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Durham University

Research & business

News

News

Astronomers apply their skills to cancer research

You might not think that studying the universe could benefit research into serious illnesses like cancer, but Durham’s astronomers have joined forces with cancer researchers to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

(6 Jun 2021) » More about Astronomers apply their skills to cancer research


Can the height of your house reduce malaria?

mosquito

Whilst we think of the home as a sanctuary, in Africa, around 80% of malaria bites occur indoors at night. Preventing mosquitoes from getting indoors is a simple way of protecting people from this often lethal disease.

(26 May 2021) » More about Can the height of your house reduce malaria?


Mapping the universe in 3D

We’ve helped design and build a new telescope instrument that aims to create the most extensive 3D map of the universe ever attempted.

(17 May 2021) » More about Mapping the universe in 3D


Inspiring the next generation of space scientists

We’re inspiring the next generation of astronomers and cosmologists to aim for the stars!

(14 May 2021) » More about Inspiring the next generation of space scientists


Supporting business through astronomy

Durham’s astronomers and cosmologists are increasingly sharing their knowledge and expertise to support business.

(13 May 2021) » More about Supporting business through astronomy


Furthering the exploration of space

Durham’s researchers are helping to build some of the world’s most powerful new telescopes to further our exploration of space.

(12 May 2021) » More about Furthering the exploration of space


A bus journey to the stars!

Dr David Rosario is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in our Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics. An Indian national, born and brought up in Qatar, he lived and worked in the USA and Germany before joining Durham in 2015. Here he tells how a short bus journey began a long-lasting relationship with Durham University.

Astronomy and Cosmology at Durham – Dr David Rosario

(11 May 2021) » More about A bus journey to the stars!


Building a universe in a supercomputer

You can’t physically crash a planet into another planet in a lab to see what happens or look quite far enough back in time to see how the universe might have formed. So what do you do?

The EAGLE Project. Simulating the universe

(11 May 2021) » More about Building a universe in a supercomputer


How giant radio telescopes will tell us more about black holes

Dr Leah Morabito, in our Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, is a leading figure in two international radio telescope projects that will help us see more of the universe and give us new insight into distant galaxies and black holes. Find out more about Leah’s story.

(11 May 2021) » More about How giant radio telescopes will tell us more about black holes


Impacting life on Earth

Our Astronomy and Cosmology research is having an impact on life here on Earth.

(11 May 2021) » More about Impacting life on Earth


A world leader in Astronomy and Cosmology

Astronomy and Cosmology at Durham University

We’re a world leader in Astronomy and Cosmology and our students are taught by some of the best researchers in their field.

(10 May 2021) » More about A world leader in Astronomy and Cosmology


At the forefront of space research

We’re at the forefront of research that is furthering our understanding of the universe and the exploration of space.

(10 May 2021) » More about At the forefront of space research


Climate change and wildlife conservation across the Americas

flying flamingos

A continental-scale network of conservation sites is likely to remain effective under future climate change scenarios, despite a predicted shift in key species distributions.

(4 May 2021) » More about Climate change and wildlife conservation across the Americas


Award for next generation science leaders

We’ve benefited from a share of £5.7m in funding to support the next generation of science leaders to research the evolution of stars and the decay of subatomic particles.

(27 Apr 2021) » More about Award for next generation science leaders


Black holes to dark matter – an evolving universe

From supermassive black holes to the hunt for dark matter, Durham’s scientists are at the forefront of investigations into the evolution of the universe.

(23 Apr 2021) » More about Black holes to dark matter – an evolving universe


Durham among first to use Hubble successor

Durham’s astronomers are playing a key role in the biggest scientific programme to be carried out on the new successor to the Hubble Space Telescope.

(19 Apr 2021) » More about Durham among first to use Hubble successor


Melting ice sheets caused sea levels to rise up to 18 metres

an iceberg

Research led by our geography department has found that previous ice loss events caused sea-levels to rise around 3.6 metres per century, offering vital clues as to what lies ahead should climate change continue.

(8 Apr 2021) » More about Melting ice sheets caused sea levels to rise up to 18 metres


Medieval parchment worn as ‘birthing girdle’ during labour

medieval parchment

A 500-year-old parchment birthing girdle could give us more insight into childbirth for medieval mothers.

(12 Mar 2021) » More about Medieval parchment worn as ‘birthing girdle’ during labour


Testing regularly, staying safe and protecting others

Since January, our students and staff have taken over 5,000 lateral Flow Tests, and our pioneering testing programme is continuing to help stop the spread of Covid-19, protecting our University and local community.

(22 Feb 2021) » More about Testing regularly, staying safe and protecting others


Starry night or black holes?

Our astronomers have helped make a huge map of the night sky showing more than 25,000 active supermassive black holes in distant galaxies.

(19 Feb 2021) » More about Starry night or black holes?


Lockdown sees increased demand for male domestic abuse support

Man looking out window

New research by our Department of Sociology shows that calls for help from male domestic abuse victims have rocketed during lockdown and, behind closed doors, many are facing challenges that will continue long after social isolation ends.

(9 Feb 2021) » More about Lockdown sees increased demand for male domestic abuse support


Did dogs join us in settling the Americas?

Siberian husky

Dogs are regarded as our best friend and now our researchers say the first people to settle in the Americas brought their canines with them.

(26 Jan 2021) » More about Did dogs join us in settling the Americas?


Ancient DNA reveals secrets of Game of Thrones wolves

For fans of the TV show Game of Thrones, dire wolves are often seen as mysterious iconic legends.

(13 Jan 2021) » More about Ancient DNA reveals secrets of Game of Thrones wolves


Galaxy mergers could limit star formation

Our astronomers have looked nine billion years into the past to find evidence that galaxy mergers in the early universe could shut down star formation and affect galaxy growth.

(11 Jan 2021) » More about Galaxy mergers could limit star formation


Durham honours inspirational physicist

We are saddened to hear of the death of Professor Sir Arnold Wolfendale, one of the finest physicists of his generation and an inspirational teacher to generations of our students.

(4 Jan 2021) » More about Durham honours inspirational physicist


How our brains help us find misplaced objects

Have you ever wondered how we remember the last place we saw our car keys or other objects like mobile phones and glasses?

(21 Dec 2020) » More about How our brains help us find misplaced objects


Unlocking the mystery of the Moon’s formation

Supercomputer simulations could unlock mystery of Moon’s formation

We’re using supercomputer simulations to see how the Moon might have formed following a huge collision involving the early Earth 4.5 billion years ago.

(4 Dec 2020) » More about Unlocking the mystery of the Moon’s formation


Heating our homes with hydrogen

Gas pipe

Our research is supporting a new project that could see hydrogen become the future heat source for homes and provide green energy to industry.

(2 Dec 2020) » More about Heating our homes with hydrogen


Durham researchers named among best in world

Four of our professors have been named among the world’s best for the quality and influence of their work, highlighting the global strength of Durham’s research.

(20 Nov 2020) » More about Durham researchers named among best in world


Easier way to create biodiesel developed

Our researchers have developed a new way to turn the rubbish we throw away into chemicals that can help make fuel, medicines, fertilisers and biodegradable packaging.

(4 Nov 2020) » More about Easier way to create biodiesel developed


Covid-19 technologies must be regulated

Technologies such as track and trace apps, used to halt the spread of Covid-19, have to be thoroughly examined and regulated before they are rolled out for wider adoption to ensure they do not normalise a big-brother-like society post-Covid-19, according to Dr Jeremy Aroles.

(2 Nov 2020) » More about Covid-19 technologies must be regulated


Tackling floods and water waste

Flood warning sign on flooded road

We need to look to nature for help so new homes are resilient to climate change according to a new report to MPs and policymakers.

(20 Oct 2020) » More about Tackling floods and water waste


Psychotic, Incompetent, Greedy or Heroic?

Which boss are you?

An exploration into how popular fiction has shaped modern business management styles has been published this week, by Dr Martyn Griffin of the Business School.

(19 Oct 2020) » More about Psychotic, Incompetent, Greedy or Heroic?


Insects provide strategy for sustainable food production

Did you know that each year 1.3billion tonnes of food are wasted? 

(15 Oct 2020) » More about Insects provide strategy for sustainable food production


Changing attitudes to soil health

Hands holding soil

Future generations need to be educated about the crucial role that healthy soil plays in tackling climate change, according to new research.

(14 Oct 2020) » More about Changing attitudes to soil health


Covid-19 testing needed in schools

Daily Covid-19 testing in schools would keep children in full-time education safe, stop mass spread, and keep the economy afloat, according to Professor Abderrahim Taamouti.

(7 Oct 2020) » More about Covid-19 testing needed in schools


Investigating the impact of planet collisions

Did you know that Earth could have lost anywhere between 10 and 60 per cent of its atmosphere in the collision that is thought to have formed the Moon?

(30 Sep 2020) » More about Investigating the impact of planet collisions


Nobel class cosmology researcher honoured

A world-leading Durham cosmologist has been recognised as being “of Nobel class” for his work on the evolution of the universe.

(23 Sep 2020) » More about Nobel class cosmology researcher honoured


Mapping our wasted heat

Have you ever thought about all the wasted heat that’s released into our atmosphere from large factories and power stations?

(17 Sep 2020) » More about Mapping our wasted heat


Zooming in on dark matter

Our cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe – which could help us find the real thing in space.

(2 Sep 2020) » More about Zooming in on dark matter


Rationing might be recommended for future pandemics

New research at the Business School has found that rationing could be an effective measure for governments to introduce in future pandemics. This is alongside a number of recommendations revealed by a pioneering forecasting model.

(1 Sep 2020) » More about Rationing might be recommended for future pandemics


Reporting the atomic bombs and VJ Day

In an era before the internet and smartphones the dropping of the atomic bombs and eventual surrender of Japan on VJ Day was reported in more traditional ways.

(14 Aug 2020) » More about Reporting the atomic bombs and VJ Day


Britain’s first Viking helmet discovered

A team from our Archaeology Department have been helping to uncover the past of a rare Viking artefact.

(10 Aug 2020) » More about Britain’s first Viking helmet discovered


Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis

Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis

Our scientists have found a new way to kill the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB).

(29 Jul 2020) » More about Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis


University spin-out wins prestigious award

A University spin out company been recognised for its pioneering work helping Network Rail to investigate hidden shafts and voids in its tunnels.

(24 Jul 2020) » More about University spin-out wins prestigious award


English speakers some of the least likely to wear face masks

Recent research by Professor Sascha Kraus suggests Brits, Americans and other English speakers are some of the least likely to wear face masks and social distance in the world. The only native speakers, researched by the academics, less likely to following health precautions are German speakers.

(17 Jul 2020) » More about English speakers some of the least likely to wear face masks


Galaxy evolution research among most cited of past decade

A supercomputer simulation carried out in Durham that realistically calculates the formation of galaxies from the Big Bang to the present day is one of cosmology’s most popular research papers of the past decade.

The EAGLE Project. Simulating the universe

(16 Jul 2020) » More about Galaxy evolution research among most cited of past decade


Revealing the atmospheric impact of planetary collisions

The atmospheric impact of gigantic planetary collisions

Giant impacts have a wide range of consequences for young planets and their atmospheres, according to research led by our scientists.

(15 Jul 2020) » More about Revealing the atmospheric impact of planetary collisions


Positive culture change in family firms

The impact of Covid-19 has forced a drastic positive culture change in family firms, creating stronger solidarity and cohesion within companies, plus increased digitalisation, according to new research at the School.

(10 Jul 2020) » More about Positive culture change in family firms


Baboons do not view researchers as neutral

Baboons who are used to researcher presence are less tolerant than we thought, according to a new study by our anthropologists.

(9 Jul 2020) » More about Baboons do not view researchers as neutral


Culture dictates how we cope with Covid-19 career impact

Whether we’re more concerned with our own career development or the success of the company is often determined by our culture, research at the School has revealed.

(3 Jul 2020) » More about Culture dictates how we cope with Covid-19 career impact


How we started a #womenintech revolution

Tech Up Women - How far we've come!

In 2019, we launched TechUPWomen, a programme that took 100 women from the north and midlands (UK) and retrained them for a career in technology.

(29 Jun 2020) » More about How we started a #womenintech revolution


Decarbonising heat research receives over £4 million in funding

We’ve won major funding for three new research projects to decarbonise heat which will significantly reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions.

(26 Jun 2020) » More about Decarbonising heat research receives over £4 million in funding


The Culture of Women in Tech

Dr Mariann Hardey has a new podcast episode out this week with New Books Network. The episode focuses around the culture of women in tech and Dr Hardey’s own experiences in this area.

(26 Jun 2020) » More about The Culture of Women in Tech


How water could trigger earthquakes and volcanoes

We’re investigating if water cycles deep in the Earth play a role in the triggering and strength of earthquakes and volcanoes.

(24 Jun 2020) » More about How water could trigger earthquakes and volcanoes


Testing cheaper than lockdown

Mass testing is the safest way to reopen the economy and society and will cost much less than a hard lockdown, research reveals.

 By Abderrahim Taamouti - June 2020

(22 Jun 2020) » More about Testing cheaper than lockdown


Why do we stare at ourselves on video calls?

Aarron Toal, PhD Candidate, explores why we stare at ourselves on video calls.

(22 Jun 2020) » More about Why do we stare at ourselves on video calls?


First space-based measurement of neutron lifetime

Our researchers have helped to find a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time.

(11 Jun 2020) » More about First space-based measurement of neutron lifetime


Black hole’s heart still beating

Black hole heartbeat graphic

The first confirmed heartbeat of a supermassive black hole is still going strong more than ten years after first being observed.

(10 Jun 2020) » More about Black hole’s heart still beating


Consumers post-Covid-19

Aarron Toal, from our Business School, explores what the future may hold for consumers after Covid-19.

(22 May 2020) » More about consumers post-Covid-19


Secrets of famous French painter revealed

The mystery behind a painting by a renowned French post-impressionist may have been revealed by new research that has unearthed secrets from his past.

(18 May 2020) » More about Secrets of famous French painter revealed


How will Covid-19 affect productivity in the UK?

Professor Richard Harris from our Business School uses the 2008-09 recession as a benchmark for assessing the possible impact of Covid-19 on productivity in the UK.

(12 May 2020) » More about how will Covid-19 affect productivity in the UK?


Largest amount of microplastics found on ocean floor

Our researchers have helped record the highest level of microplastics ever found on the ocean floor – with up to 1.9 million pieces in an area of just one square metre.

(30 Apr 2020) » More about Largest amount of microplastics found on ocean floor


Helium supplies at risk from plunging oil prices

Professor Jon Gluyas from our Durham Energy Institute explains why this is bad news for the coronavirus effort.

(28 Apr 2020) » More about helium supplies at risk from plunging oil prices


Literary expert honoured

One of our leading academics has been honoured for his contribution to the promotion of English literature.

(21 Apr 2020) » More about Literary expert honoured


Valuing ‘unskilled’ work

Dr Jo McBride from our Business School and Professor Miguel Martínez Lucio from the University of Manchester explain how Covid-19 is changing the way we value “unskilled” work in our society.

(8 Apr 2020) » More about valuing ‘unskilled’ work


The UK Government, businesses and unions are cooperating during Covid-19

Professor Bernd Brandl explains why it is vital that the UK Government, business groups and trade unions continue to cooperate as they tackle the impact of Covid-19.

(6 Apr 2020) » More about the UK Government, businesses and unions are cooperating during Covid-19


CO₂ emissions are plummeting – here’s how to keep them down

A positive result of the world’s response to Coronavirus, means that CO₂ emissions have been slashed. Professor Simone Abram looks at how we can maintain this environmental benefit.

(27 Mar 2020) » More about CO₂ emissions are plummeting – here’s how to keep them down


Dogs could join fight against Covid-19

New research will look into whether man’s best friend could play a role in preventing the spread of Coronavirus.

(27 Mar 2020) » More about dogs could join fight against Covid-19


The lockdown is a dangerous time for victims of domestic abuse

As the coronavirus lockdown continues in the UK and many other countries Professor Nicole Westmarland and Rosanna Bellini provide a guide on what we need to consider in relation to domestic abuse. 

(26 Mar 2020) » More about the lockdown is a dangerous time for victims of domestic abuse


How to build a universe

How to build a universe

How do you build a universe?

(19 Mar 2020) » More about How to build a universe


Five things to ‘dig’ about heritage at Durham

Our researchers are the history detectives, unearthing exciting things from our past and helping us learn from our ancestors.

(16 Mar 2020) » More about Five things to ‘dig’ about heritage at Durham


The origins of life on Earth challenged in new research

How did life on earth begin? There’s hardly a bigger question, but one of the most commonly held theories has been challenged by new research.

(11 Mar 2020) » More about The origins of life on Earth challenged in new research


Commemorating Basil Bunting and Briggflatts

Did you know that we’re home to the archives of one of Britain’s most distinguished modern poets?

Basil Bunting reading from 'Briggflatts'

(6 Mar 2020) » More about Commemorating Basil Bunting and Briggflatts


Durham welcomes Spanish Consul General

Our work to help bring the vast wealth of Spanish art and culture to the world has been marked by a visit from Spain’s Consul General.

(3 Mar 2020) » More about Durham welcomes Spanish Consul General


Education experts to advise Government

Three of our education experts have been appointed to a Cabinet Panel to help Government decide which policies work and which don’t.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about Education experts to advise Government


Global conservation priorities identified in new research

Environmental conditions, more than human activity, explain why some parts of the globe have more endangered species than others, according to new research.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about Global conservation priorities identified in new research


Monumental medieval chapel finally uncovered

Our archaeologists have helped uncover the remains of a long lost chapel from Britain’s medieval past.

(17 Feb 2020) » More about Monumental medieval chapel finally uncovered


Rare Viking-age board game piece found

Our archaeologists have helped unearth a 1,200 year old board game piece on a small island off the coast of north east England.

(11 Feb 2020) » More about Rare Viking-age board game piece found


Five cool things about our Cosmology & Astronomy research

Revealing the true colours of quasars

Research at Durham isn’t just confined to life here on Earth.

(17 Dec 2019) » More about Five cool things about our Cosmology & Astronomy research


Sharing our 350-year-old library with the world

We’re proud to be home to the earliest public library in the North East of England, Cosin’s Library, established in 1669 by John Cosin, Bishop of Durham for the benefit of the local community.

(17 Dec 2019) » More about Sharing our 350-year-old library with the world


Enduring interest in the fate of the Scottish Soldiers

In the six years since we found a mass grave of 17th century prisoners on Durham University land, our Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project has captivated thousands of people across the world.

(16 Dec 2019) » More about Enduring interest in the fate of the Scottish Soldiers


Air pollution and the ethics of recommending facemasks

Record levels of air pollution have been measured in some parts of the world posing a danger to human health.

(27 Nov 2019) » More about Air pollution and the ethics of recommending facemasks


Five thousand eyes on the sky

A cutting-edge new telescope instrument designed and built by an international team including Durham University has taken its first observations of the night sky.

(18 Nov 2019) » More about Five thousand eyes on the sky


India’s National Academy of Sciences honours Durham researcher

One of our leading researchers is to be honoured by India’s oldest science academy.

(18 Nov 2019) » More about India’s National Academy of Sciences honours Durham researcher


National Energy Champion award for geothermal researcher

Research into the potential of using geothermal energy as a low-carbon heat source has won a national award for one of our leading researchers.

(13 Nov 2019) » More about National Energy Champion award for geothermal researcher


Is Planet 9 really a black hole?

Is there a black hole in our solar system?

(10 Oct 2019) » More about Is Planet 9 really a black hole?


Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research

We’re leading a national research project to decarbonise transport through hydrogen-fuelled vehicles and technology.

(30 Sep 2019) » More about Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research


Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on East Antarctic Ice Sheet

More than 65,000 meltwater lakes have been discovered on the edge of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet by our researchers.

(25 Sep 2019) » More about Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on East Antarctic Ice Sheet


The heat beneath our feet

Old coal mines could provide us with a source of low-carbon heat for many years to come, according to geothermal energy expert Dr Charlotte Adams, who is the new President of the Geology section at the British Science Association.

Here, Charlotte, who is a member of our Durham Energy Institute, explains more about her research into how water stored in flooded abandoned mines could provide cleaner energy for homes and businesses.

(17 Sep 2019) » More about The heat beneath our feet


A new home for the archive of ‘Radical Jack’

Opening up the archives of Radical Jack

A political firebrand, a radical reformist and a leading society figure – the life and times of John George Lambton, first Earl of Durham, were truly captivating.

Durham University is now the new home to the archives of Lord Durham, as he was also known, whose energetic support for political reform earned him the nickname ‘Radical Jack’.

(30 Aug 2019) » More about A new home for the archive of ‘Radical Jack’


Smart surfaces as a solution to global challenges

Professor Jas Pal Badyal, a Fellow of the Royal Society, is widely considered a leader in the field of surface science. Here he talks about the students in his team, their inventions and tackling global challenges.

(22 Aug 2019) » More about smart surfaces as a solution to global challenges


Revealing quasars’ true colours

Revealing the true colours of quasars

Our astronomers have identified a rare moment in the life of some of the universe’s most energetic objects.

(7 Aug 2019) » More about Revealing quasars’ true colours


Malaysian Minister of Education visits Durham

The University has hosted a visit by the Malaysian Minister of Education to celebrate a new partnership that will see an important collection of diplomatic papers digitised for study in South East Asia.

(26 Jul 2019) » More about Malaysian Minister of Education visits Durham


Measuring the expanding universe

Our physicists will help create a 3D map of galaxies to learn more about the universe’s accelerating expansion.

(17 Jul 2019) » More about Measuring the expanding universe


Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity

Einstein’s theory of General Relativity is world famous – but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form.

(8 Jul 2019) » More about Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity


How a tiny bug inspires surfaces that don’t get wet

A tiny bug is the inspiration for research that could one day provide clean water or help ships sail more efficiently.

(5 Jul 2019) » More about How a tiny bug inspires surfaces that don’t get wet


Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction

Women in Nepal are having a say in how to reduce the risk of disasters like fires and landslides.

Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction

(3 Jul 2019) » More about Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction


Permanent headstone marks Scottish soldiers resting place

The headstone has been installed at the grave of the 17th Century Scottish soldiers buried in Durham City, providing a permanent marker of their resting place. 

(28 Jun 2019) » More about Permanent headstone marks Scottish soldiers resting place


Reducing the plastic mountain

Every single minute, a truck load of plastic ends up in our oceans, killing millions of animals every year. This is only going to get worse unless we do something about it.

How three students are trying to reduce the plastic mountain

(26 Jun 2019) » More about Reducing the plastic mountain


US military bigger polluter than most countries

Surprised by the headline? No wonder when discussions about greenhouse gas emissions tend to focus on statistics for countries, not institutions. But research from our Department of Geography, in partnership with Lancaster University, found that the US military’s carbon footprint is so big it out ranks that of most countries in the world.

(19 Jun 2019) » More about US military bigger polluter than most countries


Students showcase research at Westminster

Our students have visited Parliament to show how technology normally used to explain the mysteries of the universe can create clearer X-ray images of humans.

(7 May 2019) » More about Students showcase research at Westminster


New PhD opportunities in science and engineering

Smart surfaces, recyclable plastics and new medicines are some of the subjects students will be able to study and research, thanks to a £5.3 million funding boost.

(5 Feb 2019) » More about New PhD opportunities in science and engineering


Warning signs: how early humans first began to paint animals

Professor Paul Pettitt, from the Department of Archaeology and Derek Hodgson, University of York, explain why figurative art might derive from Neanderthal handprints.

(4 May 2018) » More about warning signs: how early humans first began to paint animals


We could use old coal mines to decarbonise heat – here's how

miner's hands holding a lump of coal

Dr Charlotte Adams from Geography and Durham Energy Institute Executive Director Professor Jon Gluyas believe that the UK's abandoned deep mines could meet our future energy needs.

(28 Nov 2017) » More about we could use old coal mines to decarbonise heat – here's how


Why the US withdrawal from UNESCO is a step backwards for global cultural cooperation

Professor Robin Coningham, UNESCO Chair on Archaeological Ethics and Practice in Cultural Heritage, explains why this will result in few benefits.

(19 Oct 2017) » More about why the US withdrawal from UNESCO is a step backwards for global cultural cooperation


Reformation Rebels: The surprising histories of Benedictine monks in exile

Monks in Motion

Sixteenth and seventeenth century Benedictine monks refused abstinence, died in duels, went off to war and spread illegal Catholic doctrine, a new study has revealed.

(31 Aug 2017) » More about Reformation Rebels: The surprising histories of Benedictine monks in exile


Pioneering work in chemistry receives prestigious recognition

Professor Jas Pal Badyal FRS from Durham University has been named as the Royal Society of Chemistry Tilden Prize winner for 2017 for his pioneering work on the functionalization of solid surfaces and deposition of nanocoatings.

(9 May 2017) » More about pioneering work in chemistry receives prestigious recognition


Durham enters partnership with iconic Palace Museum

Durham University and China’s Palace Museum have signed an agreement, bringing together these two world-renowned centres of research and cultural excellence for the first time. The agreement, which is the first between the Palace Museum and an English university, builds on Durham University’s already strong links with China

(7 Dec 2016) » More about Durham enters partnership with iconic Palace Museum