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School of Applied Social Sciences

MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice

Available as a part-time or full-time programme.

This exciting programme provides an in-depth, advanced level study of crime and criminal justice that can be applied across British, European, and international contexts. This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Addressing issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, crime in the night time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, punishment, policing, youth crime and justice,law enforcement and the use of new technologies students study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

L3KC09 Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc

code L3KC09
Degree MSc
Year of Entry 2015
Mode of study Part Time + Full Time
Duration 1 year
Location Durham City
Email sass.pgadmissions@durham.ac.uk
Telephone +44 (0)191 334 1505

Description

This programme critically addresses a range of key issues and debates relating to crime and the criminal justice system. Students have the opportunity to develop in-depth understanding of crime, deviance and criminal justice from critical theoretical, policy, legal, political and practical perspectives. Addressing issues of historical and contemporary concern such as terrorism, prostitution, legal and illegal drugs, crime in the night time economy, forced migration, gender and crime, domestic violence, crime prevention, punishment, policing, youth crime and justice, law enforcement and the use of new technologies students study issues of theoretical and social importance with lecturers who are international experts in their fields.

Course Structure

Students take a range of taught modules primarily in the first two terms of the academic year. Normally towards the conclusion of the second term, students undertake a module on research design which enables students to develop a research proposal for their dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Perspectives on Social Research
  • Research Design and Process
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

  • Crime, Violence and Abuse
  • Criminal Justice, Risk and Security: From the Local to the Global
  • The Sociology of Punishment
  • Issues in Criminal Justice
  • Cybercrime: Crime in the information age
  • Risk, security and society
  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning
  • Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science
  • Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science.

The MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice is a 1 year full-time programme which may also be taken part-time. The programme’s core consists of one 30 credit module on Criminological Theory, one 15 credit module on Theories of Social Research and one 15 credit module on Research Design. Students are also required to undertake 60 further credits of modules from within SASS or other related departments which may be taught in a variety of ways.

Core teaching on the programme falls primarily within the two 10 week terms, the second of which commences one week prior to the Undergraduate Term. Depending on module choice students may receive between 6 and 8 hours of tuition per week in either or both of these terms.

The programme is taught according to a variety of approaches. Modules such as ‘Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice’, ‘Crime, Violence and Abuse’, and ‘Criminal Justice Risk and Security’ operate a standard 2 hour session within which lecturing, seminar discussion, workshops or presentations may take place. Modules such as ‘Perspectives on Social Research’, ‘Quantitative Methods’ and ‘Qualitative Methods’ operate a weekly lecture series followed by seminar discussion. Other modules such as ‘Statistical Exploration and Reasoning’ operate computer-based practicals.

Following completion of teaching in terms 1 and 2, the ‘Research Design’ module allows for 4 day long workshops. Reflecting on the process of research design, the module supports the student in formulating the research question for their dissertation.

It is intended that the programme is research led at its core. The compulsory module 'Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice' links explicitly with the research activities of the criminology staff; the module ‘Crime Violence and Abuse’ links with the current research activities of the School’s research group of the same name. Students subsequently undertake a 60 credit dissertation supervised by staff actively researching in a relevant area. While this module is intended to afford an opportunity for a significant piece of independent and original research, it includes up to four hours of regular supervision which takes place typically from the end of term 2. Students will also participate in two one-hour workshops convened by their supervisor ideally with others researching in similar areas.

While teaching is intensive, particularly in terms 1 and 2, it is intended that the programme presents options for part-time study in order that the programme may be accessible as CPD to those working in related professions. Consequently, teaching is undertaken where possible in timetable slots which take place late in the afternoon.

Subjects required, level and graded

Normally an upper second class honours degree (2:1) or equivalent.

We are keen to consider applications from professional from a range of criminal justice backgrounds and experiences.

English Language requirements

IELTS of 7 or equivalent with no element less than 6.5

Requirements and Admissions

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply

The University accepts the following alternative English language tests and scores.

Information relevant to your country

www.durham.ac.uk/international/countryinfo

Fees

Fees shown are for one year. Total fee will depend on the length of your programme. All fees are subject to annual increases. For more information please visit the Tuition Fees page www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance/tuition

EU student fees

£6100

Home student fees

£6100

Islands student fees

£6100

International non-EU student fees

£14900

Scholarships and funding

www.durham.ac.uk/postgraduate/finance

Durham University are offering over 135 scholarships for Home/EU postgraduate taught students in the academic year 2015/16. Funded by Durham University and the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), we’re delighted to be part of a strategy to address under-representation within postgraduate education. These scholarships are part of the wider Postgraduate Support Scheme initiative.

The scholarships intend to support those students who wouldn’t otherwise consider postgraduate education. This may be because of financial barriers, personal caring commitments or because an applicant is domiciled in an area where progression to postgraduate education is less common.

Further information can be found here.

Durham University has a long history of sociological research into crime and justice which has recently lead to a major investment in the subject of criminology – both in relation to an expansion of scholars appointed at every level and the creation of new undergraduate and postgraduate degree programmes.

The programme is taught by members of the inter-disciplinary criminological research group at Durham. Funded by a wide range of research grants and consultancies, the group has a particular research strength in crime, violence and abuse, but also includes a strong portfolio of research into crime and technology, policing and penal issues. The research group supports and undertakes theoretical and applied research and includes a large and vibrant postgraduate research community. Studying with expert staff the programme provides a core focus on the discipline of Criminology whilst allowing students to pursue specialised areas of interest. The programme focuses upon understanding crime, its causes and prevention, criminal justice policy, and the links between crime and societal responses.

The programme commences in October of each year. The full-time programme lasts 12 months, and part time lasts at least 24 months.

Students will undertake four core modules in preparation for a supervised Dissertation. The core modules facilitate the advanced study of theories of crime and criminal justice, the acquisition of research skills and the synthesis of specialist knowledge and innovative criminological research methods in a dissertation. A range of further modules are available from which students will pick up to 60 credits of options. Optional modules are continually in development.

Core Modules

Theorising Crime and Criminal Justice

(30 credits)

  • Apply theories of crime and justice to topical issues
  • Theory and practice of criminal justice
  • Analysis of contemporary politics
  • Governance of criminal justice

Perspectives on Social Research

(15 credits)

  • Introduction to social scientific research
  • Establishing cause and interpreting meaning in social sciences
  • Essentials of quantitative and qualitative research in social science research

Research Design and Progress

(15 credits)

  • Formulating research questions
  • Ethical review procedures
  • Research proposal design, evaluation, and development
  • Conversational analysis in practice
  • Qualitative interviewing

Dissertation

(60 credits)

  • A dissertation of up to 15,000 words.

Optional Modules
(choose any combination of modules for a total of 60 credits)

Choose modules to the value of 60 credits,

listed at right

 (60 credits)

  • Crime Violence and Abuse (30 credits)
  • Criminal Justice, Risk and Security: from the Local to the Global (30 credits)
  • The Sociology of Punishment (30 credits)
  • Issues in Criminal Justice (30 credits)
  • Cybercrime: Crime in the Information Age (30 credits)
  • Risk, Security, and Society (30 credits)
  • Statistical Exploration and Reasoning (15 credits)
  • Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)
  • Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science (15 credits)

Dependent on module choice, academic learning is assessed through 3,000 word essays, workshops, self-assessment, oral presentations and research reports. There are no written timed examinations. 

Normally an upper second class honours degree or equivalent is required. 

International students also need to satisfy the general requirements for admissions which can be found by following this link: General Requirements for International Students.

If you studied for your degree in any language other than English, you must take, and pass an English language test. The University expects you to have an IELTS score of 7.0 with no element lower than 6.5 or equivalent. If you have not yet reached this standard, you may be offered a conditional place on the programme. The University's English Language Centre offers courses of between one and three months, starting in June each year, which are designed to help you study in English.

We welcome applications from holders of international qualifications.

You can apply for this course through the University's online application process here.