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Durham University

Research & business

Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research

(30 September 2019)

We’re leading a national research project to decarbonise transport through hydrogen-fuelled vehicles and technology.

Durham will head up the £1million Network-H2 project working with Government, industry and other universities.

Climate change

Road, rail, air and marine transport accounts for almost a quarter of Europe’s greenhouse gas emissions making it a significant contributor to climate change.

Hydrogen offers a clean and renewable alternative to fossil fuels and can bring significant environmental benefits to transport, society and the wider energy system.

Hydrogen-powered vehicles only produce heat and water.

Renewable electricity

Hydrogen can also be made from a variety of domestic resources, such as natural gas, nuclear power and biomass as well as renewable electricity sources like solar and wind energy.

Network-H2 will bring together international experts from the energy, road, rail, air and marine transport sectors to support the decarbonisation of the whole transport network.

Net-zero carbon emissions

It will look at the technological, social, political and economic factors necessary to increase the use of hydrogen as fuel and knowledge exchange between researchers and industry.

Developing sustainable alternatives to the fuels we currently use for the UK’s transport system is crucial if we are going to achieve net-zero carbon emissions in the next 20-30 years.

Find out More

Tony Roskilly, Professor of Energy Systems in our Department of Engineering is Director of Network-H2.

The network is funded by the UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

The EPSRC has provided £5million in funding to five Decarbonising Transport Networks+.

Undergraduate and Postgraduate study in Engineering.

Energy & Clean Growth research at Durham.

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