everyone supports the jobs, the extra tax base, the new people in town, and other perks that come with being a blue chip business. Still, offering cash, land, property tax breaks, or other incentives may […]

The post Editorial: A bank investment that paid off | opinion first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5279) "
Editorial: A bank investment that paid off |  opinion

The act of governments to provide economic incentives to attract new businesses in the city is always a tricky business.

Everyone supports the jobs, the extra tax base, the new people in town, and other perks that come with being a blue chip business.

Still, offering cash, land, property tax breaks, or other incentives may seem inappropriate if the customer is a highly profitable company that is perfectly capable of going its own way.

While some local communities “buy into” the strategy, others do not or are reluctant to do so. Moore County belongs to this latter group.

Eight years ago, the Board of Commissioners and City Council of Southern Pines signed a deal to get First Bank to relocate their headquarters from Troy to downtown Southern Pines. The Incentive Deal: Moore County agreed to pay $ 15,000 per year for 10 years, while Southern Pines provided $ 12,000 per year for 10 years to cover moving expenses. Total Public Investment: $ 270,000.

Nick Picerno, then chairman of the Board of Commissioners, was the only one to vote against the deal, saying he was philosophically against the whole concept of incentives. “I don’t like it when governments of all sizes have to buy companies with taxpayers’ money.”

Still, he said at the time: “I fully support the arrival of First Bank. I think it will prove to be very lucrative. “

He couldn’t have been more correct on this last point.

The deal that Moore County and Southern Pines made was a winner from the start. Instead of demolishing land and building a new building, the bank instead invested $ 2.65 million in an existing downtown office building on the corner of South Broad Street and Massachusetts Avenue to ensure that a large number of well-paid professionals could run the restaurants downtown can patronize downtown and shops – and the city wouldn’t have a large, vacant building on the edge of its important business district.

At the time Troy moved here, First Bancorp, the parent company, had total assets of just over $ 3.2 billion and nearly 100 stores in the Carolinas and Virginia.

With the purchase of Dunn-based Select Bancorp earlier this month, First Bank will soon have more than $ 9 billion in total assets and 124 branches. It is the fourth largest bank based in North Carolina, after Bank of America, Truist – both based in Charlotte – and First Citizens Bank based in Raleigh. From its base in Southern Pines, the company now employs more than 1,000 full-time employees and serves 300,000 banking customers. And every time a profit announcement or other press release is published regarding First Bancorp it will include the words “headquartered in Southern Pines”.

Incentive agreements are never just about the profitability of the business. Communities spend to recruit companies based on what a particular company says about that community. North Carolina is spending more than $ 1 billion on new Apple offices in Research Triangle Park, in part because of the “halo effect” of linking such a massive global brand to the state.

In the case of First Bank, however, the company has provided us with so much more than just a warm glow. Its employees are active volunteers and participants in civil life, from the Chamber of Commerce to non-profit bodies. The bank regularly promotes and supports non-profit and local projects, from the Public Education Foundation to the Sunrise Theater’s permanent outdoor pavilion that bears his name.

Nobody likes to spend money on companies that can stand on their own two feet. But occasionally, there are opportunities to invest in a business location in the city that, at the end of the day, offers so much more to a community.

Eight years ago at First Bank that was perhaps even more difficult to see. But time has proven that Moore County and Southern Pines actually made a small investment in a very lucrative cause.

The post Editorial: A bank investment that paid off | opinion first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1546) "
Editorial: A bank investment that paid off |  opinion

The act of governments to provide economic incentives to attract new businesses in the city is always a tricky business. Everyone supports the jobs, the extra tax base, the new people in town, and other perks that come with being a blue chip business. Still, offering cash, land, property tax breaks, or other incentives may […]

The post Editorial: A bank investment that paid off | opinion first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(5279) "
Editorial: A bank investment that paid off |  opinion

The act of governments to provide economic incentives to attract new businesses in the city is always a tricky business.

Everyone supports the jobs, the extra tax base, the new people in town, and other perks that come with being a blue chip business.

Still, offering cash, land, property tax breaks, or other incentives may seem inappropriate if the customer is a highly profitable company that is perfectly capable of going its own way.

While some local communities “buy into” the strategy, others do not or are reluctant to do so. Moore County belongs to this latter group.

Eight years ago, the Board of Commissioners and City Council of Southern Pines signed a deal to get First Bank to relocate their headquarters from Troy to downtown Southern Pines. The Incentive Deal: Moore County agreed to pay $ 15,000 per year for 10 years, while Southern Pines provided $ 12,000 per year for 10 years to cover moving expenses. Total Public Investment: $ 270,000.

Nick Picerno, then chairman of the Board of Commissioners, was the only one to vote against the deal, saying he was philosophically against the whole concept of incentives. “I don’t like it when governments of all sizes have to buy companies with taxpayers’ money.”

Still, he said at the time: “I fully support the arrival of First Bank. I think it will prove to be very lucrative. “

He couldn’t have been more correct on this last point.

The deal that Moore County and Southern Pines made was a winner from the start. Instead of demolishing land and building a new building, the bank instead invested $ 2.65 million in an existing downtown office building on the corner of South Broad Street and Massachusetts Avenue to ensure that a large number of well-paid professionals could run the restaurants downtown can patronize downtown and shops – and the city wouldn’t have a large, vacant building on the edge of its important business district.

At the time Troy moved here, First Bancorp, the parent company, had total assets of just over $ 3.2 billion and nearly 100 stores in the Carolinas and Virginia.

With the purchase of Dunn-based Select Bancorp earlier this month, First Bank will soon have more than $ 9 billion in total assets and 124 branches. It is the fourth largest bank based in North Carolina, after Bank of America, Truist – both based in Charlotte – and First Citizens Bank based in Raleigh. From its base in Southern Pines, the company now employs more than 1,000 full-time employees and serves 300,000 banking customers. And every time a profit announcement or other press release is published regarding First Bancorp it will include the words “headquartered in Southern Pines”.

Incentive agreements are never just about the profitability of the business. Communities spend to recruit companies based on what a particular company says about that community. North Carolina is spending more than $ 1 billion on new Apple offices in Research Triangle Park, in part because of the “halo effect” of linking such a massive global brand to the state.

In the case of First Bank, however, the company has provided us with so much more than just a warm glow. Its employees are active volunteers and participants in civil life, from the Chamber of Commerce to non-profit bodies. The bank regularly promotes and supports non-profit and local projects, from the Public Education Foundation to the Sunrise Theater’s permanent outdoor pavilion that bears his name.

Nobody likes to spend money on companies that can stand on their own two feet. But occasionally, there are opportunities to invest in a business location in the city that, at the end of the day, offers so much more to a community.

Eight years ago at First Bank that was perhaps even more difficult to see. But time has proven that Moore County and Southern Pines actually made a small investment in a very lucrative cause.

The post Editorial: A bank investment that paid off | opinion first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1624130789) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(82) "Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th | education" ["link"]=> string(112) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/guilford-school-board-meetings-will-reopen-to-the-public-on-july-13th-education/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Bill Moran" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 19 Jun 2021 18:19:46 +0000" ["category"]=> string(10) "Greensboro" ["guid"]=> string(39) "https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8608" ["description"]=> string(1568) "
Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th |  education

Employee reports GREENSBORO – The public will again be able to attend meetings of the Guilford County Board of Education in person starting next month, with some restrictions. The change will take effect at the next scheduled board meeting on July 13, Guilford County Schools said in a press release on Thursday. Since the beginning […]

The post Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th | education first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th |  education



Employee reports

GREENSBORO – The public will again be able to attend meetings of the Guilford County Board of Education in person starting next month, with some restrictions.

The change will take effect at the next scheduled board meeting on July 13, Guilford County Schools said in a press release on Thursday. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the public has not been able to attend board meetings in person.

Seating capacity is limited to 15 people to allow 3 feet of space between seats. Face covering and health exams are required. According to the notification, the limit values ​​and requirements are based on the current health guidelines for public schools.

Support local journalism

Your subscription enables our reporting.

{{featured_button_text}}

The district plans to use a lottery system to determine who will occupy those 15 seats.

In addition, there will be a 30-minute personal public comment phase. Speakers are limited to three minutes each, enter the meeting room one at a time, and leave as soon as they are finished.

In the midst of yelling protesters outside, school officials are discussing the possible reopening of board meetings

Those wishing to speak at a meeting should call 336-370-8100 by noon of the meeting. All requests are date and time stamped and speakers will be selected based on requests received, the district said.

People can also send comments via email. Comments are also posted with the board materials on the district website.

The post Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th | education first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" } ["summary"]=> string(1568) "
Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th |  education

Employee reports GREENSBORO – The public will again be able to attend meetings of the Guilford County Board of Education in person starting next month, with some restrictions. The change will take effect at the next scheduled board meeting on July 13, Guilford County Schools said in a press release on Thursday. Since the beginning […]

The post Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th | education first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

" ["atom_content"]=> string(3324) "
Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th |  education



Employee reports

GREENSBORO – The public will again be able to attend meetings of the Guilford County Board of Education in person starting next month, with some restrictions.

The change will take effect at the next scheduled board meeting on July 13, Guilford County Schools said in a press release on Thursday. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, the public has not been able to attend board meetings in person.

Seating capacity is limited to 15 people to allow 3 feet of space between seats. Face covering and health exams are required. According to the notification, the limit values ​​and requirements are based on the current health guidelines for public schools.

Support local journalism

Your subscription enables our reporting.

{{featured_button_text}}

The district plans to use a lottery system to determine who will occupy those 15 seats.

In addition, there will be a 30-minute personal public comment phase. Speakers are limited to three minutes each, enter the meeting room one at a time, and leave as soon as they are finished.

In the midst of yelling protesters outside, school officials are discussing the possible reopening of board meetings

Those wishing to speak at a meeting should call 336-370-8100 by noon of the meeting. All requests are date and time stamped and speakers will be selected based on requests received, the district said.

People can also send comments via email. Comments are also posted with the board materials on the district website.

The post Guilford School Board meetings will reopen to the public on July 13th | education first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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