Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Research

Latest Research

Upskirting law welcome, but could go further, expert says

Planned new laws to criminalise upskirting are welcome but could go further, a leading academic expert has argued.

(21 Jun 2018) » More about Upskirting law welcome, but could go further, expert says


Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting

Professor Clare McGlynn of Durham Law School tells how her research has helped to shape a law on upskirting and why more comprehensive legislation is needed to protect victims from all image-based sexual abuse.

(19 Jun 2018) » More about Changing the law to protect victims of upskirting


Grammar schools could be damaging to social mobility

Grammar schools are no better or worse than non-selective state schools in terms of attainment, but can be damaging to social mobility, according to new research by Durham University.

(27 Mar 2018) » More about grammar schools could be damaging to social mobility


Understanding Antarctic ice sheet changes

The West Antarctic Ice Sheet was able to re-grow after shrinking but the process is not fast enough to combat the impact of today’s climate change, according to research involving Durham University.

(18 Jun 2018) » More about Understanding Antarctic ice sheet changes


Exhibition tells the story of 17th Century Scottish soldiers

The story of the Seventeenth Century Scottish soldiers, whose remains were discovered in two mass burial sites in Durham City in 2013, is the subject of a major new exhibition at Durham University’s Palace Green Library.

(11 Jun 2018) » More about Exhibition tells the story of 17th Century Scottish soldiers


Durham University climbs in world university rankings

Durham University has climbed to 74th in the world in the latest global university rankings.

The University moved up four places overall from 78th last year in the QS World University Rankings 2019.

The increase puts Durham in the top eight per cent of 1,011 global higher education institutions ranked, according to the QS.

(6 Jun 2018) » More about Durham University climbs in world university rankings


Discovering how humans can see with sound

Lore and student Josefina wear earphones and talk into foam covered microphones

Human echolocation enables people to ‘see’ with their ears and build a picture of the world around them. The technique involves making sharp mouth clicks and then translating the sound reflected by surrounding objects into spatial information – a method also used by whales, dolphins and bats.

(5 Jun 2018) » More about discovering how humans can see with sound


Durham University and Northumbrian Water sign partnership to tackle water challenges

Durham University and Northumbrian Water have joined together to help tackle water-related challenges and opportunities affecting society and the environment.

(21 May 2018) » More about Durham University and Northumbrian Water sign partnership to tackle water challenges


Seventeenth Century Scottish soldiers reburied in Durham

The remains of Seventeenth Century Scottish soldiers, discovered during construction work at the University’s Palace Green Library in 2013, have been reburied in Durham City.

(18 May 2018) » More about Seventeenth Century Scottish soldiers reburied in Durham


Could a Multiverse be hospitable to life?

A Multiverse – where our Universe is only one of many – might not be as inhospitable to life as previously thought, according to new research.

Could a Multiverse be hospitable to life?

(14 May 2018) » More about Could a Multiverse be hospitable to life?


Universities combine in £3.9m scheme to connect businesses with research

North East England’s universities are joining forces under a £3.9m scheme to connect the region’s businesses with research to encourage growth and job creation.

(3 May 2018) » More about Universities combine in £3.9m scheme to connect businesses with research


Hungry birds as climate change drives food mismatch

Warmer springs create a mismatch where hungry chicks hatch too late to feast on abundant caterpillars, new research shows.

(23 Apr 2018) » More about Hungry birds as climate change drives food mismatch


High number of barriers in Europe’s rivers could hinder fish migration

The density of barriers in European rivers is much higher than indicated by available databases – up to one barrier in every kilometre of river, according to a new study.

(20 Apr 2018) » More about High number of barriers in Europe’s rivers could hinder fish migration


Research into manufacture of life-saving drug wins industry-sponsored award

Durham University chemists have won a national award for research that could increase the availability of an effective treatment for a strain of meningitis in less developed countries.

(10 Apr 2018) » More about Research into manufacture of life-saving drug wins industry-sponsored award


Dark matter might not be interactive after all

Astronomers are back in the dark about what dark matter might be, after new observations showed the mysterious substance may not be interacting with forces other than gravity after all.

(6 Apr 2018) » More about Dark matter might not be interactive after all


Universities unite to boost regional economy

Durham University is leading a new project which will see the North East of England’s universities join forces to commercialise research and boost the region’s economy, with £4.9m in Government funding from the Connecting Capability Fund (CCF).

(29 Mar 2018) » More about Universities unite to boost regional economy


Schools could play a vital role to help prevent mental health problems in young people

More needs to be done to provide guidance and support in schools to prevent mental health problems in young people according to a new report.

(23 Nov 2017) » More about schools could play a vital role to help prevent mental health problems in young people


Durham Law School tackles unacceptable working practices

According to the UN’s International Labour Organization (ILO), only one quarter of workers worldwide has a stable employment relationship.

(19 Oct 2017) » More about Durham Law School tackles unacceptable working practices


How telescope technology is helping treat heart disease

Research using space telescope technology that has ultimately led to better treatments for heart patients has won international recognition.

(17 Oct 2017) » More about how telescope technology is helping treat heart disease


Reformation Rebels: The surprising histories of Benedictine monks in exile

Monks in Motion

Sixteenth and seventeenth century Benedictine monks refused abstinence, died in duels, went off to war and spread illegal Catholic doctrine, a new study has revealed.

(31 Aug 2017) » More about Reformation Rebels: The surprising histories of Benedictine monks in exile


Calling time on the kissing bugs

They are known as ‘kissing bugs’ and they spread a disease that rarely makes the headlines but infects up to seven million people worldwide.

(21 Jul 2017) » More about calling time on the kissing bugs


Women have to ‘prove they are sports fans’

Female sports fans struggle to be taken seriously and feel they are regarded as being less committed than male fans, according to research by Dr Stacey Pope, who answers some questions about her findings below.

(14 Jul 2017) » More about women have to ‘prove they are sports fans’


Durham appoints new Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Global)

Durham University has appointed its first Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Global) following a competitive recruitment process. 

(6 Jul 2017) » More about Durham appoints new Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Global)


Outstanding recognition for Durham University's scientists

Durham University’s outstanding achievements in science have been recognised with a series of awards.

(30 Jun 2017) » More about outstanding recognition for Durham University's scientists


From ashtrays full of cigarette butts to smoke-free environments

This week, it will be ten years since the smoking ban for enclosed workplaces in the UK came into force. Dr Andrew Russell from the Life of Breath research project takes a look at how things have changed.

(28 Jun 2017) » More about from ashtrays full of cigarette butts to smoke-free environments


Durham ranked in world’s top 100 universities

Durham University’s position among the world’s leading universities has been confirmed once more, with the publication of the Times Higher Education World Reputation Rankings 2017.

(14 Jun 2017) » More about Durham ranked in world’s top 100 universities


Post-election 2017 – Durham University expertise

A selection of Durham University experts who are available for comment to the media on a variety of post-election issues.

(9 Jun 2017) » More about Post-election 2017 – Durham University expertise


Geography professors honoured for outstanding achievements

Two of Durham University’s geographers have been honoured for their outstanding achievements by the Royal Geographical Society (RGS).

(5 Jun 2017) » More about Geography professors honoured for outstanding achievements


Pioneering work in chemistry receives prestigious recognition

Professor Jas Pal Badyal FRS from Durham University has been named as the Royal Society of Chemistry Tilden Prize winner for 2017 for his pioneering work on the functionalization of solid surfaces and deposition of nanocoatings.

(9 May 2017) » More about pioneering work in chemistry receives prestigious recognition


Simulated galaxies provide fresh evidence of dark matter

A simulated galaxy is pictured, showing the main ingredients that make up a galaxy: the stars (blue), the gas from which the stars are born (red), and the dark matter halo that surrounds the galaxy (light grey)

Further evidence of the existence of dark matter – the mysterious substance that is believed to hold the Universe together – has been produced by Cosmologists at Durham University.

(21 Apr 2017) » More about Simulated galaxies provide fresh evidence of dark matter


Should primary schools teach philosophy?

Schools are places where children can learn behaviour, skills and attitudes that have lifelong relevance, in addition to subjects on the formal curriculum. Dr Nadia Siddiqui from the School of Education has looked at the contribution philosophy discussions can make to children’s ‘soft’ skills.

(12 Apr 2017) » More about Should primary schools teach philosophy?


Major new Commission launched on creativity and education

Durham University and Arts Council England have announced The Durham Commission on Creativity and Education.

Launching in September 2017, the Commission will investigate what happens when children experience arts and culture, and how this helps them develop and thrive.

(28 Mar 2017) » More about Major new Commission launched on creativity and education


Improving maths knowledge in schools

Low attainment in maths is seen as one of the most serious problems in UK education. Dr Lee Copping from the Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring (CEM) at Durham University tells us more about a project which will dig deeper into the causes.

(6 Mar 2017) » More about improving maths knowledge in schools


Policing domestic abuse

‘Out of court resolutions’, including apologies, are used in domestic abuse cases by all police forces in England, Wales and Northern Ireland despite official guidance advising against their use, according to new research.

(3 Mar 2017) » More about policing domestic abuse


New framework to safeguard children

A new NSPCC national framework to help tackle the issue of harmful sexual behaviour in children and young people is proving beneficial to professionals working in safeguarding. The research of Professor Simon Hackett of Durham University’s School of Applied Social Sciences has strongly influenced the Harmful Sexual Behaviour (HSB) framework of which he is first author.

(27 Feb 2017) » More about New framework to safeguard children


Durham part of new Barnardo’s centre of expertise

Durham University is a partner in a new £7.5m Centre of Expertise on Child Sexual Abuse launched by the UK Home Office and led by Barnardo’s.

(16 Feb 2017) » More about Durham part of new Barnardo’s centre of expertise


Hearing voices and spirituality

Although voice-hearing is often associated with severe mental illness, it can be an important aspect of people’s religious or spiritual life.

This is an area explored in the world’s first major exhibition on hearing voices which enters its final month (February) at Durham University’s Palace Green Library.

(3 Feb 2017) » More about Hearing voices and spirituality


Bill Bryson: I thought Durham was perfect when I first saw it - I still think so now

Bill Bryson

Bill Bryson, the celebrated author and former Chancellor of Durham University, speaks about his enduring love affair with Durham, its Cathedral and its people.

(2 Feb 2017) » More about Bill Bryson: I thought Durham was perfect when I first saw it - I still think so now


Durham University is key to bright future

Place of Light

Professor Stuart Corbridge, Vice-Chancellor of Durham University, explores how the University is key to the economic success of County Durham and North East England.

(9 Jan 2017) » More about Durham University is key to bright future


Fusion energy could be the future

Fusion energy offers the tantalising possibility of clean, sustainable and almost limitless energy. But can it be an economically viable option?

Professor Damian Hampshire talks about fusion energy, suggesting it could be economically viable.

(20 Sep 2015) » More about Fusion energy could be the future


Low cost ethical loans for postgraduate study

Durham University has launched an innovative postgraduate loan product to help to attract the most talented students to further study after they finish their undergraduate degree.

FundED: Future Focussed Postgraduate Loans

(20 Sep 2015) » More about Low cost ethical loans for postgraduate study


Skeletons found in mass graves are 17th Century Scottish soldiers

New analysis carried out on skeletons discovered in a centuries-old mass grave in Durham, UK, has led experts to conclude they are the remains of Scottish soldiers taken prisoner after the 1650 Battle of Dunbar.

(2 Sep 2015) » More about Skeletons found in mass graves are 17th Century Scottish soldiers


International focus on Magna Carta exhibition

Eight hundred years on from when it was first written, the enduring legacy of one of the world’s most important documents lives on.

Dr Christian Liddy and Canon Rosalind Brown talk about the significance of the Magna Carta.

(31 Aug 2015) » More about International focus on Magna Carta exhibition


Is there life out there?

Humans have long wondered: “Are we alone in the Universe?”

After all, the Earth is just one planet in one galaxy among hundreds of billions that exist across the cosmos.

 

Dr Pratika Dayal asks if there is life out there

(31 Aug 2015) » More about Is there life out there?


Understanding landslide risk in post-earthquake Nepal

In April 2015 parts of Nepal were devastated by an intense earthquake and significant aftershocks. But the danger to human life and livelihoods doesn’t end when the ground stops shaking. Earthquake-triggered landslides present an immediate and long-term threat in mountain environments, compounding the difficulties for those affected.

Developing early warning systems for vulnerable communities: Research at Durham University

(31 Aug 2015) » More about Understanding landslide risk in post-earthquake Nepal