Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Durham University

Research & business

Latest Research

Enabling researchers to innovate in business

We’re working to create an enabling environment where the inspiring research of our academics can become innovative solutions to economic challenges and needs, both global and local. So we’re excited to announce a new £1.7m (US $2.23m) seed investment fund to support spin-out businesses.

(6 Aug 2020) » More about Enabling researchers to innovate in business


Volunteers needed for Covid-19 detection dog trial

Our researchers who are investigating whether specially trained dogs can sniff out Covid-19 in humans are asking people in the North West region of England for help with the trial.

(6 Aug 2020) » More about Volunteers needed for Covid-19 detection dog trial


Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis

Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis

Our scientists have found a new way to kill the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB).

(29 Jul 2020) » More about Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis


University spin-out wins prestigious award

A University spin out company been recognised for its pioneering work helping Network Rail to investigate hidden shafts and voids in its tunnels.

(24 Jul 2020) » More about University spin-out wins prestigious award


Nature inspires first manufactured non-cuttable material

Nature inspires first manufactured non-cuttable material

Our engineers have been inspired by nature to create what they say is the first manufactured non-cuttable material.

(20 Jul 2020) » More about Nature inspires first manufactured non-cuttable material


English speakers some of the least likely to wear face masks

Recent research by Professor Sascha Kraus suggests Brits, Americans and other English speakers are some of the least likely to wear face masks and social distance in the world. The only native speakers, researched by the academics, less likely to following health precautions are German speakers.

(17 Jul 2020) » More about English speakers some of the least likely to wear face masks


Why better guidance on school PE is needed

Since lockdown began in England, children have become increasing sedentary with one in fourteen children reported to be doing no daily exercise. 

(17 Jul 2020) » More about why better guidance on school PE is needed


Galaxy evolution research among most cited of past decade

The EAGLE Project. Simulating the universe

A supercomputer simulation carried out in Durham that realistically calculates the formation of galaxies from the Big Bang to the present day is one of cosmology’s most popular research papers of the past decade.

(16 Jul 2020) » More about Galaxy evolution research among most cited of past decade


Study reveals long-term impact of rugby injuries

Rugby players continue to suffer from their high ‘injury load’ after retirement from the sport.

(16 Jul 2020) » More about Study reveals long-term impact of rugby injuries


Revealing the atmospheric impact of planetary collisions

The atmospheric impact of gigantic planetary collisions

Giant impacts have a wide range of consequences for young planets and their atmospheres, according to research led by our scientists.

(15 Jul 2020) » More about Revealing the atmospheric impact of planetary collisions


Report calls for higher education to empower Muslim voices

A fresh debate on future models of university citizenship is called for by a new report, based on a survey of students nationally conducted by Durham and three other universities.

(14 Jul 2020) » More about Report calls for higher education to empower Muslim voices


How partnerships help us make a difference

At Durham, we know the value of partnerships. Why? Because they help us make a difference. And because they help to make sure our research makes changes to the way we live, solve complex industry challenges, and even help our graduates find jobs.

(10 Jul 2020) » More about How partnerships help us make a difference


Positive culture change in family firms

The impact of Covid-19 has forced a drastic positive culture change in family firms, creating stronger solidarity and cohesion within companies, plus increased digitalisation, according to new research at the School.

(10 Jul 2020) » More about Positive culture change in family firms


Baboons do not view researchers as neutral

Baboons who are used to researcher presence are less tolerant than we thought, according to a new study by our anthropologists.

(9 Jul 2020) » More about Baboons do not view researchers as neutral


Reducing racial bias in facial recognition

Our computer scientists are helping to reduce racial bias in facial recognition algorithms.

(9 Jul 2020) » More about Reducing racial bias in facial recognition


Why the term “Super-spreader” can be stigmatising and unhelpful

Emma Cave from Durham Law School considers the impact of the label ‘super-spreader’.

(7 Jul 2020) » More about why the term “Super-spreader” can be stigmatising and unhelpful


Culture dictates how we cope with Covid-19 career impact

Whether we’re more concerned with our own career development or the success of the company is often determined by our culture, research at the School has revealed.

(3 Jul 2020) » More about Culture dictates how we cope with Covid-19 career impact


How we started a #womenintech revolution

Tech Up Women - How far we've come!

In 2019, we launched TechUPWomen, a programme that took 100 women from the north and midlands (UK) and retrained them for a career in technology.

(29 Jun 2020) » More about How we started a #womenintech revolution


Transforming vacuums into ventilators

Dr Joanna Berry talks us through how, when the world was going into lockdown, vacuums were turned into ventilators through an innovative collaboration between people and organisations.

(29 Jun 2020) » More about Transforming vacuums into ventilators


Decarbonising heat research receives over £4 million in funding

We’ve won major funding for three new research projects to decarbonise heat which will significantly reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions.

(26 Jun 2020) » More about Decarbonising heat research receives over £4 million in funding


The Culture of Women in Tech

Dr Mariann Hardey has a new podcast episode out this week with New Books Network. The episode focuses around the culture of women in tech and Dr Hardey’s own experiences in this area.

(26 Jun 2020) » More about The Culture of Women in Tech


How water could trigger earthquakes and volcanoes

We’re investigating if water cycles deep in the Earth play a role in the triggering and strength of earthquakes and volcanoes.

(24 Jun 2020) » More about How water could trigger earthquakes and volcanoes


Testing cheaper than lockdown

Mass testing is the safest way to reopen the economy and society and will cost much less than a hard lockdown, research reveals.

 By Abderrahim Taamouti - June 2020

(22 Jun 2020) » More about Testing cheaper than lockdown


Why do we stare at ourselves on video calls?

Aarron Toal, PhD Candidate, explores why we stare at ourselves on video calls.

(22 Jun 2020) » More about Why do we stare at ourselves on video calls?


How earthquakes shape the landscape

Our geographers have revealed just how large earthquakes can change the physical features of the landscape surrounding them.

(17 Jun 2020) » More about How earthquakes shape the landscape


Teachers worried about safety in schools

The majority of teachers do not think that schools can effectively put in place social distancing measures, according to a survey.

(17 Jun 2020) » More about Teachers worried about safety in schools


What archaeological records can tell us about historic epidemics

Infectious diseases have been with us since our beginnings as a species. Professor Charlotte Roberts explains what the archaeological record reveals about epidemics throughout history – and the human response to them.

(17 Jun 2020) » More about what archaeological records can tell us about historic epidemics


The future of women’s football is under threat

two women footballers chasing a football

New research by Dr Stacey Pope has found that Covid-19 is impacting men’s and women’s football differently. She and her fellow researchers believe urgent action is required to stop the coronavirus epidemic from destroying the women’s game, as they explain here.

(16 Jun 2020) » More about the future of women’s football is under threat


First space-based measurement of neutron lifetime

Our researchers have helped to find a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time.

(11 Jun 2020) » More about First space-based measurement of neutron lifetime


Black hole’s heart still beating

Black hole heartbeat graphic

The first confirmed heartbeat of a supermassive black hole is still going strong more than ten years after first being observed.

(10 Jun 2020) » More about Black hole’s heart still beating


Durham in world’s top 100 universities

Durham University has again been ranked as a World Top 100 university.

(10 Jun 2020) » More about Durham in world’s top 100 universities


Durham ranked in the UK top ten

Owengate leading to Durham Cathedral

We’ve once again been ranked as one of the UK’s leading universities alongside our standing as a world top 100 university.

(9 Jun 2020) » More about Durham ranked in the UK top ten


New floating energy platforms provide an alternative to fossil fuels

Durham Energy Institute (DEI) researchers are helping to revolutionise renewable energy generation and storage in a project that aims to offer environmentally friendly power generation to coastal communities that don’t have access to reliable grid electricity.

(5 Jun 2020) » More about New floating energy platforms provide an alternative to fossil fuels


Dunkirk: how British newspapers helped to turn defeat into a miracle

As the UK gets ready to mark the 80th Anniversary of the rescue of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) from Dunkirk, Professor Tim Luckhurst, founding Principal of our new South College, looks at how British newspaper journalists were forced to report it from afar.

(29 May 2020) » More about Dunkirk: how British newspapers helped to turn defeat into a miracle


Tune into our arts and humanities podcasts

We’ve launched a new five-part podcast series that shines a light on our world-class arts and humanities research.

(26 May 2020) » More about Tune into our arts and humanities podcasts


Consumers post-Covid-19

Aarron Toal, from our Business School, explores what the future may hold for consumers after Covid-19.

(22 May 2020) » More about consumers post-Covid-19


Durham world top 50 for number of UN Sustainable Development Goals

Durham Infancy and Sleep Centre. Helping parents and babies sleep better

We’ve been named as one of the world’s top universities for our contribution to a number of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

(21 May 2020) » More about Durham world top 50 for number of UN Sustainable Development Goals


Secrets of famous French painter revealed

The mystery behind a painting by a renowned French post-impressionist may have been revealed by new research that has unearthed secrets from his past.

(18 May 2020) » More about Secrets of famous French painter revealed


UK Government supports Covid-19 detection dogs trial

The UK Government has awarded a specialist team of researchers more than £500,000 to find out if specially-trained bio-detection dogs could be used as a new rapid testing measure for Covid-19.

(16 May 2020) » More about UK Government supports Covid-19 detection dogs trial


Durham academic selected as New Generation Thinker

Dr Noreen Masud has taken up the prestigious role as one of this year’s New Generation Thinkers (NGT) which will see her working with the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and BBC Radio 3. 

(15 May 2020) » More about Durham academic selected as New Generation Thinker


Grief in the time of Covid-19

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought massive changes to our lives including how we say goodbye to our loved ones.

(14 May 2020) » More about grief in the time of Covid-19


How will Covid-19 affect productivity in the UK?

Professor Richard Harris from our Business School uses the 2008-09 recession as a benchmark for assessing the possible impact of Covid-19 on productivity in the UK.

(12 May 2020) » More about how will Covid-19 affect productivity in the UK?


VE day and national thanksgiving in 1945

After Victory in Europe Day (VE Day) on 8 May 1945, thanksgiving services were held in churches throughout Britain and overseas. Philip Williamson, Professor of Modern History, reveals the meticulous planning that went on behind the scenes.

(11 May 2020) » More about VE day and national thanksgiving in 1945


Should we wear face masks?

Claire Horwell in our Department of Earth Sciences and Fiona McDonald in the Faculty of Law at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia, consider the mixed messages behind face mask use during the Covid-19 pandemic.

(5 May 2020) » More about should we wear face masks?


Early career Psychology research wins prestigious award

One of our early career Psychology researchers has been recognised with a prestigious award for her outstanding PhD research.

(1 May 2020) » More about Early career Psychology research wins prestigious award


How emotional memories of Coronavirus will affect our future

Graffiti image of mask with the words covid 19

 Elena Miltiadis from Anthropology considers the way our emotional memory of this pandemic will affect our future behaviour

(1 May 2020) » More about how emotional memories of Coronavirus wiill affect our future


Largest amount of microplastics found on ocean floor

Our researchers have helped record the highest level of microplastics ever found on the ocean floor – with up to 1.9 million pieces in an area of just one square metre.

(30 Apr 2020) » More about Largest amount of microplastics found on ocean floor


Young people’s experiences of life under lockdown

What is life like for young people during the current crisis? How do they feel and what impact is the Coronavirus pandemic having on their education, job, housing, finance and relationships?

(29 Apr 2020) » More about young people’s experiences of life under lockdown


Helium supplies at risk from plunging oil prices

Professor Jon Gluyas from our Durham Energy Institute explains why this is bad news for the coronavirus effort.

(28 Apr 2020) » More about helium supplies at risk from plunging oil prices


Research helps transform coal mine into geothermal heat source

Our research is being used to transform coal mines into multi-million pound renewable energy systems.

(24 Apr 2020) » More about research helps transform coal mine into geothermal heat source


Literary expert honoured

One of our leading academics has been honoured for his contribution to the promotion of English literature.

(21 Apr 2020) » More about Literary expert honoured


Valuing ‘unskilled’ work

Dr Jo McBride from our Business School and Professor Miguel Martínez Lucio from the University of Manchester explain how Covid-19 is changing the way we value “unskilled” work in our society.

(8 Apr 2020) » More about valuing ‘unskilled’ work


The UK Government, businesses and unions are cooperating during Covid-19

Professor Bernd Brandl explains why it is vital that the UK Government, business groups and trade unions continue to cooperate as they tackle the impact of Covid-19.

(6 Apr 2020) » More about the UK Government, businesses and unions are cooperating during Covid-19


Airlines, Covid-19, climate change and risk reporting

Professor Carol Adams examines how airlines have been reporting risk, how global pandemics like Covid-19 fit into this and how this may affect their futures.

(3 Apr 2020) » More about airlines, Covid-19, climate change and risk reporting


How to avoid pension scams and fraud during Covid-19

Dr Anna Tilba suggests how we can protect ourselves against the scams and frauds, which are increasing during Covid-19. 

(3 Apr 2020) » More about how to avoid pension scams and fraud during Covid-19


Geography and Physics research wins over £7million funding

Our Geography and Physics research is among the best in the world and we’ve just received three prestigious awards.

(31 Mar 2020) » More about Geography and Physics research wins over £7million funding


CO₂ emissions are plummeting – here’s how to keep them down

A positive result of the world’s response to Coronavirus, means that CO₂ emissions have been slashed. Professor Simone Abram looks at how we can maintain this environmental benefit.

(27 Mar 2020) » More about CO₂ emissions are plummeting – here’s how to keep them down


Dogs could join fight against Covid-19

New research will look into whether man’s best friend could play a role in preventing the spread of Coronavirus.

(27 Mar 2020) » More about dogs could join fight against Covid-19


The lockdown is a dangerous time for victims of domestic abuse

As the coronavirus lockdown continues in the UK and many other countries Professor Nicole Westmarland and Rosanna Bellini provide a guide on what we need to consider in relation to domestic abuse. 

(26 Mar 2020) » More about the lockdown is a dangerous time for victims of domestic abuse


How to build a universe

How to build a universe

How do you build a universe?

(19 Mar 2020) » More about How to build a universe


Five things to ‘dig’ about heritage at Durham

Our researchers are the history detectives, unearthing exciting things from our past and helping us learn from our ancestors.

(16 Mar 2020) » More about Five things to ‘dig’ about heritage at Durham


The origins of life on Earth challenged in new research

How did life on earth begin? There’s hardly a bigger question, but one of the most commonly held theories has been challenged by new research.

(11 Mar 2020) » More about The origins of life on Earth challenged in new research


Commemorating Basil Bunting and Briggflatts

Did you know that we’re home to the archives of one of Britain’s most distinguished modern poets?

Basil Bunting reading from 'Briggflatts'

(6 Mar 2020) » More about Commemorating Basil Bunting and Briggflatts


Record 19 Durham subjects in world top 100

A record 19 Durham subjects have been named in the top 100 of a major international league table.

(4 Mar 2020) » More about Record 19 Durham subjects in world top 100


Durham welcomes Spanish Consul General

Our work to help bring the vast wealth of Spanish art and culture to the world has been marked by a visit from Spain’s Consul General.

(3 Mar 2020) » More about Durham welcomes Spanish Consul General


Durham Inspired – North East Scholarships programme launched as part of record donation

We want to welcome the best and brightest students with the merit and potential to succeed, regardless of their economic circumstances. 

That’s one of the reasons we are delighted to announce the establishment of a major scholarships programme to enable students from low-income backgrounds in North East England to study here at Durham.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about New scholarships programme part of record donation


Education experts to advise Government

Three of our education experts have been appointed to a Cabinet Panel to help Government decide which policies work and which don’t.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about Education experts to advise Government


Global conservation priorities identified in new research

Environmental conditions, more than human activity, explain why some parts of the globe have more endangered species than others, according to new research.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about Global conservation priorities identified in new research


Durham to host new national supercomputer

We’re hosting a new £3.1m supercomputer facility to address challenges in subjects ranging from Artificial Intelligence to advanced X-ray imaging.

(17 Feb 2020) » More about Durham to host new national supercomputer


Monumental medieval chapel finally uncovered

Our archaeologists have helped uncover the remains of a long lost chapel from Britain’s medieval past.

(17 Feb 2020) » More about Monumental medieval chapel finally uncovered


Meet our Bone Detectives

Person wearing forensic gloves examining a skull

Did you know that our teeth and bones hold many secrets?

(14 Feb 2020) » More about meet our Bone Detectives


Vital rainfall belt at risk from climate change

Our researchers have found that future climate warming could put a tropical rainfall belt relied upon by billions of people at risk

(14 Feb 2020) » More about Vital rainfall belt at risk from climate change


Learning from nature to tackle global challenges

The solutions to some of the most pressing global challenges could be right under our noses, in the trees, plants and insects around us.

(12 Feb 2020) » More about Learning from nature to tackle global challenges


Archaeologists unearth Durham’s earliest known resident

Durham is well known for its inspiring World Heritage Site, home to the 900-year-old Durham Castle and Cathedral. But our archaeologists have now found proof that people have been living in the area for at least 2,000 years.

(11 Feb 2020) » More about Archaeologists unearth Durham’s earliest known resident


Rare Viking-age board game piece found

Our archaeologists have helped unearth a 1,200 year old board game piece on a small island off the coast of north east England.

(11 Feb 2020) » More about Rare Viking-age board game piece found


Animal spotting project helps double children’s mammal knowledge

A roe deer captured on camera by a MammalWeb motion-sensing camera

A citizen science project we ran in schools has dramatically increased children’s knowledge of UK wild mammals.

(4 Feb 2020) » More about Animal spotting project helps double children’s mammal knowledge


UK Government minister praises inspiring research and innovation at Durham

Universities Minister Chris Skidmore Visits Durham University

Our researchers are tackling some of the biggest challenges facing the world today, from improving soil health in Africa to working to prevent natural disasters in Southern Asia. So it was great to be able to show Chris Skidmore, the UK Government’s Universities Minister, some examples of our research and innovation in action.

(24 Jan 2020) » More about UK Government minister praises inspiring research and innovation at Durham


Unearthing Britain’s medieval past

Our archaeologists have unearthed the secrets of Britain’s most powerful bishops to teach us more about the country’s medieval past.

(21 Jan 2020) » More about Unearthing Britain’s medieval past


Influential Durham law expert made honorary QC

Influential Durham law expert made honorary QC

A Durham law expert who has championed women in the legal profession and shaped new laws on extreme pornography and upskirting has been appointed an honorary Queen’s Counsel (QC).

(16 Jan 2020) » More about Influential Durham law expert made honorary QC


Professor recognised for contribution to dyslexia understanding

One of our leading education experts has been recognised for his work to improve our understanding of reading disability.

(10 Jan 2020) » More about Professor recognised for contribution to dyslexia understanding


Baby sleep expertise leads to new bedsharing advice

Research by our baby sleep experts has led to new international guidance on bedsharing.

(7 Jan 2020) » More about Baby sleep expertise leads to new bedsharing advice


That’s a wrap 2019

As 2019 has now drawn to a close, we are taking the opportunity to look back and celebrate some of our highlights of the past year here at Durham, and here’s just a handful! We can’t wait to see what 2020 will bring.

(2 Jan 2020) » More about That’s a wrap 2019


Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women

Films, adverts and reality TV shows don’t always paint a realistic picture of women’s body shapes but how much influence does TV have on our preferences?

Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women

(19 Dec 2019) » More about Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women


Five cool things about our Cosmology & Astronomy research

Revealing the true colours of quasars

Research at Durham isn’t just confined to life here on Earth.

(17 Dec 2019) » More about Five cool things about our Cosmology & Astronomy research


Sharing our 350-year-old library with the world

We’re proud to be home to the earliest public library in the North East of England, Cosin’s Library, established in 1669 by John Cosin, Bishop of Durham for the benefit of the local community.

(17 Dec 2019) » More about Sharing our 350-year-old library with the world


Enduring interest in the fate of the Scottish Soldiers

In the six years since we found a mass grave of 17th century prisoners on Durham University land, our Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project has captivated thousands of people across the world.

(16 Dec 2019) » More about Enduring interest in the fate of the Scottish Soldiers


Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected

Animation - Greenland ice losses

Greenland is losing ice seven times faster than in the 1990s, shows a new study by an international research team including Durham University.

(10 Dec 2019) » More about Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected


Durham researchers named among world’s best

At Durham we’ve long had a global reputation for the high standard and impact of our research.

(6 Dec 2019) » More about Durham researchers named among world’s best


Universities ‘should have legal duty’ to fight sexual violence

Anonymous group of male and female students walking

Universities in the UK should have new legal duties to prevent and respond effectively to sexual violence and harassment on campus, according to a survey of selected higher education staff whose views were analysed in a new study.

(5 Dec 2019) » More about universities ‘should have legal duty’ to fight sexual violence


Air pollution and the ethics of recommending facemasks

Record levels of air pollution have been measured in some parts of the world posing a danger to human health.

(27 Nov 2019) » More about Air pollution and the ethics of recommending facemasks


Supporting our technicians

Our technical staff play an important part in our ongoing success, so we’re proud to be supporting our technical community through the Technician Commitment.

(22 Nov 2019) » More about Supporting our technicians


Durham ranked in world top 100 for Physical Sciences

How a simple mesh could clean up oil spills

We’ve once again been ranked in the world top 100 for our strengths in Physical Sciences in an international league table.

(19 Nov 2019) » More about Durham ranked in world top 100 for Physical Sciences


Five thousand eyes on the sky

A cutting-edge new telescope instrument designed and built by an international team including Durham University has taken its first observations of the night sky.

(18 Nov 2019) » More about Five thousand eyes on the sky


India’s National Academy of Sciences honours Durham researcher

One of our leading researchers is to be honoured by India’s oldest science academy.

(18 Nov 2019) » More about India’s National Academy of Sciences honours Durham researcher


National Energy Champion award for geothermal researcher

Research into the potential of using geothermal energy as a low-carbon heat source has won a national award for one of our leading researchers.

(13 Nov 2019) » More about National Energy Champion award for geothermal researcher


Is social media a plague we can’t escape?

Dr Mariann Hardey, Associate Professor at Durham University Business School, is a social scientist and digital humanities scholar.
Her research interests have long been concerned with mediated relationships and digital communications while bringing a richer comprehension of opportunities around working in technology into the process of leadership with a focus on supporting gender equality in tech in particular.

(14 Oct 2019) » More about Is social media a plague we can’t escape?


Stemettes inspire the next generation of women in tech

Anne-Marie Imafidon is Head Stemette and cofounder of Stemettes – an award-winning social enterprise inspiring the next generation of females into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

(14 Oct 2019) » More about Stemettes inspire the next generation of women in tech


Is Planet 9 really a black hole?

Is there a black hole in our solar system?

(10 Oct 2019) » More about Is Planet 9 really a black hole?


Leading social scientists awarded Fellowships of the Academy of Social Sciences

Following an extensive peer review process, five of our academic colleagues have been awarded Fellowships by the Academy of Social Sciences, the UK’s national academy of academics, learned societies and practitioners in the social sciences. They are recognised for the excellence and impact of their work through the use of social science for public benefit. 

(9 Oct 2019) » More about Leading social scientists awarded Fellowships of the Academy of Social Sciences


Observing the Cosmic Web

Astronomers get detailed view of Cosmic Web

The Cosmic Web is believed to contain huge threads of gas that connect multiple galaxies across the universe.

(4 Oct 2019) » More about Observing the Cosmic Web


Should summer-born pupils be treated differently?

Evidence shows that children who are among the youngest in their year at school do less well on average than their autumn-born classmates.

(3 Oct 2019) » More about should summer-born pupils be treated differently?


Durham geothermal energy expertise at UK Conservative Party conference

Delegates at the UK Conservative Party annual conference have heard how Durham’s research could provide a long-term, sustainable source of low-carbon energy.

Shaping the Future of Energy - Interview with Prof. Jon Gluyas, Director Durham Energy Institute

(2 Oct 2019) » More about Durham geothermal energy expertise at UK Conservative Party conference


Why our extreme porn laws need to change

A law against possession of rape pornography, introduced in 2015, is very rarely used with few charges and prosecutions.

(1 Oct 2019) » More about Why our extreme porn laws need to change


Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research

We’re leading a national research project to decarbonise transport through hydrogen-fuelled vehicles and technology.

(30 Sep 2019) » More about Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research


Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on East Antarctic Ice Sheet

More than 65,000 meltwater lakes have been discovered on the edge of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet by our researchers.

(25 Sep 2019) » More about Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on East Antarctic Ice Sheet


New enterprise zone to work with industry

How a simple mesh could clean up oil spills

From developing a mesh coating that could help clean up oil spills to finding greener energy alternatives, our research is really making a difference.


Now, we’ve been awarded over £1.4m to develop premises in the North East of England for businesses where they can collaborate with our world-leading research experts.

(20 Sep 2019) » More about New enterprise zone to work with industry


Recognition for rising stars of research

Two pioneering researchers - one who is improving telescope images of space and the other studying the environmentally damaging practice of sand mining - have received national recognition for their work.

(20 Sep 2019) » More about recognition for rising stars of research


Greenland is melting but it’s the tip of the iceberg

Rapid melting of glaciers in Greenland is causing major concern but we know from many years of research that the problem is much more widespread.

(19 Sep 2019) » More about Greenland is melting but it’s the tip of the iceberg


Why humans take so long to grow up

Why do our children take so long to grow up, compared to other animals?

(18 Sep 2019) » More about why humans take so long to grow up


The heat beneath our feet

Old coal mines could provide us with a source of low-carbon heat for many years to come, according to geothermal energy expert Dr Charlotte Adams, who is the new President of the Geology section at the British Science Association.

Here, Charlotte, who is a member of our Durham Energy Institute, explains more about her research into how water stored in flooded abandoned mines could provide cleaner energy for homes and businesses.

(17 Sep 2019) » More about The heat beneath our feet


Developing cheaper and more efficient solar power

Our scientists have helped to solve a puzzle that could lead to cheaper and more efficient solar power.

(16 Sep 2019) » More about Developing cheaper and more efficient solar power


Support for voice-hearers goes online

People who hear voices, their families and mental health professionals will benefit from a new information and support website based on research by Durham University.

(11 Sep 2019) » More about Support for voice-hearers goes online


Five cool things about our environmental research

How three students are trying to reduce the plastic mountain

From decarbonising heat to food security and water sustainability, we’re working to bring about improvements that will benefit nature and the well-being of the planet.

(5 Sep 2019) » More about Five cool things about our environmental research


Improving working conditions in Africa

Rethabile's Story - Short Version

Millions of people worldwide work in low-waged, insecure jobs that don’t provide a decent living with many also working in unsafe conditions that deny fundamental rights.

(5 Sep 2019) » More about Improving working conditions in Africa


A new home for the archive of ‘Radical Jack’

Opening up the archives of Radical Jack

A political firebrand, a radical reformist and a leading society figure – the life and times of John George Lambton, first Earl of Durham, were truly captivating.

Durham University is now the new home to the archives of Lord Durham, as he was also known, whose energetic support for political reform earned him the nickname ‘Radical Jack’.

(30 Aug 2019) » More about A new home for the archive of ‘Radical Jack’


Smart surfaces as a solution to global challenges

Professor Jas Pal Badyal, a Fellow of the Royal Society, is widely considered a leader in the field of surface science. Here he talks about the students in his team, their inventions and tackling global challenges.

(22 Aug 2019) » More about smart surfaces as a solution to global challenges


Keeping Africa moving in a changing climate

Durham’s engineers are working with partners in Africa to find ways to use cheaper and more sustainable local materials to build all-weather, low-traffic roads and railway lines.

(21 Aug 2019) » More about Keeping Africa moving in a changing climate


Revealing quasars’ true colours

Revealing the true colours of quasars

Our astronomers have identified a rare moment in the life of some of the universe’s most energetic objects.

(7 Aug 2019) » More about Revealing quasars’ true colours


Malaysian Minister of Education visits Durham

The University has hosted a visit by the Malaysian Minister of Education to celebrate a new partnership that will see an important collection of diplomatic papers digitised for study in South East Asia.

(26 Jul 2019) » More about Malaysian Minister of Education visits Durham


Prestigious fellowships awarded to two academics

We’re celebrating after two of our academics were awarded Fellowships by the British Academy, the UK’s national academy for the humanities and social sciences.

(23 Jul 2019) » More about Prestigious fellowships awarded to two academics


Measuring the expanding universe

Our physicists will help create a 3D map of galaxies to learn more about the universe’s accelerating expansion.

(17 Jul 2019) » More about Measuring the expanding universe


Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity

Einstein’s theory of General Relativity is world famous – but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form.

(8 Jul 2019) » More about Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity


How a tiny bug inspires surfaces that don’t get wet

A tiny bug is the inspiration for research that could one day provide clean water or help ships sail more efficiently.

(5 Jul 2019) » More about How a tiny bug inspires surfaces that don’t get wet


Celebrating women who make a difference

At Durham we’re proud to be home to incredible women who are making a difference in the world.

(3 Jul 2019) » More about Celebrating women who make a difference


Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction

Women in Nepal are having a say in how to reduce the risk of disasters like fires and landslides.

Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction

(3 Jul 2019) » More about Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction


Celebrating world class arts and humanities

Performances from a poet, a playwright and a musician were part of our annual research showcase for arts and humanities at Durham, a subject area ranked in the world top 30.

(2 Jul 2019) » More about celebrating world class arts and humanities


How unwanted sexual images are shattering lives

Imagine if you had a sexual image of yourself shared online without your consent. Sadly, this happens all too often and can be absolutely devastating for the victim.

(1 Jul 2019) » More about How unwanted sexual images are shattering lives


Permanent headstone marks Scottish soldiers resting place

The headstone has been installed at the grave of the 17th Century Scottish soldiers buried in Durham City, providing a permanent marker of their resting place. 

(28 Jun 2019) » More about Permanent headstone marks Scottish soldiers resting place


Reducing the plastic mountain

Every single minute, a truck load of plastic ends up in our oceans, killing millions of animals every year. This is only going to get worse unless we do something about it.

How three students are trying to reduce the plastic mountain

(26 Jun 2019) » More about Reducing the plastic mountain


Reviving the music of great composers

We’re helping to bring the forgotten music of two great classical composers back to life.

Bringing the works of great composers back to life

(26 Jun 2019) » More about Reviving the music of great composers


Celebrating four great female philosophers

Is time real? Do we have free will? Philosophical questions such as these seem to have little connection with current issues like the climate crisis or Brexit.

(20 Jun 2019) » More about celebrating four great female philosophers


US military bigger polluter than most countries

Surprised by the headline? No wonder when discussions about greenhouse gas emissions tend to focus on statistics for countries, not institutions. But research from our Department of Geography, in partnership with Lancaster University, found that the US military’s carbon footprint is so big it out ranks that of most countries in the world.

(19 Jun 2019) » More about US military bigger polluter than most countries


We’re a World Top 100 university

Durham University has again been ranked as a World Top 100 university – putting us in the top eight per cent of universities worldwide in a new league table.

(19 Jun 2019) » More about We’re a World Top 100 university


Bringing no man’s land to life online

Virtual Reality and 3D modelling have been used to bring some of the world’s hidden areas to life online.

(18 Jun 2019) » More about Bringing no man’s land to life online


A city that's more afraid of tigers than earthquakes

People living in one of Nepal’s biggest cities are more worried about attacks by tigers and rhinos than a repeat of the earthquake that caused devastation a little over four years ago.

(4 Jun 2019) » More about A city that's more afraid of tigers than earthquakes


From food flavourings to biofuels, metals are key

We all know that metals like iron and calcium are essential for a healthy body - but our pioneering scientists estimate that almost half of life’s processes depend upon various metals interacting with living cells.

(17 May 2019) » More about from food flavourings to biofuels, metals are key


Universities would be £4.5m poorer without chaplains

University chaplains play an important role in the lives of students of many different faiths and are believed to contribute around £4.5 million per year of volunteer labour to the UK Higher Education sector.

(9 May 2019) » More about universities would be £4.5m poorer without chaplains


Star award for dark matter research

A Durham astrophysicist has been named as a rising star of research and innovation for her work on the mysterious substance that makes up a large part of the universe.

(7 May 2019) » More about Star award for dark matter research


Students showcase research at Westminster

Our students have visited Parliament to show how technology normally used to explain the mysteries of the universe can create clearer X-ray images of humans.

(7 May 2019) » More about Students showcase research at Westminster


How to keep your bones strong

Think you should slow down as you get older? Think again!

(25 Apr 2019) » More about how to keep your bones strong


Online course brings Scottish soldiers project to the world

Durham University has launched an online archaeology course to give people around the world the chance to study one of its most captivating research projects, relating to the fate of the prisoners from the Battle of Dunbar in 1650.

(23 Apr 2019) » More about Online course brings Scottish soldiers project to the world


Top jobs still lack diversity and equality

Privately educated, white, male graduates are more likely to be recruited to senior roles and be paid higher wages by elite multinational firms, new research shows.

(18 Apr 2019) » More about top jobs still lack diversity and equality


Saving coffee using space technology

We drink two billion cups of coffee every day – 95 million cups in the UK alone.

(29 Mar 2019) » More about Saving coffee using space technology


Improved housing in Africa could prevent disease

Housing in sub-Saharan Africa has dramatically improved and could help in the fight against diseases such as malaria.

(28 Mar 2019) » More about Improved housing in Africa could prevent disease


Ancient royal charter discovered in Durham

An ancient royal charter might not be what everyone expects to find when they come to work, but for one of our visiting fellows that’s exactly what happened.

(26 Mar 2019) » More about Ancient royal charter discovered in Durham


Making water more sustainable

Water is a precious and vital resource that is under threat from climate change and growing demands.

(21 Mar 2019) » More about Making water more sustainable


Tackling risks from outer space

Space is a risky place. Our planet faces a number of potential threats from asteroids and comets to the impact of space weather on vital technologies.

(19 Mar 2019) » More about Tackling risks from outer space


Plan to grow North’s chemicals sector

Did you know that the North of England’s research strengths in chemical and process industries could help to contribute more than £20billion to the UK economy over the next 20 years?

(18 Mar 2019) » More about Plan to grow North’s chemicals sector


Training the next generation of global problem solvers

Tropical diseases, water and food security, and flooding are some of the issues being tackled by our new training centre dedicated to global challenges.

(13 Mar 2019) » More about Training the next generation of global problem solvers


How to keep sleeping babies safe

How best to keep babies safe when they’re asleep has been a focus of research by our specialists for more than 20 years.

(11 Mar 2019) » More about How to keep sleeping babies safe


#BalanceforBetter: A royal celebration of Women, Peace and Security

Two of our leading researchers celebrated International Women’s Day at an event in Buckingham Palace to mark 20 years of Women, Peace and Security.

(8 Mar 2019) » More about #BalanceforBetter: A royal celebration of Women, Peace and Security


Durham professor appointed to UK’s Infected Blood Inquiry

A Durham University professor is giving her expertise to an Inquiry looking at how men, women and children in the UK received infected blood products.

(1 Mar 2019) » More about Durham professor appointed to UK’s Infected Blood Inquiry


Gambling apps encourage futile betting

Person using mobile phone

Low-value bets and video game-style play may make smartphone gambling apps seem like harmless fun. But could they be encouraging people to play even when it is no longer possible to win? 

(22 Feb 2019) » More about Gambling apps encourage futile betting


World top six ranking for space science

Durham University’s astrophysicists have been ranked joint sixth in the world for the quality and influence of their research in space science.

(19 Feb 2019) » More about World top six ranking for space science


Medieval thinking meets modern research

Image showing digital artwork of medieval understanding of the universe

Imagine being able to step back in time and see how a great mind of the past understood our world, or experience how food and drink tasted hundreds of years ago.

Well, research led by Durham University is allowing people to do just that. 

(15 Feb 2019) » More about Medieval thinking meets modern research


New Vice-Provost (Research) appointed

We are pleased to announce that Professor Colin Bain has been appointed as Vice-Provost (Research).

(14 Feb 2019) » More about the appointment of our new Vice-Provost (Research)


Should fish and chips portions be smaller?

Fish and chips in take-away box

Next time you go for your fish and chips, you might be able to choose your portion size.

(7 Feb 2019) » More about should fish and chips portions be smaller?


Does Santa need a passport?

We all know that Santa Claus lives at the North Pole. But what is his citizenship? Who collects taxes from the elves’ workshop? And how is this all being affected by climate change?

(19 Dec 2018) » More about does Santa need a passport?


Festival drug checking can reduce drug-related harm

One of the biggest dangers for people who take illegal drugs at festivals is knowing what has been supplied to them – in terms of contents, strength and contaminants.

(9 Dec 2018) » More about Festival drug checking can reduce drug-related harm


Play with time at Oriental Museum exhibition

Yasmin and Florence Bird experiment with the When the Dust Settles artwork

Visitors to the Oriental Museum can explore the physics and philosophy of time at a new interactive exhibition.

(19 Oct 2018) » More about Play with time at Oriental Museum exhibition


Avalanche – making a deadly snowstorm

Explosives, snow and a car were used to trigger an avalanche in an episode of BBC2’s Horizon Programme to reveal more about the mystery behind this natural rollercoaster. The experiment was led by avalanche expert, Professor Jim McElwaine, from Durham University’s Earth Sciences department.

(18 Oct 2018) » More about Avalanche – making a deadly snowstorm


Astronomers identify far flung galaxies

Astronomers have captured a spectacular image of a massive galaxy cluster embedded among nearly thousands of previously unseen galaxies scattered across space and time.

Zooming onto the galaxy cluster Abell 370

(13 Sep 2018) » More about Astronomers identify far flung galaxies


North-South divide in chronic pain

England has a North-South ‘pain divide’, with a clear geographical split in the prevalence and intensity of chronic pain and the use of potentially addictive opioid pain killers, shows new research.

(12 Sep 2018) » More about North-South divide in chronic pain


Protecting against volcanic ash

A first of its kind study, led by Dr Claire Horwell of the Department of Earth Sciences and Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience, has found that industry-certified particle masks are most effective at protecting people from volcanic ash, whilst commonly used surgical masks offer less protection.

(11 Sep 2018) » More about Protecting against volcanic ash


Funding boost for Strategy delivery

Durham University has successfully secured £225 million of borrowing through a private placement.

(30 Aug 2018) » More about Funding boost for Strategy delivery


Earthquake research could improve seismic forecasts

The timing and size of three deadly earthquakes that struck Italy in 2016 may have been pre-determined, according to new research that could improve future earthquake forecasts.

(23 Aug 2018) » More about Earthquake research could improve seismic forecasts


Physicists reveal oldest galaxies

Some of the faintest satellite galaxies orbiting our own Milky Way galaxy are amongst the very first that formed in our Universe, physicists have found.

(17 Aug 2018) » More about Physicists reveal oldest galaxies