OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.
Notice: MagpieRSS [debug] Returning STALE object for http://dentistnewsnetwork.com/feed in /data/web/master/cms/scripts/rss/magpie/rss_fetch.inc on line 243

Example Output

Channel: dentistnewsnetwork

RSS URL:

Parsed Results (var_dump'ed)

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  ["parser"]=>
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    [0]=>
    array(11) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(101) "Andmesh Thankful the Song Suddenly Becomes the Theme Song for FilmTV Premiere GTV : Okezone Celebrity"
      ["link"]=>
      string(152) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/celebrity/2021/09/04/andmesh-thankful-the-song-suddenly-becomes-the-theme-song-for-filmtv-premiere-gtv-okezone-celebrity/"
      ["dc"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["creator"]=>
        string(16) "Sandy Richardson"
      }
      ["pubdate"]=>
      string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 14:22:52 +0000"
      ["category"]=>
      string(75) "CelebrityAndmeshcelebrityFilmTVGTVOkezonepremièreSongsuddenlyThankfulTheme"
      ["guid"]=>
      string(152) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/celebrity/2021/09/04/andmesh-thankful-the-song-suddenly-becomes-the-theme-song-for-filmtv-premiere-gtv-okezone-celebrity/"
      ["description"]=>
      string(101) "JAKARTA – “..and all the beautiful stories. About me and him.” The lyric fragment of..."
      ["content"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["encoded"]=>
        string(3378) "

JAKARTA – “..and all the beautiful stories. About me and him.” The lyric fragment of the song Tiba – Tiba by a talented young Indonesian singer, Andmesh Kamaleng, is certainly very suitable to be used as the theme song for FilmTV Premiere.

Airing every Saturday and Sunday at 16.00 WIB, FilmTV Premiere always presents a love story that is uwu and makes baper. The heart feels so heavy and uwuu every song suddenly plays along with the romantic scenes on FilmTV Premiere. At the same time, Andmesh also felt grateful and happy because his song Tiba – Tiba became the theme song of the FilmTV Premiere. “.. even more surprised because this is the first time in GTV right.

Also Read:

Andmesh Kamaleng and 3 Composers Close the Red and White Virtual Concert

Can Without You The Latest Work from Andmesh Kamaleng

So, thank you to GTV for giving me the opportunity and supporting my songs,” Andmesh said enthusiastically (03/09/21). “Watch FilmTV Premiere every Saturday and Sunday at 16.00 WIB only on GTV,” he continued.

Supported by young stars such as James Thomas, Gesya Shandy, Cut Ara, Alzi Markers, Joshua Otay, Fandy Christian, Marsha Aruan, Rayn Wijaya to Dhea Annisa. FilmTV Premiere will definitely be the best time for you to pamper and entertain yourself on weekends. Acting as Jason in Ikatan Cinta and acting directly with Arya Saloka & Amanda Manopo, the quality of James Thomas’ acting is able to make anyone who watches drown in feelings. Two handsome actors Joshua Otay and Fandy Christian have produced a long list of quality works with dozens of entertaining FTV titles and soap operas, Alzi Marker with a handsome face similar to Fero Walandouw whose acting skills have been proven in national wide screen films,

Cut Syahra Imelda Putri or who is familiarly called Cut Ara, is a sweet celebrity of Acehnese descent who also has skills in the field of acting.

Once a model for a video clip, her emotions and expressions are guaranteed to make our hearts melt when watching FilmTV Premiere on GTV. Besides Cut Ara, Dhea Annisa, previously known as Dhea Imut, will also enliven the ranks of young stars in FilmTV Premiere. Of course, we have many sweet memories given by this talented young actress during her career in the Indonesian entertainment world. Marsha Aruan, a charming former actress from El Rumi and Gesya Shandy, a sweet actress who has often starred in FTV and feature films will also show their best acting. Get ready, Gesya’s acting, who turns out to be a traveling lover, will make you instantly fall in love.

Are you ready to smile yourself with a love story that is so sweet? Watch the love story that touches the heart on FilmTV Premier every Saturday and Sunday at 16.00 WIB only on GTV. While watching FilmTV Premiere, let’s also join the #poseuwu giveaway so you have the opportunity to get free credit from GTV. Follow the TikTok account and Instagram @officialgtvid to get complete info, the latest updates and interesting content. FilmTV Premiere programs can also be watched on the RCTI+ application or on www.rctiplus.com

(aln)

" } ["summary"]=> string(101) "JAKARTA – “..and all the beautiful stories. About me and him.” The lyric fragment of..." ["atom_content"]=> string(3378) "

JAKARTA – “..and all the beautiful stories. About me and him.” The lyric fragment of the song Tiba – Tiba by a talented young Indonesian singer, Andmesh Kamaleng, is certainly very suitable to be used as the theme song for FilmTV Premiere.

Airing every Saturday and Sunday at 16.00 WIB, FilmTV Premiere always presents a love story that is uwu and makes baper. The heart feels so heavy and uwuu every song suddenly plays along with the romantic scenes on FilmTV Premiere. At the same time, Andmesh also felt grateful and happy because his song Tiba – Tiba became the theme song of the FilmTV Premiere. “.. even more surprised because this is the first time in GTV right.

Also Read:

Andmesh Kamaleng and 3 Composers Close the Red and White Virtual Concert

Can Without You The Latest Work from Andmesh Kamaleng

So, thank you to GTV for giving me the opportunity and supporting my songs,” Andmesh said enthusiastically (03/09/21). “Watch FilmTV Premiere every Saturday and Sunday at 16.00 WIB only on GTV,” he continued.

Supported by young stars such as James Thomas, Gesya Shandy, Cut Ara, Alzi Markers, Joshua Otay, Fandy Christian, Marsha Aruan, Rayn Wijaya to Dhea Annisa. FilmTV Premiere will definitely be the best time for you to pamper and entertain yourself on weekends. Acting as Jason in Ikatan Cinta and acting directly with Arya Saloka & Amanda Manopo, the quality of James Thomas’ acting is able to make anyone who watches drown in feelings. Two handsome actors Joshua Otay and Fandy Christian have produced a long list of quality works with dozens of entertaining FTV titles and soap operas, Alzi Marker with a handsome face similar to Fero Walandouw whose acting skills have been proven in national wide screen films,

Cut Syahra Imelda Putri or who is familiarly called Cut Ara, is a sweet celebrity of Acehnese descent who also has skills in the field of acting.

Once a model for a video clip, her emotions and expressions are guaranteed to make our hearts melt when watching FilmTV Premiere on GTV. Besides Cut Ara, Dhea Annisa, previously known as Dhea Imut, will also enliven the ranks of young stars in FilmTV Premiere. Of course, we have many sweet memories given by this talented young actress during her career in the Indonesian entertainment world. Marsha Aruan, a charming former actress from El Rumi and Gesya Shandy, a sweet actress who has often starred in FTV and feature films will also show their best acting. Get ready, Gesya’s acting, who turns out to be a traveling lover, will make you instantly fall in love.

Are you ready to smile yourself with a love story that is so sweet? Watch the love story that touches the heart on FilmTV Premier every Saturday and Sunday at 16.00 WIB only on GTV. While watching FilmTV Premiere, let’s also join the #poseuwu giveaway so you have the opportunity to get free credit from GTV. Follow the TikTok account and Instagram @officialgtvid to get complete info, the latest updates and interesting content. FilmTV Premiere programs can also be watched on the RCTI+ application or on www.rctiplus.com

(aln)

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630765372) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(103) "Minor cell population plays major role in triggering a silent subset of inherited MDS cases – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(162) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/minor-cell-population-plays-major-role-in-triggering-a-silent-subset-of-inherited-mds-cases-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 13:26:35 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(162) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/minor-cell-population-plays-major-role-in-triggering-a-silent-subset-of-inherited-mds-cases-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(112) "Journal Reference: Timothy M. Chlon, Emily Stepanchick, Courtney E. Hershberger, Noah J. Daniels, Kathleen M...." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6497) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Timothy M. Chlon, Emily Stepanchick, Courtney E. Hershberger, Noah J. Daniels, Kathleen M. Hueneman, Ashley Kuenzi Davis, Kwangmin Choi, Yi Zheng, Carmelo Gurnari, Torsten Haferlach, Richard A. Padgett, Jaroslaw P. Maciejewski, Daniel T. Starczynowski. Germline DDX41 mutations cause ineffective hematopoiesis and myelodysplasia. Cell Stem Cell, 2021; DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2021.08.004

In most cases, MDS is caused by mutations that arise in blood stem cells during a person’s life. These patients experience anemia, fatigue, and other complications, with a typical age of MDS diagnosis at 70 years and beyond. However, about 2% to 5% of people with MDS are born with mutations that predispose them to a form of MDS but even they do not experience symptoms until their 60s.

In 2016, other scientists documented that people with this inherited form of adult MDS share mutations in the DDX41 gene, but it had not been clear what role the mutations played. Now, a study led by experts at Cincinnati Children’s Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, published Sept. 1, 2021, in Cell Stem Cell explains its significance.

Their discovery was based on extensive work to develop a more accurate mouse model of human MDS caused by mutations in DDX41. An important facet of the disease seems to depend on cells that acquire an additional mutation in their other copy of the DDX41 gene, creating blood stem cells with two DDX41 mutations.

The team reasoned that these cells, which are relatively rare in the patient’s bone marrow, could indirectly affect the rest of the bone marrow and trigger abnormal blood production. In this way, this minor cell population could become a driver of MDS. Their findings suggest that targeting this minor cell population could lead to a treatment to prevent some cases of MDS.

“Basically, these rare cells help create a polluted bone marrow environment that in turn allows other stem cells with MDS-related gene mutations to thrive,” says Daniel Starczynowski, PhD, senior author of the study. “Without the presence of these trigger cells, the bone marrow might go on making blood cells normally as it had throughout the patient’s life.”

While this study focuses on MDS, similar types of crosstalk between cells with different combinations of mutations may play a role in other diseases.

“To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that inherited or de novo forms of MDS can be mediated by a disease-modifying minor clone in the bone marrow,” Starczynowski says.

What is MDS?

Myelodysplastic syndromes include a group of disorders that damage bone marrow function. About 75% of cases occur in people over age 60, but the condition also affects children and young adults. About one in three cases of MDS progresses to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to the MDS Foundation.

Sometimes MDS occurs as a side effect of radiation or chemotherapies for cancer. Some cases might be connected to toxic environmental exposures or to rare inherited diseases like Fanconi anemia. However, in most cases, the cause of MDS remains unknown.

Advanced cases of MDS require bone marrow transplantation. The average survival rate without a bone marrow transplant is about six years, but some patients can die within months from rapid bone marrow failure.

Detecting a silent trigger

Starczynowski and his colleagues have been studying MDS for years. After learning from other studies in the field that an inherited mutation in the DDX41 gene had been associated with MDS, the team set out to develop the mouse model in hopes of understanding more about the gene mutation.

“The cells with this additional DDX41 mutation do not comprise a large portion of the bone marrow. In fact, it’s hard to get cells with that combination of mutations to grow at all,” says Tim Chlon, PhD, first author on the study. “Once we realized that the cells were rare in the patient bone marrow, we thought that crosstalk occurring between these cells and the other cells in the bone marrow might play a role in disease onset.”

The mouse experiments reveal that blood stem cells with mutations in both copies of the DDX41 gene have defective machinery (called ribosomes) for making new proteins. This prevents the stem cells from multiplying and forming normal amounts of new blood cells. Since these cells do not multiply efficiently, they do not cause bone marrow failure by themselves, but they influence the other cells in the bone marrow and contribute to ineffective blood cell production.

This process may help explain why this subset of people with MDS can feel totally normal into late adulthood before the condition suddenly sets in.

Next Steps

The research team plans further studies to determine whether targeting cells with the minor clonal DDX41 mutation will change the course of MDS in mouse models, which if successful, could lead to potential human drug development.

The findings may also serve as a springboard for other research to look for similar crosstalk between potentially overlooked minor cell populations and their more abundant henchmen.

Minor cell population plays major role in triggering a silent subset of inherited MDS cases

" } ["summary"]=> string(112) "Journal Reference: Timothy M. Chlon, Emily Stepanchick, Courtney E. Hershberger, Noah J. Daniels, Kathleen M...." ["atom_content"]=> string(6497) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Timothy M. Chlon, Emily Stepanchick, Courtney E. Hershberger, Noah J. Daniels, Kathleen M. Hueneman, Ashley Kuenzi Davis, Kwangmin Choi, Yi Zheng, Carmelo Gurnari, Torsten Haferlach, Richard A. Padgett, Jaroslaw P. Maciejewski, Daniel T. Starczynowski. Germline DDX41 mutations cause ineffective hematopoiesis and myelodysplasia. Cell Stem Cell, 2021; DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2021.08.004

In most cases, MDS is caused by mutations that arise in blood stem cells during a person’s life. These patients experience anemia, fatigue, and other complications, with a typical age of MDS diagnosis at 70 years and beyond. However, about 2% to 5% of people with MDS are born with mutations that predispose them to a form of MDS but even they do not experience symptoms until their 60s.

In 2016, other scientists documented that people with this inherited form of adult MDS share mutations in the DDX41 gene, but it had not been clear what role the mutations played. Now, a study led by experts at Cincinnati Children’s Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, published Sept. 1, 2021, in Cell Stem Cell explains its significance.

Their discovery was based on extensive work to develop a more accurate mouse model of human MDS caused by mutations in DDX41. An important facet of the disease seems to depend on cells that acquire an additional mutation in their other copy of the DDX41 gene, creating blood stem cells with two DDX41 mutations.

The team reasoned that these cells, which are relatively rare in the patient’s bone marrow, could indirectly affect the rest of the bone marrow and trigger abnormal blood production. In this way, this minor cell population could become a driver of MDS. Their findings suggest that targeting this minor cell population could lead to a treatment to prevent some cases of MDS.

“Basically, these rare cells help create a polluted bone marrow environment that in turn allows other stem cells with MDS-related gene mutations to thrive,” says Daniel Starczynowski, PhD, senior author of the study. “Without the presence of these trigger cells, the bone marrow might go on making blood cells normally as it had throughout the patient’s life.”

While this study focuses on MDS, similar types of crosstalk between cells with different combinations of mutations may play a role in other diseases.

“To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that inherited or de novo forms of MDS can be mediated by a disease-modifying minor clone in the bone marrow,” Starczynowski says.

What is MDS?

Myelodysplastic syndromes include a group of disorders that damage bone marrow function. About 75% of cases occur in people over age 60, but the condition also affects children and young adults. About one in three cases of MDS progresses to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to the MDS Foundation.

Sometimes MDS occurs as a side effect of radiation or chemotherapies for cancer. Some cases might be connected to toxic environmental exposures or to rare inherited diseases like Fanconi anemia. However, in most cases, the cause of MDS remains unknown.

Advanced cases of MDS require bone marrow transplantation. The average survival rate without a bone marrow transplant is about six years, but some patients can die within months from rapid bone marrow failure.

Detecting a silent trigger

Starczynowski and his colleagues have been studying MDS for years. After learning from other studies in the field that an inherited mutation in the DDX41 gene had been associated with MDS, the team set out to develop the mouse model in hopes of understanding more about the gene mutation.

“The cells with this additional DDX41 mutation do not comprise a large portion of the bone marrow. In fact, it’s hard to get cells with that combination of mutations to grow at all,” says Tim Chlon, PhD, first author on the study. “Once we realized that the cells were rare in the patient bone marrow, we thought that crosstalk occurring between these cells and the other cells in the bone marrow might play a role in disease onset.”

The mouse experiments reveal that blood stem cells with mutations in both copies of the DDX41 gene have defective machinery (called ribosomes) for making new proteins. This prevents the stem cells from multiplying and forming normal amounts of new blood cells. Since these cells do not multiply efficiently, they do not cause bone marrow failure by themselves, but they influence the other cells in the bone marrow and contribute to ineffective blood cell production.

This process may help explain why this subset of people with MDS can feel totally normal into late adulthood before the condition suddenly sets in.

Next Steps

The research team plans further studies to determine whether targeting cells with the minor clonal DDX41 mutation will change the course of MDS in mouse models, which if successful, could lead to potential human drug development.

The findings may also serve as a springboard for other research to look for similar crosstalk between potentially overlooked minor cell populations and their more abundant henchmen.

Minor cell population plays major role in triggering a silent subset of inherited MDS cases

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630761995) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(81) "Dhena Devanka Sues Divorce Jonathan Frizzy for Third Person? : Okezone Celebrity" ["link"]=> string(130) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/celebrity/2021/09/04/dhena-devanka-sues-divorce-jonathan-frizzy-for-third-person-okezone-celebrity/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(16) "Sandy Richardson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 13:20:47 +0000" ["category"]=> string(68) "CelebritycelebrityDevankaDhenaDivorceFrizzyJonathanOkezonePersonsues" ["guid"]=> string(130) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/celebrity/2021/09/04/dhena-devanka-sues-divorce-jonathan-frizzy-for-third-person-okezone-celebrity/" ["description"]=> string(102) "JAKARTA – Dhena Devanka admitted that she was often jealous during her marriage with Jonathan..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2243) "

JAKARTA – Dhena Devanka admitted that she was often jealous during her marriage with Jonathan Frizzy. Then the issue of a third person became more widely heard in the midst of the rift in the second household.

Ibnu Ali Tindri as a lawyer assesses that Dhena’s jealousy as a wife is commonplace. However, he regretted the excessive attitude of the actor who is often called Ijonk in response to his client’s jealousy.

That is why many suspect the breakdown of the household due to the presence of a third person. However, the lawyers were reluctant to disclose the matter to the media.

Also Read:

Jonathan Frizzy Injects His Own Covid-19 Vaccine, Where is Dhena Devanka?

Jonathan Frizzy Reluctant to Talk Divorce Rumors with Dhena Devanka of Different Religion

“If you’re jealous, it’s natural for every wife to be jealous, only if there is an excessive reaction to the reaction of a jealous wife, you should ask the other side, yes, because Mrs. Dhena is natural as a wife if there is jealousy in a household,” said Ibnu Ali Tindri as attorney, Saturday (4/9/2021).

However, Dhena admitted that she had demanded an explanation from her husband when she felt the fire of jealousy. Unfortunately, Ijonk did not give a definite answer regarding Dhena Devanka’s question when he asked for an explanation. The mother of three also said this action was an accumulation of a series of household problems with Ijonk.

“Because of this, sir, for several years there has been an explanation, as if I asked my husband for clarification, but he couldn’t give me a reasonable answer. So this is an accumulation of perhaps our unfinished problems,” said Dhena Devanka.

As is known, the issue of the third person has emerged to the public recently. Rumors circulated that Ijonk was ‘playing with fire’ with the alleged actress Ririn Dwi Ariyanti. The reason is, the fate of Ririn’s household with Aldi Bragi is also on the brink.

(aln)

" } ["summary"]=> string(102) "JAKARTA – Dhena Devanka admitted that she was often jealous during her marriage with Jonathan..." ["atom_content"]=> string(2243) "

JAKARTA – Dhena Devanka admitted that she was often jealous during her marriage with Jonathan Frizzy. Then the issue of a third person became more widely heard in the midst of the rift in the second household.

Ibnu Ali Tindri as a lawyer assesses that Dhena’s jealousy as a wife is commonplace. However, he regretted the excessive attitude of the actor who is often called Ijonk in response to his client’s jealousy.

That is why many suspect the breakdown of the household due to the presence of a third person. However, the lawyers were reluctant to disclose the matter to the media.

Also Read:

Jonathan Frizzy Injects His Own Covid-19 Vaccine, Where is Dhena Devanka?

Jonathan Frizzy Reluctant to Talk Divorce Rumors with Dhena Devanka of Different Religion

“If you’re jealous, it’s natural for every wife to be jealous, only if there is an excessive reaction to the reaction of a jealous wife, you should ask the other side, yes, because Mrs. Dhena is natural as a wife if there is jealousy in a household,” said Ibnu Ali Tindri as attorney, Saturday (4/9/2021).

However, Dhena admitted that she had demanded an explanation from her husband when she felt the fire of jealousy. Unfortunately, Ijonk did not give a definite answer regarding Dhena Devanka’s question when he asked for an explanation. The mother of three also said this action was an accumulation of a series of household problems with Ijonk.

“Because of this, sir, for several years there has been an explanation, as if I asked my husband for clarification, but he couldn’t give me a reasonable answer. So this is an accumulation of perhaps our unfinished problems,” said Dhena Devanka.

As is known, the issue of the third person has emerged to the public recently. Rumors circulated that Ijonk was ‘playing with fire’ with the alleged actress Ririn Dwi Ariyanti. The reason is, the fate of Ririn’s household with Aldi Bragi is also on the brink.

(aln)

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630761647) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(84) "Frankly, Denny Darko Admits Lying when Predicting Deddy Corbuzier: Okezone Celebrity" ["link"]=> string(135) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/celebrity/2021/09/04/frankly-denny-darko-admits-lying-when-predicting-deddy-corbuzier-okezone-celebrity/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(16) "Sandy Richardson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 12:18:24 +0000" ["category"]=> string(77) "CelebrityAdmitscelebrityCorbuzierDarkoDeddyDennyFranklyLyingOkezonePredicting" ["guid"]=> string(135) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/celebrity/2021/09/04/frankly-denny-darko-admits-lying-when-predicting-deddy-corbuzier-okezone-celebrity/" ["description"]=> string(85) "JAKARTA – Denny Darko, who is usually known as a tarot card reader, is being..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2793) "

JAKARTA – Denny Darko, who is usually known as a tarot card reader, is being targeted by netizens after Deddy Corbuzier gave him a stern warning. This is because Denny Darko’s prediction about Deddy Corbuzier who had disappeared from cyberspace proved to be wrong.

Denny Darko also apologized to the Indonesian public through a video he uploaded on his Instagram account, Friday (27/08/2021).

Also Read:

Deddy Corbuzier Sprays Denny Darko: You’re Lying

Denny Darko Apologizes: I Can’t Possibly See Master Deddy Corbuzier

“Hello sense seeker, in this video I am Denny Darko with all humility I apologize to all of you, for what I and the content made regarding Master Deddy’s off from social media and podcasts,” he said at the beginning of the video.

Denny predicted that Deddy Corbuzier’s termination was not due to Covid-19 and it turned out that his prediction was wrong.

“It turns out that my prediction was wrong, I was wrong. And it seems that I really can’t see a master Deddy Corbuzier,” he said.

Denny Darko made two videos containing his predictions about the magician. In the first video, Denny said the reason Deddy left social media was not because of Covid-19, but because Deddy was preparing a big project related to his past.

The second video which was uploaded a few days after Deddy appeared (currently it has been taken down), Denny said he deliberately spoke like that (in the first video) because an informant ordered him not to spread the news that Deddy was infected with Covid-19.

Knowing this, Deddy responded and said that it was not true. Finally, Denny admitted his lie through the video. He asserted that his statement of getting information from other people was a lie that he made up.

Denny said that he had tried to contact Deddy to apologize personally. He admitted that he was very sad to have disappointed the people he had made his teacher, role model, and model in his magic career.

“It is impossible for a Denny Darko to get what I have now without a master Deddy Corbuzier,” he said.

Furthermore, Denny reiterated that he apologized to Deddy Corbuzier and said he never wanted this in the slightest.

“I’m sorry for what I’ve done. I never at all expected this to happen. Please forgive me,” he continued.

His upload was flooded with netizen comments. There are those who criticize sharply and there are also those who appreciate the courage to admit mistakes.

(aln)

" } ["summary"]=> string(85) "JAKARTA – Denny Darko, who is usually known as a tarot card reader, is being..." ["atom_content"]=> string(2793) "

JAKARTA – Denny Darko, who is usually known as a tarot card reader, is being targeted by netizens after Deddy Corbuzier gave him a stern warning. This is because Denny Darko’s prediction about Deddy Corbuzier who had disappeared from cyberspace proved to be wrong.

Denny Darko also apologized to the Indonesian public through a video he uploaded on his Instagram account, Friday (27/08/2021).

Also Read:

Deddy Corbuzier Sprays Denny Darko: You’re Lying

Denny Darko Apologizes: I Can’t Possibly See Master Deddy Corbuzier

“Hello sense seeker, in this video I am Denny Darko with all humility I apologize to all of you, for what I and the content made regarding Master Deddy’s off from social media and podcasts,” he said at the beginning of the video.

Denny predicted that Deddy Corbuzier’s termination was not due to Covid-19 and it turned out that his prediction was wrong.

“It turns out that my prediction was wrong, I was wrong. And it seems that I really can’t see a master Deddy Corbuzier,” he said.

Denny Darko made two videos containing his predictions about the magician. In the first video, Denny said the reason Deddy left social media was not because of Covid-19, but because Deddy was preparing a big project related to his past.

The second video which was uploaded a few days after Deddy appeared (currently it has been taken down), Denny said he deliberately spoke like that (in the first video) because an informant ordered him not to spread the news that Deddy was infected with Covid-19.

Knowing this, Deddy responded and said that it was not true. Finally, Denny admitted his lie through the video. He asserted that his statement of getting information from other people was a lie that he made up.

Denny said that he had tried to contact Deddy to apologize personally. He admitted that he was very sad to have disappointed the people he had made his teacher, role model, and model in his magic career.

“It is impossible for a Denny Darko to get what I have now without a master Deddy Corbuzier,” he said.

Furthermore, Denny reiterated that he apologized to Deddy Corbuzier and said he never wanted this in the slightest.

“I’m sorry for what I’ve done. I never at all expected this to happen. Please forgive me,” he continued.

His upload was flooded with netizen comments. There are those who criticize sharply and there are also those who appreciate the courage to admit mistakes.

(aln)

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630757904) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(105) "Nano ‘camera’ made using molecular glue allows real-time monitoring of chemical reactions – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(158) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/nano-camera-made-using-molecular-glue-allows-real-time-monitoring-of-chemical-reactions-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 11:22:37 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(158) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/nano-camera-made-using-molecular-glue-allows-real-time-monitoring-of-chemical-reactions-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(105) "Journal Reference: Kamil Sokołowski, Junyang Huang, Tamás Földes, Jade A. McCune, David D. Xu, Bart..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6951) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Kamil Sokołowski, Junyang Huang, Tamás Földes, Jade A. McCune, David D. Xu, Bart de Nijs, Rohit Chikkaraddy, Sean M. Collins, Edina Rosta, Jeremy J. Baumberg, Oren A. Scherman. Nanoparticle surfactants for kinetically arrested photoactive assemblies to track light-induced electron transfer. Nature Nanotechnology, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41565-021-00949-6

The device, made by a team from the University of Cambridge, combines tiny semiconductor nanocrystals called quantum dots and gold nanoparticles using molecular glue called cucurbituril (CB). When added to water with the molecule to be studied, the components self-assemble in seconds into a stable, powerful tool that allows the real-time monitoring of chemical reactions.

The camera harvests light within the semiconductors, inducing electron transfer processes like those that occur in photosynthesis, which can be monitored using incorporated gold nanoparticle sensors and spectroscopic techniques. They were able to use the camera to observe chemical species which had been previously theorised but not directly observed.

The platform could be used to study a wide range of molecules for a variety of potential applications, such as the improvement of photocatalysis and photovoltaics for renewable energy. The results are reported in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Nature controls the assemblies of complex structures at the molecular scale through self-limiting processes. However, mimicking these processes in the lab is usually time-consuming, expensive and reliant on complex procedures.

“In order to develop new materials with superior properties, we often combine different chemical species together to come up with a hybrid material that has the properties we want,” said Professor Oren Scherman from Cambridge’s Yusuf Hamied Department of Chemistry, who led the research. “But making these hybrid nanostructures is difficult, and you often end up with uncontrolled growth or materials that are unstable.”

The new method that Scherman and his colleagues from Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory and University College London developed uses cucurbituril — a molecular glue which interacts strongly with both semiconductor quantum dots and gold nanoparticles. The researchers used small semiconductor nanocrystals to control the assembly of larger nanoparticles through a process they coined interfacial self-limiting aggregation. The process leads to permeable and stable hybrid materials that interact with light. The camera was used to observe photocatalysis and track light-induced electron transfer.

“We were surprised how powerful this new tool is, considering how straightforward it is to assemble,” said first author Dr Kamil Sokolowski, also from the Department of Chemistry.

To make their nano camera, the team added the individual components, along with the molecule they wanted to observe, to water at room temperature. Previously, when gold nanoparticles were mixed with the molecular glue in the absence of quantum dots, the components underwent unlimited aggregation and fell out of solution. However, with the strategy developed by the researchers, quantum dots mediate the assembly of these nanostructures so that the semiconductor-metal hybrids control and limit their own size and shape. In addition, these structures stay stable for weeks.

“This self-limiting property was surprising, it wasn’t anything we expected to see,” said co-author Dr Jade McCune, also from the Department of Chemistry. “We found that the aggregation of one nanoparticulate component could be controlled through the addition of another nanoparticle component.”

When the researchers mixed the components together, the team used spectroscopy to observe chemical reactions in real time. Using the camera, they were able to observe the formation of radical species — a molecule with an unpaired electron — and products of their assembly such as sigma dimeric viologen species, where two radicals form a reversible carbon-carbon bond. The latter species had been theorised but never observed.

“People have spent their whole careers getting pieces of matter to come together in a controlled way,” said Scherman, who is also Director of the Melville Laboratory. “This platform will unlock a wide range of processes, including many materials and chemistries that are important for sustainable technologies. The full potential of semiconductor and plasmonic nanocrystals can now be explored, providing an opportunity to simultaneously induce and observe photochemical reactions.”

“This platform is a really big toolbox considering the number of metal and semiconductor building blocks that can be now coupled together using this chemistry- it opens up lots of new possibilities for imaging chemical reactions and sensing through taking snapshots of monitored chemical systems,” said Sokolowski. “The simplicity of the setup means that researchers no longer need complex, expensive methods to get the same results.”

Researchers from the Scherman lab are currently working to further develop these hybrids towards artificial photosynthetic systems and (photo)catalysis where electron-transfer processes can be observed directly in real time. The team is also looking at mechanisms of carbon-carbon bond formation as well as electrode interfaces for battery applications.

The research was carried out in collaboration with Professor Jeremy Baumberg at Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory and Dr Edina Rosta at University College London. It was funded in part by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Nano ‘camera’ made using molecular glue allows real-time monitoring of chemical reactions

" } ["summary"]=> string(105) "Journal Reference: Kamil Sokołowski, Junyang Huang, Tamás Földes, Jade A. McCune, David D. Xu, Bart..." ["atom_content"]=> string(6951) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Kamil Sokołowski, Junyang Huang, Tamás Földes, Jade A. McCune, David D. Xu, Bart de Nijs, Rohit Chikkaraddy, Sean M. Collins, Edina Rosta, Jeremy J. Baumberg, Oren A. Scherman. Nanoparticle surfactants for kinetically arrested photoactive assemblies to track light-induced electron transfer. Nature Nanotechnology, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41565-021-00949-6

The device, made by a team from the University of Cambridge, combines tiny semiconductor nanocrystals called quantum dots and gold nanoparticles using molecular glue called cucurbituril (CB). When added to water with the molecule to be studied, the components self-assemble in seconds into a stable, powerful tool that allows the real-time monitoring of chemical reactions.

The camera harvests light within the semiconductors, inducing electron transfer processes like those that occur in photosynthesis, which can be monitored using incorporated gold nanoparticle sensors and spectroscopic techniques. They were able to use the camera to observe chemical species which had been previously theorised but not directly observed.

The platform could be used to study a wide range of molecules for a variety of potential applications, such as the improvement of photocatalysis and photovoltaics for renewable energy. The results are reported in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Nature controls the assemblies of complex structures at the molecular scale through self-limiting processes. However, mimicking these processes in the lab is usually time-consuming, expensive and reliant on complex procedures.

“In order to develop new materials with superior properties, we often combine different chemical species together to come up with a hybrid material that has the properties we want,” said Professor Oren Scherman from Cambridge’s Yusuf Hamied Department of Chemistry, who led the research. “But making these hybrid nanostructures is difficult, and you often end up with uncontrolled growth or materials that are unstable.”

The new method that Scherman and his colleagues from Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory and University College London developed uses cucurbituril — a molecular glue which interacts strongly with both semiconductor quantum dots and gold nanoparticles. The researchers used small semiconductor nanocrystals to control the assembly of larger nanoparticles through a process they coined interfacial self-limiting aggregation. The process leads to permeable and stable hybrid materials that interact with light. The camera was used to observe photocatalysis and track light-induced electron transfer.

“We were surprised how powerful this new tool is, considering how straightforward it is to assemble,” said first author Dr Kamil Sokolowski, also from the Department of Chemistry.

To make their nano camera, the team added the individual components, along with the molecule they wanted to observe, to water at room temperature. Previously, when gold nanoparticles were mixed with the molecular glue in the absence of quantum dots, the components underwent unlimited aggregation and fell out of solution. However, with the strategy developed by the researchers, quantum dots mediate the assembly of these nanostructures so that the semiconductor-metal hybrids control and limit their own size and shape. In addition, these structures stay stable for weeks.

“This self-limiting property was surprising, it wasn’t anything we expected to see,” said co-author Dr Jade McCune, also from the Department of Chemistry. “We found that the aggregation of one nanoparticulate component could be controlled through the addition of another nanoparticle component.”

When the researchers mixed the components together, the team used spectroscopy to observe chemical reactions in real time. Using the camera, they were able to observe the formation of radical species — a molecule with an unpaired electron — and products of their assembly such as sigma dimeric viologen species, where two radicals form a reversible carbon-carbon bond. The latter species had been theorised but never observed.

“People have spent their whole careers getting pieces of matter to come together in a controlled way,” said Scherman, who is also Director of the Melville Laboratory. “This platform will unlock a wide range of processes, including many materials and chemistries that are important for sustainable technologies. The full potential of semiconductor and plasmonic nanocrystals can now be explored, providing an opportunity to simultaneously induce and observe photochemical reactions.”

“This platform is a really big toolbox considering the number of metal and semiconductor building blocks that can be now coupled together using this chemistry- it opens up lots of new possibilities for imaging chemical reactions and sensing through taking snapshots of monitored chemical systems,” said Sokolowski. “The simplicity of the setup means that researchers no longer need complex, expensive methods to get the same results.”

Researchers from the Scherman lab are currently working to further develop these hybrids towards artificial photosynthetic systems and (photo)catalysis where electron-transfer processes can be observed directly in real time. The team is also looking at mechanisms of carbon-carbon bond formation as well as electrode interfaces for battery applications.

The research was carried out in collaboration with Professor Jeremy Baumberg at Cambridge’s Cavendish Laboratory and Dr Edina Rosta at University College London. It was funded in part by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Nano ‘camera’ made using molecular glue allows real-time monitoring of chemical reactions

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630754557) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(103) "In addition to methamphetamine, the police found this item at Coki Pardede’s house: Okezone Celebrity" ["link"]=> string(151) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/celebrity/2021/09/04/in-addition-to-methamphetamine-the-police-found-this-item-at-coki-pardedes-house-okezone-celebrity/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(16) "Sandy Richardson" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 11:16:44 +0000" ["category"]=> string(75) "CelebrityadditioncelebrityCokiHouseitemmethamphetamineOkezonePardedespolice" ["guid"]=> string(151) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/celebrity/2021/09/04/in-addition-to-methamphetamine-the-police-found-this-item-at-coki-pardedes-house-okezone-celebrity/" ["description"]=> string(98) "JAKARTA – Head of Public Relations of Polda Metro Jaya, Kombes Pol Yusri Yunus, explained..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2637) "

JAKARTA – Head of Public Relations of Polda Metro Jaya, Kombes Pol Yusri Yunus, explained the chronology of the arrest of comedian and YouTuber Coki Pardede for drug abuse cases.

Yusri Yunus said that this case started from a community report. Initially the police managed to secure a woman with the initials WL, who was referred to as a courier who delivered methamphetamine to Coki Pardede.

This woman with the initials WL was arrested in one of the apartments in the Pesanggrahan area, South Jakarta on August 31, 2021 at 17.00 WIB.

Also Read:

Chronology of Coki Pardede’s Arrest, Police Arrested Courier First

Coki Pardede uses methamphetamine, MLI: I’ve known for a long time

“We know that WL is a courier delivering methamphetamine to someone who has just delivered the results of an interrogation. Indeed, WL has just delivered to RP alias CP (Coki Pardede) one of the public figures who usually appear on social media,” said Yusri Yunus to reporters, Saturday (4/9/2021).

Meanwhile, Coki Pardede itself was found in the Pagedangan area, Tangerang City Regency on Wednesday (1/9/2021). In this case, several items of evidence were found, namely methamphetamine and syringes.

“We also found 0.3 grams of remaining methamphetamine and a syringe,” he said.

Yusri Yunus said that the RP man had known the woman with the initials WL for about 2 years. “RP is a user who has known WL for about 2 years. Every time you want to use goods, please buy through WL’s brother, this is what we will explore again because WL is RA’s own courier,” he said.

Meanwhile, RA, who is known to be his own supplier, was arrested at his residence on Friday (2/9/2021) in Karawaci, Tangerang. It is known that the police found some evidence, such as methamphetamine.

“When a search was carried out in RA, we found methamphetamine that we found at RA’s residence. The evidence was approximately 11 grams,” he continued.

On the other hand, Yusri Yunus said he was still investigating this case. Some of the people involved were RP alias Coki Pardede, a courier with the initials WL and a dealer with the initials RA.

“We are still investigating 3 people, while they are subject to articles 114, 112, UU RI No. 35 of 2009 concerning narcotics, the threat is 6 years in prison,” he said.

" } ["summary"]=> string(98) "JAKARTA – Head of Public Relations of Polda Metro Jaya, Kombes Pol Yusri Yunus, explained..." ["atom_content"]=> string(2637) "

JAKARTA – Head of Public Relations of Polda Metro Jaya, Kombes Pol Yusri Yunus, explained the chronology of the arrest of comedian and YouTuber Coki Pardede for drug abuse cases.

Yusri Yunus said that this case started from a community report. Initially the police managed to secure a woman with the initials WL, who was referred to as a courier who delivered methamphetamine to Coki Pardede.

This woman with the initials WL was arrested in one of the apartments in the Pesanggrahan area, South Jakarta on August 31, 2021 at 17.00 WIB.

Also Read:

Chronology of Coki Pardede’s Arrest, Police Arrested Courier First

Coki Pardede uses methamphetamine, MLI: I’ve known for a long time

“We know that WL is a courier delivering methamphetamine to someone who has just delivered the results of an interrogation. Indeed, WL has just delivered to RP alias CP (Coki Pardede) one of the public figures who usually appear on social media,” said Yusri Yunus to reporters, Saturday (4/9/2021).

Meanwhile, Coki Pardede itself was found in the Pagedangan area, Tangerang City Regency on Wednesday (1/9/2021). In this case, several items of evidence were found, namely methamphetamine and syringes.

“We also found 0.3 grams of remaining methamphetamine and a syringe,” he said.

Yusri Yunus said that the RP man had known the woman with the initials WL for about 2 years. “RP is a user who has known WL for about 2 years. Every time you want to use goods, please buy through WL’s brother, this is what we will explore again because WL is RA’s own courier,” he said.

Meanwhile, RA, who is known to be his own supplier, was arrested at his residence on Friday (2/9/2021) in Karawaci, Tangerang. It is known that the police found some evidence, such as methamphetamine.

“When a search was carried out in RA, we found methamphetamine that we found at RA’s residence. The evidence was approximately 11 grams,” he continued.

On the other hand, Yusri Yunus said he was still investigating this case. Some of the people involved were RP alias Coki Pardede, a courier with the initials WL and a dealer with the initials RA.

“We are still investigating 3 people, while they are subject to articles 114, 112, UU RI No. 35 of 2009 concerning narcotics, the threat is 6 years in prison,” he said.

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630754204) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(95) "Researchers discover connection between brain’s opioid system and eating behavior – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(151) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/researchers-discover-connection-between-brains-opioid-system-and-eating-behavior-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 10:20:34 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(151) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/researchers-discover-connection-between-brains-opioid-system-and-eating-behavior-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(132) "Journal Reference: Tatu Kantonen, Tomi Karjalainen, Laura Pekkarinen, Janne Isojärvi, Kari Kalliokoski, Valtteri Kaasinen, Jussi..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(2953) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Tatu Kantonen, Tomi Karjalainen, Laura Pekkarinen, Janne Isojärvi, Kari Kalliokoski, Valtteri Kaasinen, Jussi Hirvonen, Pirjo Nuutila, Lauri Nummenmaa. Cerebral μ-opioid and CB1 receptor systems have distinct roles in human feeding behavior. Translational Psychiatry, 2021; 11 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41398-021-01559-5

Animal studies have established that the brain’s opioid and endocannabinoid systems are important in regulating eating behavior and mediate the food reward experience. For instance, alterations in these systems’ signaling have been associated with obesity. In general, both internal signals of the body, such as fluctuation in blood sugar levels, and external stimuli, such as food advertisements, can spark an appetite in humans.

In their new study, researchers at the University of Turku, Finland, investigated the connection between the brain’s opioid and endocannabinoid signaling and different types of eating behavior. They discovered that the function of the opioid system is connected to eating triggered by external stimuli.

“The less binding sites there were for the opioids, the greater was the tendency to eat in response to external stimuli, such as seeing appetizing food. Moreover, the number of binding sites for endocannabinoids was connected to several different types of eating behavior, describes first author,” Doctoral Candidate Tatu Kantonen from the University of Turku.

According to Kantonen, the results indicate that especially the opioid system could be a potential target for anti-obesity drugs in humans.

The research data was obtained from the AIVO database hosted by the Turku PET Centre.

Researchers discover connection between brain’s opioid system and eating behavior

" } ["summary"]=> string(132) "Journal Reference: Tatu Kantonen, Tomi Karjalainen, Laura Pekkarinen, Janne Isojärvi, Kari Kalliokoski, Valtteri Kaasinen, Jussi..." ["atom_content"]=> string(2953) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Tatu Kantonen, Tomi Karjalainen, Laura Pekkarinen, Janne Isojärvi, Kari Kalliokoski, Valtteri Kaasinen, Jussi Hirvonen, Pirjo Nuutila, Lauri Nummenmaa. Cerebral μ-opioid and CB1 receptor systems have distinct roles in human feeding behavior. Translational Psychiatry, 2021; 11 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41398-021-01559-5

Animal studies have established that the brain’s opioid and endocannabinoid systems are important in regulating eating behavior and mediate the food reward experience. For instance, alterations in these systems’ signaling have been associated with obesity. In general, both internal signals of the body, such as fluctuation in blood sugar levels, and external stimuli, such as food advertisements, can spark an appetite in humans.

In their new study, researchers at the University of Turku, Finland, investigated the connection between the brain’s opioid and endocannabinoid signaling and different types of eating behavior. They discovered that the function of the opioid system is connected to eating triggered by external stimuli.

“The less binding sites there were for the opioids, the greater was the tendency to eat in response to external stimuli, such as seeing appetizing food. Moreover, the number of binding sites for endocannabinoids was connected to several different types of eating behavior, describes first author,” Doctoral Candidate Tatu Kantonen from the University of Turku.

According to Kantonen, the results indicate that especially the opioid system could be a potential target for anti-obesity drugs in humans.

The research data was obtained from the AIVO database hosted by the Turku PET Centre.

Researchers discover connection between brain’s opioid system and eating behavior

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630750834) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(61) "Gut and heart signals affect how we see ourselves – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(120) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/gut-and-heart-signals-affect-how-we-see-ourselves-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 09:18:13 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(120) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/gut-and-heart-signals-affect-how-we-see-ourselves-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(121) "Journal Reference: Jennifer Todd, Pasquale Cardellicchio, Viren Swami, Flavia Cardini, Jane E. Aspell. Weaker implicit..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5619) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Jennifer Todd, Pasquale Cardellicchio, Viren Swami, Flavia Cardini, Jane E. Aspell. Weaker implicit interoception is associated with more negative body image: Evidence from gastric-alpha phase amplitude coupling and the heartbeat evoked potential. Cortex, 2021; DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2021.07.006

Published in the journal Cortex, the study is the first to investigate, and first to identify, the association between body image and the brain’s processing of internal signals that occur unconsciously.

Carried out by a team of psychologists and neuroscientists at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), the study found that adults whose brains are less efficient at detecting these internal messages are more likely to experience body shame and weight preoccupation.

This research could have therapeutic implications for people suffering with conditions in which body image plays a significant role. For example, the unconscious signals could be made conscious. Further research could even be applied to the clinic as it may be the case that brain responses to gut signals could indicate a predisposition to eating disorders.

The study participants — a group of healthy UK adults — first took part in four body image assessments to measure their feelings of body appreciation, body functionality appreciation, body shame, and weight preoccupation.

The researchers then carried out measurements of the participants’ internal signals. Some of the messages from the heart and gut are processed at an unconscious level and the nervous system interprets these signals to provide the brain with continuously updated information about the body’s internal state.

The strength of the connection between the gut and the brain was measured by recording the electrical activity of both regions at the same time. The researchers also measured brain responses to heartbeats.

They found that weaker brain responses to the gut and heart were both significantly associated with greater levels of body shame and weight preoccupation amongst the participants.

Senior author Dr Jane Aspell, Associate Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), said: “We experience our body both from the inside and out: we can be aware of how our skin and limbs look, but also of how hungry we feel or how strongly our heart is beating during exercise. The brain also continuously processes internal signals that we are not conscious of.

“We found that when the brain is less responsive to these implicit signals from inside the body, individuals are more likely to hold negative views about their external bodily appearance. It may be that when the brain has a weaker connection to the internal body, the brain puts more emphasis on the external body and so appearance becomes much more important for self-evaluation.”

Lead author Dr Jennifer Todd, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), said: “Our research could have implications for those experiencing negative body image, which can have a serious impact on people’s lives.

“The gut and heart signal measurements used in our study could potentially act as a biomarker to help identify, or even predict, negative body image and associated conditions, such as eating disorders. Additionally, by training people to become more aware of internal sensations, it might be possible to amplify these unconscious signals.

“We need to understand why some brains are better at detecting these internal signals than others. We expect it is partly due to differences in neuro-anatomical connections between the brain and internal organs, and this will be the subject of future research.”

Meanwhile, Dr Jane Aspell will be speaking about her research on the body and sense of self in a talk at the British Science Festival 2021, 7-11 September hosted by the British Science Association at Anglia Ruskin University. The talk will explore research on out of body experiences (OBEs), and she will share case studies from neurological patients.

Dr Aspell’s work investigates what happens in the brain during an OBE and she will present evidence that these are caused by abnormal functioning in parts of the brain that process and combine signals from our bodies. This research on neurological patients sheds light on how the healthy brain generates the experience of one’s self, and what happens when that construction temporarily goes ‘wrong’.

Gut and heart signals affect how we see ourselves

" } ["summary"]=> string(121) "Journal Reference: Jennifer Todd, Pasquale Cardellicchio, Viren Swami, Flavia Cardini, Jane E. Aspell. Weaker implicit..." ["atom_content"]=> string(5619) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Jennifer Todd, Pasquale Cardellicchio, Viren Swami, Flavia Cardini, Jane E. Aspell. Weaker implicit interoception is associated with more negative body image: Evidence from gastric-alpha phase amplitude coupling and the heartbeat evoked potential. Cortex, 2021; DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2021.07.006

Published in the journal Cortex, the study is the first to investigate, and first to identify, the association between body image and the brain’s processing of internal signals that occur unconsciously.

Carried out by a team of psychologists and neuroscientists at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), the study found that adults whose brains are less efficient at detecting these internal messages are more likely to experience body shame and weight preoccupation.

This research could have therapeutic implications for people suffering with conditions in which body image plays a significant role. For example, the unconscious signals could be made conscious. Further research could even be applied to the clinic as it may be the case that brain responses to gut signals could indicate a predisposition to eating disorders.

The study participants — a group of healthy UK adults — first took part in four body image assessments to measure their feelings of body appreciation, body functionality appreciation, body shame, and weight preoccupation.

The researchers then carried out measurements of the participants’ internal signals. Some of the messages from the heart and gut are processed at an unconscious level and the nervous system interprets these signals to provide the brain with continuously updated information about the body’s internal state.

The strength of the connection between the gut and the brain was measured by recording the electrical activity of both regions at the same time. The researchers also measured brain responses to heartbeats.

They found that weaker brain responses to the gut and heart were both significantly associated with greater levels of body shame and weight preoccupation amongst the participants.

Senior author Dr Jane Aspell, Associate Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), said: “We experience our body both from the inside and out: we can be aware of how our skin and limbs look, but also of how hungry we feel or how strongly our heart is beating during exercise. The brain also continuously processes internal signals that we are not conscious of.

“We found that when the brain is less responsive to these implicit signals from inside the body, individuals are more likely to hold negative views about their external bodily appearance. It may be that when the brain has a weaker connection to the internal body, the brain puts more emphasis on the external body and so appearance becomes much more important for self-evaluation.”

Lead author Dr Jennifer Todd, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Anglia Ruskin University (ARU), said: “Our research could have implications for those experiencing negative body image, which can have a serious impact on people’s lives.

“The gut and heart signal measurements used in our study could potentially act as a biomarker to help identify, or even predict, negative body image and associated conditions, such as eating disorders. Additionally, by training people to become more aware of internal sensations, it might be possible to amplify these unconscious signals.

“We need to understand why some brains are better at detecting these internal signals than others. We expect it is partly due to differences in neuro-anatomical connections between the brain and internal organs, and this will be the subject of future research.”

Meanwhile, Dr Jane Aspell will be speaking about her research on the body and sense of self in a talk at the British Science Festival 2021, 7-11 September hosted by the British Science Association at Anglia Ruskin University. The talk will explore research on out of body experiences (OBEs), and she will share case studies from neurological patients.

Dr Aspell’s work investigates what happens in the brain during an OBE and she will present evidence that these are caused by abnormal functioning in parts of the brain that process and combine signals from our bodies. This research on neurological patients sheds light on how the healthy brain generates the experience of one’s self, and what happens when that construction temporarily goes ‘wrong’.

Gut and heart signals affect how we see ourselves

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630747093) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(97) "New food freezing concept improves high quality, increases safety and cuts energy use – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(155) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/new-food-freezing-concept-improves-high-quality-increases-safety-and-cuts-energy-use-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 08:16:41 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(155) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/new-food-freezing-concept-improves-high-quality-increases-safety-and-cuts-energy-use-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(125) "Journal Reference: Yuanheng Zhao, Matthew J. Powell-Palm, Junjie Wang, Cristina Bilbao-Sainz, Tara McHugh, Boris Rubinsky...." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4771) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Yuanheng Zhao, Matthew J. Powell-Palm, Junjie Wang, Cristina Bilbao-Sainz, Tara McHugh, Boris Rubinsky. Analysis of global energy savings in the frozen food industry made possible by transitioning from conventional isobaric freezing to isochoric freezing. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2021; 151: 111621 DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2021.111621

“A complete change over to this new method of food freezing worldwide could cut energy use by as much as 6.5 billion kilowatt-hours each year while reducing the carbon emissions that go along with generating that power by 4.6 billion kg, the equivalent of removing roughly one million cars from roads,” said ARS research food technologist Cristina Bilbao-Sainz. She is with the Healthy Processed Foods Research Unit, part of ARS’s Western Regional Research Center (WRRC) in Albany.

“These savings could be achieved without requiring any significant changes in current frozen food manufacturing equipment and infrastructure, if food manufacturers adopt this concept,” Bilbao-Sainz added.

The new freezing method, called isochoric freezing, works by storing foods in a sealed, rigid container — typically made of hard plastic or metal — completely filled with a liquid such as water. Unlike conventional freezing in which the food is exposed to the air and freezes solid at temperatures below 32 degrees F, isochoric freezing preserves food without turning it to solid ice.

As long as the food stays immersed in the liquid portion, it is protected from ice crystallization, which is the main threat to food quality.

“Energy savings come from not having to freeze foods completely solid, which uses a huge amount of energy, plus there is no need to resort to energy-intensive cold storage protocols such as quick freezing to avoid ice crystal formation,” Bilbao-Sainz said.

Isochoric freezing also allows for higher quality storage of fresh foods such as tomatoes, sweet cherries and potatoes that are otherwise difficult to preserve with conventional freezing.

Another benefit of isochoric freezing is that it also kills microbial contaminants during processing.

“The entire food production chain could use isochoric freezing — everyone from growers to food processors, product producers to wholesalers, to retailers. The process will even work in a person’s freezer at home after they purchase a product — all without requiring any major investments in new equipment,” said WRRC center director Tara McHugh, co-leader of this study. “With all of the many potential benefits, if this innovative concept catches on, it could be the next revolution in freezing foods.”

UC-Berkeley biomedical engineer Boris Rubinsky, co-leader of this project, first developed the isochoric freezing method to cryopreserve tissues and organs for transplants.

Since then, ARS and UC-Berkeley have applied for a joint patent for applying isochoric freezing to preserving food. The research team is now developing the best applications for this technology in the frozen foods industry, especially scaling up the technology to an industrial level. They also are seeking commercial partners to help transfer the technology to the commercial sector.

UC-Berkeley mechanical engineer Matthew Powell-Palm, one of the lead authors of the study paper, noted that “isochoric freezing is a cross-cutting technology with promising applications in not only the food industry, but in medicine, biology, even space travel.”

New food freezing concept improves high quality, increases safety and cuts energy use

" } ["summary"]=> string(125) "Journal Reference: Yuanheng Zhao, Matthew J. Powell-Palm, Junjie Wang, Cristina Bilbao-Sainz, Tara McHugh, Boris Rubinsky...." ["atom_content"]=> string(4771) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Yuanheng Zhao, Matthew J. Powell-Palm, Junjie Wang, Cristina Bilbao-Sainz, Tara McHugh, Boris Rubinsky. Analysis of global energy savings in the frozen food industry made possible by transitioning from conventional isobaric freezing to isochoric freezing. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 2021; 151: 111621 DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2021.111621

“A complete change over to this new method of food freezing worldwide could cut energy use by as much as 6.5 billion kilowatt-hours each year while reducing the carbon emissions that go along with generating that power by 4.6 billion kg, the equivalent of removing roughly one million cars from roads,” said ARS research food technologist Cristina Bilbao-Sainz. She is with the Healthy Processed Foods Research Unit, part of ARS’s Western Regional Research Center (WRRC) in Albany.

“These savings could be achieved without requiring any significant changes in current frozen food manufacturing equipment and infrastructure, if food manufacturers adopt this concept,” Bilbao-Sainz added.

The new freezing method, called isochoric freezing, works by storing foods in a sealed, rigid container — typically made of hard plastic or metal — completely filled with a liquid such as water. Unlike conventional freezing in which the food is exposed to the air and freezes solid at temperatures below 32 degrees F, isochoric freezing preserves food without turning it to solid ice.

As long as the food stays immersed in the liquid portion, it is protected from ice crystallization, which is the main threat to food quality.

“Energy savings come from not having to freeze foods completely solid, which uses a huge amount of energy, plus there is no need to resort to energy-intensive cold storage protocols such as quick freezing to avoid ice crystal formation,” Bilbao-Sainz said.

Isochoric freezing also allows for higher quality storage of fresh foods such as tomatoes, sweet cherries and potatoes that are otherwise difficult to preserve with conventional freezing.

Another benefit of isochoric freezing is that it also kills microbial contaminants during processing.

“The entire food production chain could use isochoric freezing — everyone from growers to food processors, product producers to wholesalers, to retailers. The process will even work in a person’s freezer at home after they purchase a product — all without requiring any major investments in new equipment,” said WRRC center director Tara McHugh, co-leader of this study. “With all of the many potential benefits, if this innovative concept catches on, it could be the next revolution in freezing foods.”

UC-Berkeley biomedical engineer Boris Rubinsky, co-leader of this project, first developed the isochoric freezing method to cryopreserve tissues and organs for transplants.

Since then, ARS and UC-Berkeley have applied for a joint patent for applying isochoric freezing to preserving food. The research team is now developing the best applications for this technology in the frozen foods industry, especially scaling up the technology to an industrial level. They also are seeking commercial partners to help transfer the technology to the commercial sector.

UC-Berkeley mechanical engineer Matthew Powell-Palm, one of the lead authors of the study paper, noted that “isochoric freezing is a cross-cutting technology with promising applications in not only the food industry, but in medicine, biology, even space travel.”

New food freezing concept improves high quality, increases safety and cuts energy use

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1630743401) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(59) "Astronomers create 3D-printed stellar nurseries – NovLink" ["link"]=> string(118) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/astronomers-create-3d-printed-stellar-nurseries-novlink/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(12) "Betty Foster" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Sat, 04 Sep 2021 07:14:18 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(118) "https://dentistnewsnetwork.com/health-science-news/2021/09/04/astronomers-create-3d-printed-stellar-nurseries-novlink/" ["description"]=> string(107) "Journal Reference: Nia Imara, John C. Forbes, James C. Weaver. Touching the Stars: Using High-resolution..." ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(6579) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Nia Imara, John C. Forbes, James C. Weaver. Touching the Stars: Using High-resolution 3D Printing to Visualize Stellar Nurseries. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2021; 918 (1): L3 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ac194e

Imara and her collaborators created the models using data from simulations of star-forming clouds and a sophisticated 3D printing process in which the fine-scale densities and gradients of the turbulent clouds are embedded in a transparent resin. The resulting models — the first 3D-printed stellar nurseries — are highly polished spheres about the size of a baseball (8 centimeters in diameter), in which the star-forming material appears as swirling clumps and filaments.

“We wanted an interactive object to help us visualize those structures where stars form so we can better understand the physical processes,” said Imara, an assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz and first author of a paper describing this novel approach published August 25 in Astrophysical Journal Letters.

An artist as well as an astrophysicist, Imara said the idea is an example of science imitating art. “Years ago, I sketched a portrait of myself touching a star. Later, the idea just clicked. Star formation within molecular clouds is my area of expertise, so why not try to build one?” she said.

She worked with coauthor John Forbes at the Flatiron Institute’s Center for Computational Astrophysics to develop a suite of nine simulations representing different physical conditions within molecular clouds. The collaboration also included coauthor James Weaver at Harvard University’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, who helped to turn the data from the astronomical simulations into physical objects using high-resolution and photo-realistic multi-material 3D printing.

The results are both visually striking and scientifically illuminating. “Just aesthetically they are really amazing to look at, and then you begin to notice the complex structures that are incredibly difficult to see with the usual techniques for visualizing these simulations,” Forbes said.

For example, sheet-like or pancake-shaped structures are hard to distinguish in two-dimensional slices or projections, because a section through a sheet looks like a filament.

“Within the spheres, you can clearly see a two-dimensional sheet, and inside it are little filaments, and that’s mind boggling from the perspective of someone who is trying to understand what’s going on in these simulations,” Forbes said.

The models also reveal structures that are more continuous than they would appear in 2D projections, Imara said. “If you have something winding around through space, you might not realize that two regions are connected by the same structure, so having an interactive object you can rotate in your hand allows us to detect these continuities more easily,” she said.

The nine simulations on which the models are based were designed to investigate the effects of three fundamental physical processes that govern the evolution of molecular clouds: turbulence, gravity, and magnetic fields. By changing different variables, such as the strength of the magnetic fields or how fast the gas is moving, the simulations show how different physical environments affect the morphology of substructures related to star formation.

Stars tend to form in clumps and cores located at the intersection of filaments, where the density of gas and dust becomes high enough for gravity to take over. “We think that the spins of these newborn stars will depend on the structures in which they form — stars in the same filament will ‘know’ about each other’s spins,” Imara said.

With the physical models, it doesn’t take an astrophysicist with expertise in these processes to see the differences between the simulations. “When I looked at 2D projections of the simulation data, it was often challenging to see their subtle differences, whereas with the 3D-printed models, it was obvious,” said Weaver, who has a background in biology and materials science and routinely uses 3D printing to investigate the structural details of a wide range of biological and synthetic materials.

“I’m very interested in exploring the interface between science, art, and education, and I’m passionate about using 3D printing as a tool for the presentation of complex structures and processes in an easily understandable fashion,” Weaver said. “Traditional extrusion-based 3D printing can only produce solid objects with a continuous outer surface, and that’s problematic when trying to depict, gases, clouds, or other diffuse forms. Our approach uses an inkjet-like 3D printing process to deposit tiny individual droplets of opaque resin at precise locations within a surrounding volume of transparent resin to define the cloud’s form in exquisite detail.”

He noted that in the future the models could also incorporate additional information through the use of different colors to increase their scientific value. The researchers are also interested in exploring the use of 3D printing to represent observational data from nearby molecular clouds, such as those in the constellation Orion.

The models can also serve as valuable tools for education and public outreach, said Imara, who plans to use them in an astrophysics course she will be teaching this fall.

Astronomers create 3D-printed stellar nurseries

" } ["summary"]=> string(107) "Journal Reference: Nia Imara, John C. Forbes, James C. Weaver. Touching the Stars: Using High-resolution..." ["atom_content"]=> string(6579) "

Journal Reference:

  1. Nia Imara, John C. Forbes, James C. Weaver. Touching the Stars: Using High-resolution 3D Printing to Visualize Stellar Nurseries. The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2021; 918 (1): L3 DOI: 10.3847/2041-8213/ac194e

Imara and her collaborators created the models using data from simulations of star-forming clouds and a sophisticated 3D printing process in which the fine-scale densities and gradients of the turbulent clouds are embedded in a transparent resin. The resulting models — the first 3D-printed stellar nurseries — are highly polished spheres about the size of a baseball (8 centimeters in diameter), in which the star-forming material appears as swirling clumps and filaments.

“We wanted an interactive object to help us visualize those structures where stars form so we can better understand the physical processes,” said Imara, an assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz and first author of a paper describing this novel approach published August 25 in Astrophysical Journal Letters.

An artist as well as an astrophysicist, Imara said the idea is an example of science imitating art. “Years ago, I sketched a portrait of myself touching a star. Later, the idea just clicked. Star formation within molecular clouds is my area of expertise, so why not try to build one?” she said.

She worked with coauthor John Forbes at the Flatiron Institute’s Center for Computational Astrophysics to develop a suite of nine simulations representing different physical conditions within molecular clouds. The collaboration also included coauthor James Weaver at Harvard University’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, who helped to turn the data from the astronomical simulations into physical objects using high-resolution and photo-realistic multi-material 3D printing.

The results are both visually striking and scientifically illuminating. “Just aesthetically they are really amazing to look at, and then you begin to notice the complex structures that are incredibly difficult to see with the usual techniques for visualizing these simulations,” Forbes said.

For example, sheet-like or pancake-shaped structures are hard to distinguish in two-dimensional slices or projections, because a section through a sheet looks like a filament.

“Within the spheres, you can clearly see a two-dimensional sheet, and inside it are little filaments, and that’s mind boggling from the perspective of someone who is trying to understand what’s going on in these simulations,” Forbes said.

The models also reveal structures that are more continuous than they would appear in 2D projections, Imara said. “If you have something winding around through space, you might not realize that two regions are connected by the same structure, so having an interactive object you can rotate in your hand allows us to detect these continuities more easily,” she said.

The nine simulations on which the models are based were designed to investigate the effects of three fundamental physical processes that govern the evolution of molecular clouds: turbulence, gravity, and magnetic fields. By changing different variables, such as the strength of the magnetic fields or how fast the gas is moving, the simulations show how different physical environments affect the morphology of substructures related to star formation.

Stars tend to form in clumps and cores located at the intersection of filaments, where the density of gas and dust becomes high enough for gravity to take over. “We think that the spins of these newborn stars will depend on the structures in which they form — stars in the same filament will ‘know’ about each other’s spins,” Imara said.

With the physical models, it doesn’t take an astrophysicist with expertise in these processes to see the differences between the simulations. “When I looked at 2D projections of the simulation data, it was often challenging to see their subtle differences, whereas with the 3D-printed models, it was obvious,” said Weaver, who has a background in biology and materials science and routinely uses 3D printing to investigate the structural details of a wide range of biological and synthetic materials.

“I’m very interested in exploring the interface between science, art, and education, and I’m passionate about using 3D printing as a tool for the presentation of complex structures and processes in an easily understandable fashion,” Weaver said. “Traditional extrusion-based 3D printing can only produce solid objects with a continuous outer surface, and that’s problematic when trying to depict, gases, clouds, or other diffuse forms. Our approach uses an inkjet-like 3D printing process to deposit tiny individual droplets of opaque resin at precise locations within a surrounding volume of transparent resin to define the cloud’s form in exquisite detail.”

He noted that in the future the models could also incorporate additional information through the use of different colors to increase their scientific value. The researchers are also interested in exploring the use of 3D printing to represent observational data from nearby molecular clouds, such as those in the constellation Orion.

The models can also serve as valuable tools for education and public outreach, said Imara, who plans to use them in an astrophysics course she will be teaching this fall.

Astronomers create 3D-printed stellar nurseries

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