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Research

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Research aims to “unpack Brexit”

Researchers at Durham University are aiming to unpack the issues behind the legal, constitutional and economic implications of Brexit.

(29 Nov 2016) » More about Research aims to “unpack Brexit”


Understanding the dynamics of an avalanche

SLF Avalanche Experiment 2015 - Clip 2A

Professor Jim McElwaine of the Department of Earth Sciences talks about new research, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, which has given some of the first detailed measurements of what takes place inside an avalanche. 

(25 Nov 2016) » More about Understanding the dynamics of an avalanche


Hurricane risk to Northeast USA coast increasing

The Northeastern coast of the USA could be struck by more frequent and more powerful hurricanes in the future due to shifting weather patterns, according to new research.

Hurricane risk to Northeast USA coast increasing, research warns

(23 Nov 2016) » More about Hurricane risk to Northeast USA coast increasing


Global science research partnerships praised

Durham University has been ranked in the top 25 in the world for its strong global research partnerships in a prestigious Nature Index.

Simulating a Universe: the EAGLE Project at Durham University

(17 Nov 2016) » More about Global science research partnerships praised


Enthusiasm for high school music

Making a positive primary to secondary transition in Music HD

Pupils’ enthusiasm for school music lessons drops significantly during the first year of secondary school, according to new research.

(11 Nov 2016) » More about enthusiasm for high school music


Classical Indian music meets modern technology with new app

An innovative new iPad app has been created to bring classical Indian music to a new audience. 

(3 Nov 2016) » More about Classical Indian music meets modern technology with new app


Why some songs get stuck in your head

Almost all of us get songs stuck in our heads from time to time but why do certain tunes have the ‘stick factor’?

The first large-scale study, led by Dr Kelly Jakubowski at Durham University, may have some answers to this musical stickiness. 

(3 Nov 2016) » More about Why some songs get stuck in your head


Solar car to exhibit at UN Climate Change Conference

A car designed and built by Durham University students and powered only by the sun is taking to the global stage.

DUEM Kickstarter Campaign 2016

(2 Nov 2016) » More about Solar car to exhibit at UN Climate Change Conference


New partnership for transformative research

Durham University has announced a new strategic partnership with the Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) which could transform the way research is developed into marketable products in industries including health and personal care.

(18 Oct 2016) » More about New partnership for transformative research


Research takes centre stage

Records of Early English Drama-North East: Uncovering performance and musical heritage

From giant dragons to dances with Death, medieval and Renaissance times were rich in performance, drama, plays and rituals. 

(7 Oct 2016) » More about research takes centre stage


International centre for research into Spanish & Latin American art announced

Image Vice-Chancellor Stuart Corbridge and Jonathan Ruffer, Auckland Castle Trust

Durham University is helping to establish a corner of North East England as an international centre for research into Spanish and Latin American art and culture.

(29 Sep 2016) » More about International centre for research into Spanish & Latin American art announced


Rest and well-being – world’s largest survey

Over two thirds (68 per cent) of the public would like more rest, according to the world’s largest ever survey on the topic.

(27 Sep 2016) » More about rest and well-being – world’s largest survey


Research reveals pain and pleasure of sad music

Sad music can provide enjoyment, comfort or pain to different people, according to new research looking at the effects of melancholy songs on the emotions.

(15 Jun 2016) » More about research reveals pain and pleasure of sad music


Durham rises in prestigious world rankings

The number of Durham University subjects in the top 50 of the prestigious QS World University Subject Rankings has more than doubled from three to seven.

Geography at Durham is ranked third in the world and Archaeology fifth, with Anthropology, Earth Sciences, English, History and Law also in the top 50.

Today's subject-specific rankings follow on from Durham achieving its highest ever world ranking in the overall QS league table published last year, where it rose more than 30 places to 61st in the world.

The strength across Durham's academic departments was further evidenced in May 2016, when 21 of Durham's 26 departments were ranked in the top 10 in the 2017 Guardian League Tables, with 11 ranked in the top 5. 

(22 Mar 2016) » More about Durham rises in prestigious world rankings


Durham student elected Chair of Commonwealth Youth Council

Durham postgraduate student Kishva Ambigapathy has been given the responsibility of engaging 1.2 billion of the world’s young people in global issues.

MSc student Kishva has been elected as the new Chair of the Commonwealth Youth Council (CYC), the largest and most diverse youth-led organisation in the world, representing young people in 53 Commonwealth countries.

For more information, you can read the full story and watch a short video on our postgraduate web pages

(25 Feb 2016)


Helping children recover from abuse

Many children suffering from the trauma of sexual abuse can benefit from a therapy using creative methods, according to a study by Durham and Bristol universities.

The therapy offered by the NSPCC, called Letting the Future In , gives children a chance to talk about their abuse experiences and to express themselves through activities such as painting, drawing and storytelling with a therapist.

(22 Feb 2016) » More about Helping children recover from abuse


Childhood environment and fertility

The environment girls grow up in could affect their fertility as adults, according to new research by the Department of Anthropology. Lead researcher, Professor Gillian Bentley explains more. 

Childhood environment and fertility

(17 Feb 2016) » More about Childhood environment and fertility


Can a computer generate a hit musical?

Technology and art are combining to create the world’s first computer generated musical.

Dr Nick Collins, in Durham University’s Department of Music, has developed a computer composition system that produces musical scores after being fed the ingredients that make a successful show tune.

Beyond the Fence

(15 Feb 2016) » More about Can a computer generate a hit musical?


Business School appoints new Dean

Professor Susan Hart

Professor Susan Hart has been appointed as the new Dean of Durham University Business School following a competitive recruitment process. She will take up her position in summer 2016. Professor Hart, currently Associate Deputy Principal at the University of Strathclyde, will succeed Professor Rob Dixon, Dean since 2008.

(10 Feb 2016) » More about Business School appoints new Dean


Folk tales are older than you think

Beauty and The Beast

Many folktales can be traced back to prehistoric populations that existed thousands of years ago, according to research which has attracted media attention across the globe. Co-author of the study, Dr Jamie Tehrani from the Department of Anthropology explains more. 

(4 Feb 2016) » More about Folk tales are older than you think


Putting soil health on the political agenda

Soil is a vital, and often overlooked, natural resource, helping to reduce flooding and mitigate climate change. Now, thanks in part to the work of a Durham University researcher, soil health is being discussed and reviewed in Westminster. 

World Soil's Day Event - A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself

(4 Feb 2016) » More about Putting soil health on the political agenda


Monitoring methane leaks from decommissioned oil and gas wells

Decommissioned oil and gas wells can leak methane into the atmosphere but contribute less of the gas to the air than agricultural use of the same land, according to a new study.

With the possible increase in the drilling of onshore gas wells in the UK as part of any potential shale gas exploitation it has become important to understand the risk of methane leaking into the atmosphere from decommissioned gas wells.

Methane leaks from decommissioned gas wells

(26 Jan 2016) » More about Monitoring methane leaks from decommissioned oil and gas wells


Public event in Durham - Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project

In September 2015, after extensive analysis, Durham University announced that the jumbled remains of at least 17 and up to 28 individuals, found in a mass grave behind the University’s Palace Green Library, were Scottish Soldiers who fought in the 1650 Battle of Dunbar.

(22 Jan 2016) » More about Public event in Durham - Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project


World's largest canyon?

The world's largest canyon may lie under the Antarctic ice sheet, according to analysis of satellite data by a team of scientists, led by Durham University.

Antarctic Canyons: Dr Stewart Jamieson

(22 Jan 2016) » More about World's largest canyon?


How do you breathe?

How do you breathe? Simple question, simple answer, right? But maybe it is not that straightforward, or at least, not for all of us.

Breathing is, of course, central to life and also closely linked to movement and activity, yet it mostly goes unnoticed. In some situations, it is the focus of our attention such as when we exercise, sing or practise yoga. 

The Life of Breath

(4 Jan 2016) » More about How do you breathe?


The online Bible at Christmas

Churches across the world are increasingly encouraging their congregations to keep their phones on, albeit in silent mode, to access their digital Bibles. One Bible app, YouVersion, is now installed on 200 million phones or tablets in 895 languages, and one of the main Bible search websites, BibleGateway, has 1.5 million regular users in the UK alone. 

Is the Bible now an integral part of our digital culture? Should it be regarded as a sacred text to be approached in sacred ways? Is the shift towards the online Bible changing the way we understand and use its content?

The online Bible at Christmas

(21 Dec 2015) » More about The online Bible at Christmas


Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come

So many modern-day Christmas traditions were Victorian innovations – and while the story that began the 2,000-year-old tradition of Christmas is of course the story of Christ’s nativity, no other story is now more closely associated with the festive season than Charles Dickens’s 1843 novella ‘A Christmas Carol’.

Simon James, Professor of Victorian Literature and Head of the Department of English Studies at Durham University, analyses the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet To Come.

(17 Dec 2015) » More about Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come


Revealing Europe’s early “mega-sites”

Archaeologists have recreated and destroyed an experimental replica of a 6,000-year-old house to understand more about one of Europe’s earliest “mega-sites”.

The experiment is part of Durham University-led research which has been named in the World’s top 10 archaeology projects.

(16 Dec 2015) » More about Revealing Europe’s early “mega-sites”


Improving mobility in rural Africa

Research by Durham University is helping to improve mobility and access to transport for schoolchildren and the elderly in rural Africa.

The work, conducted in collaboration with local partners, has led to changes in policy to raise awareness of the difficulties children face when travelling to school and to provide better transport for the elderly.

(15 Dec 2015) » More about Improving mobility in rural Africa


Hearing Voices

Hearing voices is experienced by people with and without mental illness but is often associated with those who have schizophrenia or psychosis.

What is clear is that we still don’t fully understand what it is like to hear voices, why and how this experience arises, or what it means. 

A team of researchers at Durham University aims to better understand the experience of voice-hearing by looking at it from different academic perspectives and working with clinicians, mental health professionals and people who hear voices themselves.

Charles Fernyhough: Hearing the Voice

(9 Dec 2015) » More about Hearing Voices


Helping cities tackle climate change

Helping cities tackle climate change

United Nations (UN) guidelines to help cities meet the challenges of climate change have been drawn up with the help of Durham University expertise.

The Guiding Principles for City Climate Action Planning have been launched by UN Habitat at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP-21) in Paris.

(8 Dec 2015) » More about Helping cities tackle climate change


Fusion energy could be the future

Fusion energy offers the tantalising possibility of clean, sustainable and almost limitless energy. But can it be an economically viable option?

Professor Damian Hampshire talks about fusion energy, suggesting it could be economically viable.

(20 Sep 2015) » More about Fusion energy could be the future


Low cost ethical loans for postgraduate study

Durham University has launched an innovative postgraduate loan product to help to attract the most talented students to further study after they finish their undergraduate degree.

FundED: Future Focussed Postgraduate Loans

(20 Sep 2015) » More about Low cost ethical loans for postgraduate study


Skeletons found in mass graves are 17th Century Scottish soldiers

New analysis carried out on skeletons discovered in a centuries-old mass grave in Durham, UK, has led experts to conclude they are the remains of Scottish soldiers taken prisoner after the 1650 Battle of Dunbar.

(2 Sep 2015) » More about Skeletons found in mass graves are 17th Century Scottish soldiers


International focus on Magna Carta exhibition

Eight hundred years on from when it was first written, the enduring legacy of one of the world’s most important documents lives on.

Dr Christian Liddy and Canon Rosalind Brown talk about the significance of the Magna Carta.

(31 Aug 2015) » More about International focus on Magna Carta exhibition


Is there life out there?

Humans have long wondered: “Are we alone in the Universe?”

After all, the Earth is just one planet in one galaxy among hundreds of billions that exist across the cosmos.

 

Dr Pratika Dayal asks if there is life out there

(31 Aug 2015) » More about Is there life out there?


Understanding landslide risk in post-earthquake Nepal

In April 2015 parts of Nepal were devastated by an intense earthquake and significant aftershocks. But the danger to human life and livelihoods doesn’t end when the ground stops shaking. Earthquake-triggered landslides present an immediate and long-term threat in mountain environments, compounding the difficulties for those affected.

Developing early warning systems for vulnerable communities: Research at Durham University

(31 Aug 2015) » More about Understanding landslide risk in post-earthquake Nepal


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