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Durham University

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News

Mapping our wasted heat

Have you ever thought about all the wasted heat that’s released into our atmosphere from large factories and power stations?

(17 Sep 2020) » More about Mapping our wasted heat


Zooming in on dark matter

Our cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe – which could help us find the real thing in space.

(2 Sep 2020) » More about Zooming in on dark matter


Rationing might be recommended for future pandemics

New research at the Business School has found that rationing could be an effective measure for governments to introduce in future pandemics. This is alongside a number of recommendations revealed by a pioneering forecasting model.

(1 Sep 2020) » More about Rationing might be recommended for future pandemics


Reporting the atomic bombs and VJ Day

In an era before the internet and smartphones the dropping of the atomic bombs and eventual surrender of Japan on VJ Day was reported in more traditional ways.

(14 Aug 2020) » More about Reporting the atomic bombs and VJ Day


Britain’s first Viking helmet discovered

A team from our Archaeology Department have been helping to uncover the past of a rare Viking artefact.

(10 Aug 2020) » More about Britain’s first Viking helmet discovered


Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis

Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis

Our scientists have found a new way to kill the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB).

(29 Jul 2020) » More about Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis


University spin-out wins prestigious award

A University spin out company been recognised for its pioneering work helping Network Rail to investigate hidden shafts and voids in its tunnels.

(24 Jul 2020) » More about University spin-out wins prestigious award


English speakers some of the least likely to wear face masks

Recent research by Professor Sascha Kraus suggests Brits, Americans and other English speakers are some of the least likely to wear face masks and social distance in the world. The only native speakers, researched by the academics, less likely to following health precautions are German speakers.

(17 Jul 2020) » More about English speakers some of the least likely to wear face masks


Galaxy evolution research among most cited of past decade

A supercomputer simulation carried out in Durham that realistically calculates the formation of galaxies from the Big Bang to the present day is one of cosmology’s most popular research papers of the past decade.

The EAGLE Project. Simulating the universe

(16 Jul 2020) » More about Galaxy evolution research among most cited of past decade


Revealing the atmospheric impact of planetary collisions

The atmospheric impact of gigantic planetary collisions

Giant impacts have a wide range of consequences for young planets and their atmospheres, according to research led by our scientists.

(15 Jul 2020) » More about Revealing the atmospheric impact of planetary collisions


Positive culture change in family firms

The impact of Covid-19 has forced a drastic positive culture change in family firms, creating stronger solidarity and cohesion within companies, plus increased digitalisation, according to new research at the School.

(10 Jul 2020) » More about Positive culture change in family firms


Baboons do not view researchers as neutral

Baboons who are used to researcher presence are less tolerant than we thought, according to a new study by our anthropologists.

(9 Jul 2020) » More about Baboons do not view researchers as neutral


Culture dictates how we cope with Covid-19 career impact

Whether we’re more concerned with our own career development or the success of the company is often determined by our culture, research at the School has revealed.

(3 Jul 2020) » More about Culture dictates how we cope with Covid-19 career impact


How we started a #womenintech revolution

Tech Up Women - How far we've come!

In 2019, we launched TechUPWomen, a programme that took 100 women from the north and midlands (UK) and retrained them for a career in technology.

(29 Jun 2020) » More about How we started a #womenintech revolution


Decarbonising heat research receives over £4 million in funding

We’ve won major funding for three new research projects to decarbonise heat which will significantly reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions.

(26 Jun 2020) » More about Decarbonising heat research receives over £4 million in funding


The Culture of Women in Tech

Dr Mariann Hardey has a new podcast episode out this week with New Books Network. The episode focuses around the culture of women in tech and Dr Hardey’s own experiences in this area.

(26 Jun 2020) » More about The Culture of Women in Tech


How water could trigger earthquakes and volcanoes

We’re investigating if water cycles deep in the Earth play a role in the triggering and strength of earthquakes and volcanoes.

(24 Jun 2020) » More about How water could trigger earthquakes and volcanoes


Testing cheaper than lockdown

Mass testing is the safest way to reopen the economy and society and will cost much less than a hard lockdown, research reveals.

 By Abderrahim Taamouti - June 2020

(22 Jun 2020) » More about Testing cheaper than lockdown


Why do we stare at ourselves on video calls?

Aarron Toal, PhD Candidate, explores why we stare at ourselves on video calls.

(22 Jun 2020) » More about Why do we stare at ourselves on video calls?


First space-based measurement of neutron lifetime

Our researchers have helped to find a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time.

(11 Jun 2020) » More about First space-based measurement of neutron lifetime


Black hole’s heart still beating

Black hole heartbeat graphic

The first confirmed heartbeat of a supermassive black hole is still going strong more than ten years after first being observed.

(10 Jun 2020) » More about Black hole’s heart still beating


Consumers post-Covid-19

Aarron Toal, from our Business School, explores what the future may hold for consumers after Covid-19.

(22 May 2020) » More about consumers post-Covid-19


Secrets of famous French painter revealed

The mystery behind a painting by a renowned French post-impressionist may have been revealed by new research that has unearthed secrets from his past.

(18 May 2020) » More about Secrets of famous French painter revealed


How will Covid-19 affect productivity in the UK?

Professor Richard Harris from our Business School uses the 2008-09 recession as a benchmark for assessing the possible impact of Covid-19 on productivity in the UK.

(12 May 2020) » More about how will Covid-19 affect productivity in the UK?


Largest amount of microplastics found on ocean floor

Our researchers have helped record the highest level of microplastics ever found on the ocean floor – with up to 1.9 million pieces in an area of just one square metre.

(30 Apr 2020) » More about Largest amount of microplastics found on ocean floor


Helium supplies at risk from plunging oil prices

Professor Jon Gluyas from our Durham Energy Institute explains why this is bad news for the coronavirus effort.

(28 Apr 2020) » More about helium supplies at risk from plunging oil prices


Literary expert honoured

One of our leading academics has been honoured for his contribution to the promotion of English literature.

(21 Apr 2020) » More about Literary expert honoured


Valuing ‘unskilled’ work

Dr Jo McBride from our Business School and Professor Miguel Martínez Lucio from the University of Manchester explain how Covid-19 is changing the way we value “unskilled” work in our society.

(8 Apr 2020) » More about valuing ‘unskilled’ work


The UK Government, businesses and unions are cooperating during Covid-19

Professor Bernd Brandl explains why it is vital that the UK Government, business groups and trade unions continue to cooperate as they tackle the impact of Covid-19.

(6 Apr 2020) » More about the UK Government, businesses and unions are cooperating during Covid-19


CO₂ emissions are plummeting – here’s how to keep them down

A positive result of the world’s response to Coronavirus, means that CO₂ emissions have been slashed. Professor Simone Abram looks at how we can maintain this environmental benefit.

(27 Mar 2020) » More about CO₂ emissions are plummeting – here’s how to keep them down


Dogs could join fight against Covid-19

New research will look into whether man’s best friend could play a role in preventing the spread of Coronavirus.

(27 Mar 2020) » More about dogs could join fight against Covid-19


The lockdown is a dangerous time for victims of domestic abuse

As the coronavirus lockdown continues in the UK and many other countries Professor Nicole Westmarland and Rosanna Bellini provide a guide on what we need to consider in relation to domestic abuse. 

(26 Mar 2020) » More about the lockdown is a dangerous time for victims of domestic abuse


How to build a universe

How to build a universe

How do you build a universe?

(19 Mar 2020) » More about How to build a universe


Five things to ‘dig’ about heritage at Durham

Our researchers are the history detectives, unearthing exciting things from our past and helping us learn from our ancestors.

(16 Mar 2020) » More about Five things to ‘dig’ about heritage at Durham


The origins of life on Earth challenged in new research

How did life on earth begin? There’s hardly a bigger question, but one of the most commonly held theories has been challenged by new research.

(11 Mar 2020) » More about The origins of life on Earth challenged in new research


Commemorating Basil Bunting and Briggflatts

Did you know that we’re home to the archives of one of Britain’s most distinguished modern poets?

Basil Bunting reading from 'Briggflatts'

(6 Mar 2020) » More about Commemorating Basil Bunting and Briggflatts


Durham welcomes Spanish Consul General

Our work to help bring the vast wealth of Spanish art and culture to the world has been marked by a visit from Spain’s Consul General.

(3 Mar 2020) » More about Durham welcomes Spanish Consul General


Education experts to advise Government

Three of our education experts have been appointed to a Cabinet Panel to help Government decide which policies work and which don’t.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about Education experts to advise Government


Global conservation priorities identified in new research

Environmental conditions, more than human activity, explain why some parts of the globe have more endangered species than others, according to new research.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about Global conservation priorities identified in new research


Monumental medieval chapel finally uncovered

Our archaeologists have helped uncover the remains of a long lost chapel from Britain’s medieval past.

(17 Feb 2020) » More about Monumental medieval chapel finally uncovered


Learning from nature to tackle global challenges

The solutions to some of the most pressing global challenges could be right under our noses, in the trees, plants and insects around us.

(12 Feb 2020) » More about Learning from nature to tackle global challenges


Rare Viking-age board game piece found

Our archaeologists have helped unearth a 1,200 year old board game piece on a small island off the coast of north east England.

(11 Feb 2020) » More about Rare Viking-age board game piece found


UK Government minister praises inspiring research and innovation at Durham

Universities Minister Chris Skidmore Visits Durham University

Our researchers are tackling some of the biggest challenges facing the world today, from improving soil health in Africa to working to prevent natural disasters in Southern Asia. So it was great to be able to show Chris Skidmore, the UK Government’s Universities Minister, some examples of our research and innovation in action.

(24 Jan 2020) » More about UK Government minister praises inspiring research and innovation at Durham


Unearthing Britain’s medieval past

Our archaeologists have unearthed the secrets of Britain’s most powerful bishops to teach us more about the country’s medieval past.

(21 Jan 2020) » More about Unearthing Britain’s medieval past


Five cool things about our Cosmology & Astronomy research

Revealing the true colours of quasars

Research at Durham isn’t just confined to life here on Earth.

(17 Dec 2019) » More about Five cool things about our Cosmology & Astronomy research


Sharing our 350-year-old library with the world

We’re proud to be home to the earliest public library in the North East of England, Cosin’s Library, established in 1669 by John Cosin, Bishop of Durham for the benefit of the local community.

(17 Dec 2019) » More about Sharing our 350-year-old library with the world


Enduring interest in the fate of the Scottish Soldiers

In the six years since we found a mass grave of 17th century prisoners on Durham University land, our Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project has captivated thousands of people across the world.

(16 Dec 2019) » More about Enduring interest in the fate of the Scottish Soldiers


Air pollution and the ethics of recommending facemasks

Record levels of air pollution have been measured in some parts of the world posing a danger to human health.

(27 Nov 2019) » More about Air pollution and the ethics of recommending facemasks


Five thousand eyes on the sky

A cutting-edge new telescope instrument designed and built by an international team including Durham University has taken its first observations of the night sky.

(18 Nov 2019) » More about Five thousand eyes on the sky


India’s National Academy of Sciences honours Durham researcher

One of our leading researchers is to be honoured by India’s oldest science academy.

(18 Nov 2019) » More about India’s National Academy of Sciences honours Durham researcher


National Energy Champion award for geothermal researcher

Research into the potential of using geothermal energy as a low-carbon heat source has won a national award for one of our leading researchers.

(13 Nov 2019) » More about National Energy Champion award for geothermal researcher


Is Planet 9 really a black hole?

Is there a black hole in our solar system?

(10 Oct 2019) » More about Is Planet 9 really a black hole?


Observing the Cosmic Web

Astronomers get detailed view of Cosmic Web

The Cosmic Web is believed to contain huge threads of gas that connect multiple galaxies across the universe.

(4 Oct 2019) » More about Observing the Cosmic Web


Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research

We’re leading a national research project to decarbonise transport through hydrogen-fuelled vehicles and technology.

(30 Sep 2019) » More about Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research


Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on East Antarctic Ice Sheet

More than 65,000 meltwater lakes have been discovered on the edge of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet by our researchers.

(25 Sep 2019) » More about Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on East Antarctic Ice Sheet


The heat beneath our feet

Old coal mines could provide us with a source of low-carbon heat for many years to come, according to geothermal energy expert Dr Charlotte Adams, who is the new President of the Geology section at the British Science Association.

Here, Charlotte, who is a member of our Durham Energy Institute, explains more about her research into how water stored in flooded abandoned mines could provide cleaner energy for homes and businesses.

(17 Sep 2019) » More about The heat beneath our feet


Developing cheaper and more efficient solar power

Our scientists have helped to solve a puzzle that could lead to cheaper and more efficient solar power.

(16 Sep 2019) » More about Developing cheaper and more efficient solar power


A new home for the archive of ‘Radical Jack’

Opening up the archives of Radical Jack

A political firebrand, a radical reformist and a leading society figure – the life and times of John George Lambton, first Earl of Durham, were truly captivating.

Durham University is now the new home to the archives of Lord Durham, as he was also known, whose energetic support for political reform earned him the nickname ‘Radical Jack’.

(30 Aug 2019) » More about A new home for the archive of ‘Radical Jack’


Smart surfaces as a solution to global challenges

Professor Jas Pal Badyal, a Fellow of the Royal Society, is widely considered a leader in the field of surface science. Here he talks about the students in his team, their inventions and tackling global challenges.

(22 Aug 2019) » More about smart surfaces as a solution to global challenges


Revealing quasars’ true colours

Revealing the true colours of quasars

Our astronomers have identified a rare moment in the life of some of the universe’s most energetic objects.

(7 Aug 2019) » More about Revealing quasars’ true colours


Malaysian Minister of Education visits Durham

The University has hosted a visit by the Malaysian Minister of Education to celebrate a new partnership that will see an important collection of diplomatic papers digitised for study in South East Asia.

(26 Jul 2019) » More about Malaysian Minister of Education visits Durham


Measuring the expanding universe

Our physicists will help create a 3D map of galaxies to learn more about the universe’s accelerating expansion.

(17 Jul 2019) » More about Measuring the expanding universe


Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity

Einstein’s theory of General Relativity is world famous – but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form.

(8 Jul 2019) » More about Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity


How a tiny bug inspires surfaces that don’t get wet

A tiny bug is the inspiration for research that could one day provide clean water or help ships sail more efficiently.

(5 Jul 2019) » More about How a tiny bug inspires surfaces that don’t get wet


Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction

Women in Nepal are having a say in how to reduce the risk of disasters like fires and landslides.

Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction

(3 Jul 2019) » More about Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction


Permanent headstone marks Scottish soldiers resting place

The headstone has been installed at the grave of the 17th Century Scottish soldiers buried in Durham City, providing a permanent marker of their resting place. 

(28 Jun 2019) » More about Permanent headstone marks Scottish soldiers resting place


Reducing the plastic mountain

Every single minute, a truck load of plastic ends up in our oceans, killing millions of animals every year. This is only going to get worse unless we do something about it.

How three students are trying to reduce the plastic mountain

(26 Jun 2019) » More about Reducing the plastic mountain


US military bigger polluter than most countries

Surprised by the headline? No wonder when discussions about greenhouse gas emissions tend to focus on statistics for countries, not institutions. But research from our Department of Geography, in partnership with Lancaster University, found that the US military’s carbon footprint is so big it out ranks that of most countries in the world.

(19 Jun 2019) » More about US military bigger polluter than most countries


A city that's more afraid of tigers than earthquakes

People living in one of Nepal’s biggest cities are more worried about attacks by tigers and rhinos than a repeat of the earthquake that caused devastation a little over four years ago.

(4 Jun 2019) » More about A city that's more afraid of tigers than earthquakes


From food flavourings to biofuels, metals are key

We all know that metals like iron and calcium are essential for a healthy body - but our pioneering scientists estimate that almost half of life’s processes depend upon various metals interacting with living cells.

(17 May 2019) » More about from food flavourings to biofuels, metals are key


Star award for dark matter research

A Durham astrophysicist has been named as a rising star of research and innovation for her work on the mysterious substance that makes up a large part of the universe.

(7 May 2019) » More about Star award for dark matter research


Students showcase research at Westminster

Our students have visited Parliament to show how technology normally used to explain the mysteries of the universe can create clearer X-ray images of humans.

(7 May 2019) » More about Students showcase research at Westminster


Online course brings Scottish soldiers project to the world

Durham University has launched an online archaeology course to give people around the world the chance to study one of its most captivating research projects, relating to the fate of the prisoners from the Battle of Dunbar in 1650.

(23 Apr 2019) » More about Online course brings Scottish soldiers project to the world


Saving coffee using space technology

We drink two billion cups of coffee every day – 95 million cups in the UK alone.

(29 Mar 2019) » More about Saving coffee using space technology


Improved housing in Africa could prevent disease

Housing in sub-Saharan Africa has dramatically improved and could help in the fight against diseases such as malaria.

(28 Mar 2019) » More about Improved housing in Africa could prevent disease


Ancient royal charter discovered in Durham

An ancient royal charter might not be what everyone expects to find when they come to work, but for one of our visiting fellows that’s exactly what happened.

(26 Mar 2019) » More about Ancient royal charter discovered in Durham


Making water more sustainable

Water is a precious and vital resource that is under threat from climate change and growing demands.

(21 Mar 2019) » More about Making water more sustainable


Plan to grow North’s chemicals sector

Did you know that the North of England’s research strengths in chemical and process industries could help to contribute more than £20billion to the UK economy over the next 20 years?

(18 Mar 2019) » More about Plan to grow North’s chemicals sector


Training the next generation of global problem solvers

Tropical diseases, water and food security, and flooding are some of the issues being tackled by our new training centre dedicated to global challenges.

(13 Mar 2019) » More about Training the next generation of global problem solvers


World top six ranking for space science

Durham University’s astrophysicists have been ranked joint sixth in the world for the quality and influence of their research in space science.

(19 Feb 2019) » More about World top six ranking for space science


Medieval thinking meets modern research

Image showing digital artwork of medieval understanding of the universe

Imagine being able to step back in time and see how a great mind of the past understood our world, or experience how food and drink tasted hundreds of years ago.

Well, research led by Durham University is allowing people to do just that. 

(15 Feb 2019) » More about Medieval thinking meets modern research


New PhD opportunities in science and engineering

Smart surfaces, recyclable plastics and new medicines are some of the subjects students will be able to study and research, thanks to a £5.3 million funding boost.

(5 Feb 2019) » More about New PhD opportunities in science and engineering


How surface science can solve big challenges

Did you know that more than a billion people in the world don’t have access to clean drinking water? And that the majority of mobile phones carried by doctors and nurses in hospitals carry infections?

(13 Dec 2018) » More about How surface science can solve big challenges


Fracking causes earthquakes by design: can regulation keep up?

Miles Wilson, PhD Candidate, Gillian Foulger and Jon Gluyas (all Department of Earth Sciences) and Richard Davies, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Engagement and Internationalisation, Newcastle University explain that fracking is intended to bring about the very process which results in earthquakes.

(9 Nov 2018) » More about Fracking causes earthquakes by design: can regulation keep up?


One million international visitors attend Walking with the Buddha Exhibition

Over the summer a Durham University team co-curated an exhibition with the Fo Guang Shan Buddha Museum in Taiwan, which was visited by one million people, from 25 different countries.

(19 Oct 2018) » More about one million international visitors attend Walking with the Buddha Exhibition


Astronomers identify far flung galaxies

Astronomers have captured a spectacular image of a massive galaxy cluster embedded among nearly thousands of previously unseen galaxies scattered across space and time.

Zooming onto the galaxy cluster Abell 370

(13 Sep 2018) » More about Astronomers identify far flung galaxies


Protecting against volcanic ash

A first of its kind study, led by Dr Claire Horwell of the Department of Earth Sciences and Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience, has found that industry-certified particle masks are most effective at protecting people from volcanic ash, whilst commonly used surgical masks offer less protection.

(11 Sep 2018) » More about Protecting against volcanic ash


Earthquake research could improve seismic forecasts

The timing and size of three deadly earthquakes that struck Italy in 2016 may have been pre-determined, according to new research that could improve future earthquake forecasts.

(23 Aug 2018) » More about Earthquake research could improve seismic forecasts


Physicists reveal oldest galaxies

Some of the faintest satellite galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way galaxy are amongst the very first that formed in our Universe, physicists have found.

(17 Aug 2018) » More about Physicists reveal oldest galaxies


Outstanding partnership helps reduce power outages

Durham University and NM Group Knowledge Transfer Partnership: Vegetation Analytics

Power outages caused by trees falling on power lines are being reduced as a result of a research partnership involving a Durham University Research Fellow and an international company.

(17 Jul 2018) » More about Outstanding partnership helps reduce power outages


European dogs wiped out ancient American breeds

The arrival of Europeans to the Americas, beginning in the 15th Century, all but wiped out the dogs that had lived alongside native people on the continent for thousands of years, according to new research published in Science.

(6 Jul 2018) » More about European dogs wiped out ancient American breeds


Archaeologists reveal castle’s medieval secrets

Medieval mysteries, hidden beneath the grounds of a 900-year-old British castle, have been uncovered during a major archaeological excavation.

(3 Jul 2018) » More about Archaeologists reveal castle’s medieval secrets


Cataclysmic collision shaped Uranus’ evolution

Uranus was hit by a massive object roughly twice the size of Earth that caused the planet to tilt and could explain its freezing temperatures, according to new research.

(3 Jul 2018) » More about Cataclysmic collision shaped Uranus’ evolution


Warning signs: how early humans first began to paint animals

Professor Paul Pettitt, from the Department of Archaeology and Derek Hodgson, University of York, explain why figurative art might derive from Neanderthal handprints.

(4 May 2018) » More about warning signs: how early humans first began to paint animals


We could use old coal mines to decarbonise heat – here's how

miner's hands holding a lump of coal

Dr Charlotte Adams from Geography and Durham Energy Institute Executive Director Professor Jon Gluyas believe that the UK's abandoned deep mines could meet our future energy needs.

(28 Nov 2017) » More about we could use old coal mines to decarbonise heat – here's how


Why the US withdrawal from UNESCO is a step backwards for global cultural cooperation

Professor Robin Coningham, UNESCO Chair on Archaeological Ethics and Practice in Cultural Heritage, explains why this will result in few benefits.

(19 Oct 2017) » More about why the US withdrawal from UNESCO is a step backwards for global cultural cooperation


Reformation Rebels: The surprising histories of Benedictine monks in exile

Monks in Motion

Sixteenth and seventeenth century Benedictine monks refused abstinence, died in duels, went off to war and spread illegal Catholic doctrine, a new study has revealed.

(31 Aug 2017) » More about Reformation Rebels: The surprising histories of Benedictine monks in exile


Durham scientists play key role as construction starts on world’s largest telescope

Construction work has begun on the world’s largest visible to infrared telescope – and Durham University is playing a key role.

The Extremely Large Telescope (ELT)

(20 Jul 2017) » More about Durham scientists play key role as construction starts on world’s largest telescope


Exploring geothermal energy potential

Researchers at the University’s Durham Energy Institute (DEI) are exploring the Earth’s geothermal energy potential

(4 Jul 2017) » More about Exploring geothermal energy potential


Little Cub gives astronomers rare chance to see galaxy demise

A primitive galaxy that could provide clues about the early Universe has been spotted by astronomers as it begins to be consumed by a gigantic neighbouring galaxy.

(4 Jul 2017) » More about Little Cub gives astronomers rare chance to see galaxy demise


Pioneering work in chemistry receives prestigious recognition

Professor Jas Pal Badyal FRS from Durham University has been named as the Royal Society of Chemistry Tilden Prize winner for 2017 for his pioneering work on the functionalization of solid surfaces and deposition of nanocoatings.

(9 May 2017) » More about pioneering work in chemistry receives prestigious recognition


Durham enters partnership with iconic Palace Museum

Durham University and China’s Palace Museum have signed an agreement, bringing together these two world-renowned centres of research and cultural excellence for the first time. The agreement, which is the first between the Palace Museum and an English university, builds on Durham University’s already strong links with China

(7 Dec 2016) » More about Durham enters partnership with iconic Palace Museum