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Durham University

Research & business

Latest Research

Impact of lead in children of Roman Empire

Researchers from our Department of Archaeology have found for the first time that widespread use of lead in Roman culture was one of the main contributing factors to childhood death and illness throughout the Roman Empire. 

(17 Jun 2021) » More about Impact of lead in children of Roman Empire


Introducing the handheld sensors that can ‘smell’ Covid-19

Research involving Durham has found that electronic sensors can detect the distinct odour of Covid-19 with almost 100 per cent accuracy.

(13 Jun 2021) » More about Introducing the handheld sensors that can ‘smell’ Covid-19


Durham Professors win prestigious Royal Society of Chemistry awards

Professor Jan Verlet and Professor Jonathan Steed from our Department of Chemistry have been named the winners of Royal Society of Chemistry’s highly-admired Corday-Morgan Prize and Tilden Prize, respectively. 

(10 Jun 2021) » More about Durham Professors win prestigious Royal Society of Chemistry awards


Private schools receive more investment per pupil

a book

A new report by Dr. Sol Gamsu analyses a sample of private schools in England and exposes inequalities in the schooling system.

(10 Jun 2021) » More about Private schools receive more investment per pupil


Does a mother’s stress and depression affect how her unborn baby moves?

New research from our Psychology and Mathematical Sciences departments found that stress and/or depression during pregnancy, affects how much unborn babies touch and engage in the womb.

(9 Jun 2021) » More about Does a mother’s stress and depression affect how her unborn baby moves?


Astronomers apply their skills to cancer research

You might not think that studying the universe could benefit research into serious illnesses like cancer, but Durham’s astronomers have joined forces with cancer researchers to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

(6 Jun 2021) » More about Astronomers apply their skills to cancer research


Developed in Durham: Magnitude Biosciences

people standing next to each other

Magnitude Biosciences is a specialist Contract Research Organisation (CRO) founded in 2018 as a Durham university spin out by life sciences expert Dr David Weinkove and physicist Dr Christopher Saunter.

(4 Jun 2021) » More about Developed in Durham: Magnitude Biosciences


Can echolocation help people with vision loss?

visually impaired man in his apartment

Known as nature’s own sonar system, echolocation occurs when an animal emits a sound that bounces off objects in the environment, returning echoes that provide information about the surrounding space.

(3 Jun 2021) » More about Can echolocation help people with vision loss?


Counting down to the COP26 climate change summit

Climate change banner reading one world

Welcome to the first in our monthly ‘Countdown to COP’ series, where we will be exploring climate change research, events and expertise across our University ahead of the next COP climate change summit in November.

(3 Jun 2021) » More about Counting down to the COP26 climate change summit


Can the height of your house reduce malaria?

mosquito

Whilst we think of the home as a sanctuary, in Africa, around 80% of malaria bites occur indoors at night. Preventing mosquitoes from getting indoors is a simple way of protecting people from this often lethal disease.

(26 May 2021) » More about Can the height of your house reduce malaria?


Meet the dogs that can sniff out Covid-19

Asher may just look like a cute cuddly dog but he is much more than that.

He, along with some of his canine friends, have been trained to sniff out Covid-19 in people and the initial results show they can do it very reliably.

(24 May 2021) » More about Meet the dogs that can sniff out Covid-19


Mapping the universe in 3D

We’ve helped design and build a new telescope instrument that aims to create the most extensive 3D map of the universe ever attempted.

(17 May 2021) » More about Mapping the universe in 3D


Supporting business through astronomy

Durham’s astronomers and cosmologists are increasingly sharing their knowledge and expertise to support business.

(13 May 2021) » More about Supporting business through astronomy


Furthering the exploration of space

Durham’s researchers are helping to build some of the world’s most powerful new telescopes to further our exploration of space.

(12 May 2021) » More about Furthering the exploration of space


A bus journey to the stars!

Dr David Rosario is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in our Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics. An Indian national, born and brought up in Qatar, he lived and worked in the USA and Germany before joining Durham in 2015. Here he tells how a short bus journey began a long-lasting relationship with Durham University.

Astronomy and Cosmology at Durham – Dr David Rosario

(11 May 2021) » More about A bus journey to the stars!


Building a universe in a supercomputer

You can’t physically crash a planet into another planet in a lab to see what happens or look quite far enough back in time to see how the universe might have formed. So what do you do?

The EAGLE Project. Simulating the universe

(11 May 2021) » More about Building a universe in a supercomputer


How giant radio telescopes will tell us more about black holes

Dr Leah Morabito, in our Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, is a leading figure in two international radio telescope projects that will help us see more of the universe and give us new insight into distant galaxies and black holes. Find out more about Leah’s story.

(11 May 2021) » More about How giant radio telescopes will tell us more about black holes


Impacting life on Earth

Our Astronomy and Cosmology research is having an impact on life here on Earth.

(11 May 2021) » More about Impacting life on Earth


A world leader in Astronomy and Cosmology

Astronomy and Cosmology at Durham University

We’re a world leader in Astronomy and Cosmology and our students are taught by some of the best researchers in their field.

(10 May 2021) » More about A world leader in Astronomy and Cosmology


At the forefront of space research

We’re at the forefront of research that is furthering our understanding of the universe and the exploration of space.

(10 May 2021) » More about At the forefront of space research


Climate change and wildlife conservation across the Americas

flying flamingos

A continental-scale network of conservation sites is likely to remain effective under future climate change scenarios, despite a predicted shift in key species distributions.

(4 May 2021) » More about Climate change and wildlife conservation across the Americas


Can bad weather really cause headaches?

In this article, Professor Amanda Ellison explores the connection between headaches and the weather, and explains how to reduce the impact that headaches have on our daily lives. 

(30 Apr 2021) » More about Can bad weather really cause headaches?


Award for next generation science leaders

We’ve benefited from a share of £5.7m in funding to support the next generation of science leaders to research the evolution of stars and the decay of subatomic particles.

(27 Apr 2021) » More about Award for next generation science leaders


Durham to support Church of England in ambitious decarbonisation plan

Image of Durham Cathedral

The Church of England will be supported in their ambitious aim of achieving net-zero carbon by 2030 through a new partnership with Durham Energy Institute (DEI).

(27 Apr 2021) » More about Durham to support Church of England in ambitious decarbonisation plan


What does Britain's new Cyber Force mean for the future of cyber security?

a laptop

Dr Andrew Dwyer from our Department of Geography, and Dr Joe Devanny – deputy director of the Centre for Defence Studies in the Department of War Studies (King’s College London) – discuss how the success of the new UK National Cyber Force (NCF) will be determined by the quality of the leadership, strategy, structures and processes that shape its growth and operational use.

(26 Apr 2021) » More about What does Britain's new Cyber Force mean for the future of cyber security?


Black holes to dark matter – an evolving universe

From supermassive black holes to the hunt for dark matter, Durham’s scientists are at the forefront of investigations into the evolution of the universe.

(23 Apr 2021) » More about Black holes to dark matter – an evolving universe


Durham among first to use Hubble successor

Durham’s astronomers are playing a key role in the biggest scientific programme to be carried out on the new successor to the Hubble Space Telescope.

(19 Apr 2021) » More about Durham among first to use Hubble successor


Melting ice sheets caused sea levels to rise up to 18 metres

an iceberg

Research led by our geography department has found that previous ice loss events caused sea-levels to rise around 3.6 metres per century, offering vital clues as to what lies ahead should climate change continue.

(8 Apr 2021) » More about Melting ice sheets caused sea levels to rise up to 18 metres


Sexually violent pornography regularly advertised to first time users

Person at a computer

Sexually violent pornography is being regularly promoted to first-time visitors on the landing pages of the UK’s most popular pornography websites, finds the largest study of online pornographic content to date.

(4 Apr 2021) » More about Sexually violent pornography regularly advertised to first time users


Tracking garden songbirds this spring

Image of a blue tit

Researchers from our Department of Biosciences have launched a new project to help track the variety and distribution of garden songbirds this spring.

(30 Mar 2021) » More about Tracking garden songbirds this spring


How to read numbers

globe on foliage cut into numbers

To answer some of life’s questions, we often rely on numbers. How we hear about these numbers though, is often through the media. The problem with this is that the way the media uses numbers isn’t particularly reliable.

A lot of the time, numbers are misunderstood, misrepresented, or misused.

This is all insight from a new book and accompanying campaign, ‘How to Read Numbers’ by Assistant Professor in Economics Dr David Chivers and cousin Tom Chivers, a journalist at UnHerd.

(25 Mar 2021) » More about How to read numbers


Spanish cinema expert appointed honorary vice-consul

A Durham University professor, who is an expert in Spanish cinema and culture, has been appointed to the prestigious post of Honorary Vice-Consul.

(25 Mar 2021) » More about Spanish cinema expert appointed honorary vice-consul


Fellowship for world-class scholar

Image of Professor Beng Huat See

As a world Top 100 university, we are proud to be home to academics who are acclaimed experts in their fields.

(18 Mar 2021) » More about Fellowship for world-class scholar


What bonobos could tell us about adoption in humans

We’re part of an international team that has seen the first evidence of wild bonobo apes adopting infants who were born outside of their social group.

(18 Mar 2021) » More about What bonobos could tell us about adoption in humans


Medieval parchment worn as ‘birthing girdle’ during labour

medieval parchment

A 500-year-old parchment birthing girdle could give us more insight into childbirth for medieval mothers.

(12 Mar 2021) » More about Medieval parchment worn as ‘birthing girdle’ during labour


Impact of ultra-thin dolls on girls’ body image

What was your favourite childhood toy? A car? A teddy bear? A doll? Many of us have fond memories of playing with dolls: dressing them up, combing their hair or doing some kind of role play with other toys.

(11 Mar 2021) » More about Impact of ultra-thin dolls on girls’ body image


Durham-based supercomputer helps tackle Covid

Durham-based supercomputer to help research Covid-19 and Artificial Intelligence

We’re proud to host a new £3.8m supercomputer that is being used to better understand Covid-19 and how to recover from the pandemic.

(8 Mar 2021) » More about Durham-based supercomputer helps tackle Covid


Durham subjects ranked among the world’s best

People sitting around a bench

We have once again been named as one of the world’s leading universities across a number of our subjects in the latest edition of the world’s most-consulted university rankings.

(4 Mar 2021) » More about Durham subjects ranked among the world’s best


Supporting the local creative community

Durham Cathedral on the river Wear

Creative Fuse North East at the Business School is a multi-year project aimed at supporting County Durham’s creative economy. Over the last six months, the project has brought together local small businesses, freelancers and practitioners within the creative, cultural and digital sectors to form a dynamic and inclusive community of learning.

(26 Feb 2021) » More about Supporting the local creative community


How can Computer Science help match transplant patients with donors?

Worldwide, thousands of patients require a kidney transplant. Some patients may have a friend or relative willing to donate a kidney but blood- and tissue-type problems may make that donation impossible.

(24 Feb 2021) » More about How can Computer Science help match transplant patients with donors?


Does banning junk food ads work?

Box of donuts wrapped in a locked chain

PhD Candidate Aarron Toal on the psychology behind our cravings.

In 2020, the UK Government announced a ban on junk food advertising before 9pm. This followed the ban on in-store deals like ‘buy one get one free’ on unhealthy foods. There are also restrictions on where promotions can be placed in-store for foods high in fat, salt and sugar, such as those chocolate bars you sneakily add to your basket at checkouts.

(22 Feb 2021) » More about Does banning junk food ads work?


Testing regularly, staying safe and protecting others

Since January, our students and staff have taken over 5,000 lateral Flow Tests, and our pioneering testing programme is continuing to help stop the spread of Covid-19, protecting our University and local community.

(22 Feb 2021) » More about Testing regularly, staying safe and protecting others


Starry night or black holes?

Our astronomers have helped make a huge map of the night sky showing more than 25,000 active supermassive black holes in distant galaxies.

(19 Feb 2021) » More about Starry night or black holes?


Solving a 100 year-old maths puzzle

Image of square peg in round hole

For 100 years mathematicians have been trying to solve the question of whether it is possible to fit all four points of a rectangle into any given closed curve shape. Or, more bluntly, can you fit a square peg into a round hole?

(17 Feb 2021) » More about Solving a 100 year-old maths puzzle


How has the pandemic impacted our wellbeing?

New research from Professor Roger Gill, helps us to understand the impact of ongoing Covid-19 restrictions on mental health and wellbeing. The study, delivered in partnership with Professor Matt Grawitch and colleagues at St Louis University in Missouri, surveyed people living and working across the UK, France, Germany, Canada and the US.

(16 Feb 2021) » More about How has the pandemic impacted our wellbeing?


Why we're obsessed with music from our youth

In this article, Dr Kelly Jakubowski from our Department of Music explores how music is closely linked with memory and emotion.

(12 Feb 2021) » More about Why we're obsessed with music from our youth


Human borders threaten wildlife as climate changes

Human-made borders like the USA-Mexico border wall could make it difficult for almost 700 mammal species to adapt to climate change.

(9 Feb 2021) » More about Human borders threaten wildlife as climate changes


Lockdown sees increased demand for male domestic abuse support

Man looking out window

New research by our Department of Sociology shows that calls for help from male domestic abuse victims have rocketed during lockdown and, behind closed doors, many are facing challenges that will continue long after social isolation ends.

(9 Feb 2021) » More about Lockdown sees increased demand for male domestic abuse support


Supporting people with dementia to live well

Recent figures suggest that around 850,000 people in the UK are living with dementia, expected to rise to one million by 2025.

Now, our health researchers are developing a new programme to support people living with dementia.

(1 Feb 2021) » More about Supporting people with dementia to live well


Durham in Top 25 of most international universities

We’ve been named as one of the world’s most international universities by the Times Higher Education (THE).

(29 Jan 2021) » More about Durham in Top 25 of most international universities


Did dogs join us in settling the Americas?

Siberian husky

Dogs are regarded as our best friend and now our researchers say the first people to settle in the Americas brought their canines with them.

(26 Jan 2021) » More about Did dogs join us in settling the Americas?


Investigating impact of human activity on birds

Our scientists have shown where bird species would exist in the absence of human activity under research that could provide a new approach to setting conservation priorities.

(25 Jan 2021) » More about Investigating impact of human activity on birds


Customers prefer robots to be human-like

New Business School research has found customers prefer robots to have human-like characteristics when dealing with them in customer service settings, e.g. in banking, hotel receptions and when providing information. Customers prefer robots to have a human voice, show emotions, and physical embody a human not a robot.

(20 Jan 2021) » More about Customers prefer robots to be human-like


Why some people report ‘hearing the dead’

Spiritualist mediums might be more prone to immersive mental activities and unusual auditory experiences early in life, our researchers have found.

(18 Jan 2021) » More about Why some people report ‘hearing the dead’


'Happy' and 'sad' music differs across cultures

Whether they make us feel happy or sad, songs inspire emotions in all of us. New research by our Music experts has shown that what you feel could depend on your cultural background.

(14 Jan 2021) » More about 'Happy' and 'sad' music differs across cultures


Bolder approach to Higher Education admissions needed

Universities should be bolder in how they use contextual data when making decisions about admitting prospective students, according to a new report by education experts at Durham.

(14 Jan 2021) » More about Bolder approach to Higher Education admissions needed


Ancient DNA reveals secrets of Game of Thrones wolves

For fans of the TV show Game of Thrones, dire wolves are often seen as mysterious iconic legends.

(13 Jan 2021) » More about Ancient DNA reveals secrets of Game of Thrones wolves


Galaxy mergers could limit star formation

Our astronomers have looked nine billion years into the past to find evidence that galaxy mergers in the early universe could shut down star formation and affect galaxy growth.

(11 Jan 2021) » More about Galaxy mergers could limit star formation


Durham honours inspirational physicist

We are saddened to hear of the death of Professor Sir Arnold Wolfendale, one of the finest physicists of his generation and an inspirational teacher to generations of our students.

(4 Jan 2021) » More about Durham honours inspirational physicist


How our brains help us find misplaced objects

Have you ever wondered how we remember the last place we saw our car keys or other objects like mobile phones and glasses?

(21 Dec 2020) » More about How our brains help us find misplaced objects


More than a million barriers on Europe’s rivers

Fresh water ecosystems can be adversely affected by barriers to the flow of water and a new study suggests that Europe’s river system is particularly badly affected.

(17 Dec 2020) » More about More than a million barriers on Europe’s rivers


Transforming our understanding of voice-hearing

Durham University researchers are changing the way people think about experiences of hearing voices.

(4 Dec 2020) » More about transforming our understanding of voice-hearing


Unlocking the mystery of the Moon’s formation

Supercomputer simulations could unlock mystery of Moon’s formation

We’re using supercomputer simulations to see how the Moon might have formed following a huge collision involving the early Earth 4.5 billion years ago.

(4 Dec 2020) » More about Unlocking the mystery of the Moon’s formation


Award for research that could revolutionise computing

Professor Charles Adams

As the world becomes ever more dependent on imaging, computers and communication, research by our physicists could help revolutionise how these technologies work.

(3 Dec 2020) » More about Award for research that could revolutionise computing


Heating our homes with hydrogen

Gas pipe

Our research is supporting a new project that could see hydrogen become the future heat source for homes and provide green energy to industry.

(2 Dec 2020) » More about Heating our homes with hydrogen


Keeping sleeping babies safe

Is he a good sleeper? Does she sleep through the night yet? These are common questions new parents are asked about their babies.

(27 Nov 2020) » More about Keeping sleeping babies safe


Creating knowledge across disciplinary boundaries

From the study of silkworms to understanding gravity waves to designing human knee implants, collaborating across different disciplines in research is a common way of working for academics. At Durham, we pride ourselves on this kind of work.

(20 Nov 2020) » More about Creating knowledge across disciplinary boundaries


Durham researchers named among best in world

Four of our professors have been named among the world’s best for the quality and influence of their work, highlighting the global strength of Durham’s research.

(20 Nov 2020) » More about Durham researchers named among best in world


Using big data to fight Covid-19

Graphic showing the Covid-19 virus

Our particle physics and cosmology research students are using their knowledge of maths and big data in the fight against Covid-19.

(9 Nov 2020) » More about Using big data to fight Covid-19


Easier way to create biodiesel developed

Our researchers have developed a new way to turn the rubbish we throw away into chemicals that can help make fuel, medicines, fertilisers and biodegradable packaging.

(4 Nov 2020) » More about Easier way to create biodiesel developed


Covid-19 technologies must be regulated

Technologies such as track and trace apps, used to halt the spread of Covid-19, have to be thoroughly examined and regulated before they are rolled out for wider adoption to ensure they do not normalise a big-brother-like society post-Covid-19, according to Dr Jeremy Aroles.

(2 Nov 2020) » More about Covid-19 technologies must be regulated


Recognition for our dedication to diversity in tech

Our efforts to make tech industries more diverse are going from strength to strength.

(2 Nov 2020) » More about Recognition for our dedication to diversity in tech


Arts and Humanities ranked in world top 20

We’re celebrating after Arts and Humanities at Durham was named in the World Top 20 of a prestigious league table.

(28 Oct 2020) » More about Arts and Humanities ranked in world top 20


Bio-detection dogs meet Matt Hancock and HRH The Duchess of Cornwall

Dogs trained to sniff out Covid-19 received a VIP visit for a training demonstration at Paddington Station in Central London.

(28 Oct 2020) » More about Bio-detection dogs meet Matt Hancock and HRH The Duchess of Cornwall


Tackling floods and water waste

Flood warning sign on flooded road

We need to look to nature for help so new homes are resilient to climate change according to a new report to MPs and policymakers.

(20 Oct 2020) » More about Tackling floods and water waste


Psychotic, Incompetent, Greedy or Heroic?

Which boss are you?

An exploration into how popular fiction has shaped modern business management styles has been published this week, by Dr Martyn Griffin of the Business School.

(19 Oct 2020) » More about Psychotic, Incompetent, Greedy or Heroic?


Researching potential e-cigarette risk in pregnancy

Our psychologists say e-cigarettes might not be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy and have called for more awareness of the risks.

(16 Oct 2020) » More about Researching potential e-cigarette risk in pregnancy


Insects provide strategy for sustainable food production

Did you know that each year 1.3billion tonnes of food are wasted? 

(15 Oct 2020) » More about Insects provide strategy for sustainable food production


Changing attitudes to soil health

Hands holding soil

Future generations need to be educated about the crucial role that healthy soil plays in tackling climate change, according to new research.

(14 Oct 2020) » More about Changing attitudes to soil health


Covid-19 testing needed in schools

Daily Covid-19 testing in schools would keep children in full-time education safe, stop mass spread, and keep the economy afloat, according to Professor Abderrahim Taamouti.

(7 Oct 2020) » More about Covid-19 testing needed in schools


Durham theologian supports launch of Pope Francis’ new teachings

One of our leading theologians has spoken alongside Pope Francis at the global launch of his new Papal Encyclical – one of the Pope’s highest forms of communication.

(7 Oct 2020) » More about Durham theologian supports launch of Pope Francis’ new teachings


Law strengthens its global reputation

Did you know that students who join Durham Law School are joining a world top 50 department where they’ll be taught by some of the world’s leading experts?

(6 Oct 2020) » More about Law strengthens its global reputation


Webinar series showcases world class research

Some of the world’s leading academics are discussing their work in a series of webinars organised by Durham University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

(6 Oct 2020) » More about Webinar series showcases world class research


£4.5m to help us futureproof crops

Our research into how crops could be ‘future-proofed’ against climate change to avoid food shortages has been boosted by a major funding award.

(2 Oct 2020) » More about £4.5m to help us futureproof crops


Geophysics research wins international award

One of our leading academics has been honoured for her outstanding achievements and contributions in geosciences.

(1 Oct 2020) » More about Geophysics research wins international award


Investigating the impact of planet collisions

Did you know that Earth could have lost anywhere between 10 and 60 per cent of its atmosphere in the collision that is thought to have formed the Moon?

(30 Sep 2020) » More about Investigating the impact of planet collisions


Nobel class cosmology researcher honoured

A world-leading Durham cosmologist has been recognised as being “of Nobel class” for his work on the evolution of the universe.

(23 Sep 2020) » More about Nobel class cosmology researcher honoured


We’ve doubled our number of female computer science students

Did you know that just 13 per cent of students studying computing, gaming and related degrees in the UK are female? And women only account for 17 per cent of the tech workforce?

(21 Sep 2020) » More about We’ve doubled our number of female computer science students


Five things we’re doing to help prevent the spread of Covid-19

Our ground breaking research has never been so critical during the Covid-19 pandemic. 

(18 Sep 2020) » More about Five things we’re doing to help prevent the spread of Covid-19


Mapping our wasted heat

Have you ever thought about all the wasted heat that’s released into our atmosphere from large factories and power stations?

(17 Sep 2020) » More about Mapping our wasted heat


Royal visit for bio-detection dogs

The Duchess of Cornwall has visited the training centre where trials will take place to determine whether dogs can sniff out Covid-19 in people.

(9 Sep 2020) » More about Royal visit for bio-detection dogs


Durham University in UK top five of prestigious league table

Durham University has risen to fourth in The Guardian University Guide 2021. 

(7 Sep 2020) » More about Durham University in UK top five of prestigious league table


Zooming in on dark matter

Our cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe – which could help us find the real thing in space.

(2 Sep 2020) » More about Zooming in on dark matter


Rationing might be recommended for future pandemics

New research at the Business School has found that rationing could be an effective measure for governments to introduce in future pandemics. This is alongside a number of recommendations revealed by a pioneering forecasting model.

(1 Sep 2020) » More about Rationing might be recommended for future pandemics


Understanding past warming can limit climate change effects

Evidence from Earth’s past warming events should be built into forecasts showing how today’s climate change could affect different species and ecosystems.

(28 Aug 2020) » More about Understanding past warming can limit climate change effects


How effective are primate conservation measures?

With about 60 per cent of the world’s primate species threatened with extinction, conservation efforts are now more important than ever.

(26 Aug 2020) » More about How effective are primate conservation measures?


Migrating bird populations affected by climate and land changes

Changes in climate and habitat on the breeding and non-breeding grounds of migratory birds are both playing an important part in driving their long-term population changes.

(18 Aug 2020) » More about Migrating bird populations affected by climate and land changes


Reporting the atomic bombs and VJ Day

In an era before the internet and smartphones the dropping of the atomic bombs and eventual surrender of Japan on VJ Day was reported in more traditional ways.

(14 Aug 2020) » More about Reporting the atomic bombs and VJ Day


Coffee stains inspire new printing technique

Have you ever spilled your coffee on your desk? You may then have observed one of the most puzzling phenomena of fluid mechanics – the coffee-ring effect.

(13 Aug 2020) » More about Coffee stains inspire new printing technique


World leading scholars honoured

Two of our leading academics have been honoured in recognition of their outstanding contributions to subjects within humanities and social sciences.

(13 Aug 2020) » More about World leading scholars honoured


Britain’s first Viking helmet discovered

A team from our Archaeology Department have been helping to uncover the past of a rare Viking artefact.

(10 Aug 2020) » More about Britain’s first Viking helmet discovered


Enabling researchers to innovate in business

We’re working to create an enabling environment where the inspiring research of our academics can become innovative solutions to economic challenges and needs, both global and local. So we’re excited to announce a new £1.7m (US $2.23m) seed investment fund to support spin-out businesses.

(6 Aug 2020) » More about Enabling researchers to innovate in business


Volunteers needed for Covid-19 detection dog trial

Our researchers who are investigating whether specially trained dogs can sniff out Covid-19 in humans are asking people in England for help with the trial.

(6 Aug 2020) » More about Volunteers needed for Covid-19 detection dog trial


Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis

Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis

Our scientists have found a new way to kill the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB).

(29 Jul 2020) » More about Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis


University spin-out wins prestigious award

A University spin out company been recognised for its pioneering work helping Network Rail to investigate hidden shafts and voids in its tunnels.

(24 Jul 2020) » More about University spin-out wins prestigious award


Nature inspires first manufactured non-cuttable material

Nature inspires first manufactured non-cuttable material

Our engineers have been inspired by nature to create what they say is the first manufactured non-cuttable material.

(20 Jul 2020) » More about Nature inspires first manufactured non-cuttable material


English speakers some of the least likely to wear face masks

Recent research by Professor Sascha Kraus suggests Brits, Americans and other English speakers are some of the least likely to wear face masks and social distance in the world. The only native speakers, researched by the academics, less likely to following health precautions are German speakers.

(17 Jul 2020) » More about English speakers some of the least likely to wear face masks


Why better guidance on school PE is needed

Since lockdown began in England, children have become increasing sedentary with one in fourteen children reported to be doing no daily exercise. 

(17 Jul 2020) » More about why better guidance on school PE is needed


Galaxy evolution research among most cited of past decade

A supercomputer simulation carried out in Durham that realistically calculates the formation of galaxies from the Big Bang to the present day is one of cosmology’s most popular research papers of the past decade.

The EAGLE Project. Simulating the universe

(16 Jul 2020) » More about Galaxy evolution research among most cited of past decade


Study reveals long-term impact of rugby injuries

Rugby players continue to suffer from their high ‘injury load’ after retirement from the sport.

(16 Jul 2020) » More about Study reveals long-term impact of rugby injuries


Revealing the atmospheric impact of planetary collisions

The atmospheric impact of gigantic planetary collisions

Giant impacts have a wide range of consequences for young planets and their atmospheres, according to research led by our scientists.

(15 Jul 2020) » More about Revealing the atmospheric impact of planetary collisions


Report calls for higher education to empower Muslim voices

A fresh debate on future models of university citizenship is called for by a new report, based on a survey of students nationally conducted by Durham and three other universities.

(14 Jul 2020) » More about Report calls for higher education to empower Muslim voices


Positive culture change in family firms

The impact of Covid-19 has forced a drastic positive culture change in family firms, creating stronger solidarity and cohesion within companies, plus increased digitalisation, according to new research at the School.

(10 Jul 2020) » More about Positive culture change in family firms


Baboons do not view researchers as neutral

Baboons who are used to researcher presence are less tolerant than we thought, according to a new study by our anthropologists.

(9 Jul 2020) » More about Baboons do not view researchers as neutral


Reducing racial bias in facial recognition

Our computer scientists are helping to reduce racial bias in facial recognition algorithms.

(9 Jul 2020) » More about Reducing racial bias in facial recognition


Why the term “Super-spreader” can be stigmatising and unhelpful

Emma Cave from Durham Law School considers the impact of the label ‘super-spreader’.

(7 Jul 2020) » More about why the term “Super-spreader” can be stigmatising and unhelpful


Culture dictates how we cope with Covid-19 career impact

Whether we’re more concerned with our own career development or the success of the company is often determined by our culture, research at the School has revealed.

(3 Jul 2020) » More about Culture dictates how we cope with Covid-19 career impact


How we started a #womenintech revolution

Tech Up Women - How far we've come!

In 2019, we launched TechUPWomen, a programme that took 100 women from the north and midlands (UK) and retrained them for a career in technology.

(29 Jun 2020) » More about How we started a #womenintech revolution


Transforming vacuums into ventilators

Dr Joanna Berry talks us through how, when the world was going into lockdown, vacuums were turned into ventilators through an innovative collaboration between people and organisations.

(29 Jun 2020) » More about Transforming vacuums into ventilators


Decarbonising heat research receives over £4 million in funding

We’ve won major funding for three new research projects to decarbonise heat which will significantly reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions.

(26 Jun 2020) » More about Decarbonising heat research receives over £4 million in funding


The Culture of Women in Tech

Dr Mariann Hardey has a new podcast episode out this week with New Books Network. The episode focuses around the culture of women in tech and Dr Hardey’s own experiences in this area.

(26 Jun 2020) » More about The Culture of Women in Tech


How water could trigger earthquakes and volcanoes

We’re investigating if water cycles deep in the Earth play a role in the triggering and strength of earthquakes and volcanoes.

(24 Jun 2020) » More about How water could trigger earthquakes and volcanoes


Testing cheaper than lockdown

Mass testing is the safest way to reopen the economy and society and will cost much less than a hard lockdown, research reveals.

 By Abderrahim Taamouti - June 2020

(22 Jun 2020) » More about Testing cheaper than lockdown


Why do we stare at ourselves on video calls?

Aarron Toal, PhD Candidate, explores why we stare at ourselves on video calls.

(22 Jun 2020) » More about Why do we stare at ourselves on video calls?


How earthquakes shape the landscape

Our geographers have revealed just how large earthquakes can change the physical features of the landscape surrounding them.

(17 Jun 2020) » More about How earthquakes shape the landscape


New Decarbonising Heat successes for Durham

Durham Energy Institute (DEI) has won funding for three major new projects on decarbonising heat.

The projects will develop new technology and processes to decarbonise heating and cooling across residential, business and industry sectors, to significantly reduce UK greenhouse gas emissions.

(17 Jun 2020) » More about Decarbonising Heat


What archaeological records can tell us about historic epidemics

Infectious diseases have been with us since our beginnings as a species. Professor Charlotte Roberts explains what the archaeological record reveals about epidemics throughout history – and the human response to them.

(17 Jun 2020) » More about what archaeological records can tell us about historic epidemics


The future of women’s football is under threat

two women footballers chasing a football

New research by Dr Stacey Pope has found that Covid-19 is impacting men’s and women’s football differently. She and her fellow researchers believe urgent action is required to stop the coronavirus epidemic from destroying the women’s game, as they explain here.

(16 Jun 2020) » More about the future of women’s football is under threat


First space-based measurement of neutron lifetime

Our researchers have helped to find a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time.

(11 Jun 2020) » More about First space-based measurement of neutron lifetime


Black hole’s heart still beating

Black hole heartbeat graphic

The first confirmed heartbeat of a supermassive black hole is still going strong more than ten years after first being observed.

(10 Jun 2020) » More about Black hole’s heart still beating


Durham in world’s top 100 universities

Durham University has again been ranked as a World Top 100 university.

(10 Jun 2020) » More about Durham in world’s top 100 universities


Durham ranked in the UK top ten

Owengate leading to Durham Cathedral

We’ve once again been ranked as one of the UK’s leading universities alongside our standing as a world top 100 university.

(9 Jun 2020) » More about Durham ranked in the UK top ten


New floating energy platforms provide an alternative to fossil fuels

Durham Energy Institute (DEI) researchers are helping to revolutionise renewable energy generation and storage in a project that aims to offer environmentally friendly power generation to coastal communities that don’t have access to reliable grid electricity.

(5 Jun 2020) » More about New floating energy platforms provide an alternative to fossil fuels


Dunkirk: how British newspapers helped to turn defeat into a miracle

As the UK gets ready to mark the 80th Anniversary of the rescue of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) from Dunkirk, Professor Tim Luckhurst, founding Principal of our new South College, looks at how British newspaper journalists were forced to report it from afar.

(29 May 2020) » More about Dunkirk: how British newspapers helped to turn defeat into a miracle


Consumers post-Covid-19

Aarron Toal, from our Business School, explores what the future may hold for consumers after Covid-19.

(22 May 2020) » More about consumers post-Covid-19


Durham world top 50 for number of UN Sustainable Development Goals

Durham Infancy and Sleep Centre. Helping parents and babies sleep better

We’ve been named as one of the world’s top universities for our contribution to a number of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

(21 May 2020) » More about Durham world top 50 for number of UN Sustainable Development Goals


Secrets of famous French painter revealed

The mystery behind a painting by a renowned French post-impressionist may have been revealed by new research that has unearthed secrets from his past.

(18 May 2020) » More about Secrets of famous French painter revealed


Durham academic selected as New Generation Thinker

Dr Noreen Masud has taken up the prestigious role as one of this year’s New Generation Thinkers (NGT) which will see her working with the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and BBC Radio 3. 

(15 May 2020) » More about Durham academic selected as New Generation Thinker


Grief in the time of Covid-19

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought massive changes to our lives including how we say goodbye to our loved ones.

(14 May 2020) » More about grief in the time of Covid-19


How will Covid-19 affect productivity in the UK?

Professor Richard Harris from our Business School uses the 2008-09 recession as a benchmark for assessing the possible impact of Covid-19 on productivity in the UK.

(12 May 2020) » More about how will Covid-19 affect productivity in the UK?


VE day and national thanksgiving in 1945

After Victory in Europe Day (VE Day) on 8 May 1945, thanksgiving services were held in churches throughout Britain and overseas. Philip Williamson, Professor of Modern History, reveals the meticulous planning that went on behind the scenes.

(11 May 2020) » More about VE day and national thanksgiving in 1945


Should we wear face masks?

Claire Horwell in our Department of Earth Sciences and Fiona McDonald in the Faculty of Law at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia, consider the mixed messages behind face mask use during the Covid-19 pandemic.

(5 May 2020) » More about should we wear face masks?


Early career Psychology research wins prestigious award

One of our early career Psychology researchers has been recognised with a prestigious award for her outstanding PhD research.

(1 May 2020) » More about Early career Psychology research wins prestigious award


Largest amount of microplastics found on ocean floor

Our researchers have helped record the highest level of microplastics ever found on the ocean floor – with up to 1.9 million pieces in an area of just one square metre.

(30 Apr 2020) » More about Largest amount of microplastics found on ocean floor


Helium supplies at risk from plunging oil prices

Professor Jon Gluyas from our Durham Energy Institute explains why this is bad news for the coronavirus effort.

(28 Apr 2020) » More about helium supplies at risk from plunging oil prices


Research helps transform coal mine into geothermal heat source

Our research is being used to transform coal mines into multi-million pound renewable energy systems.

(24 Apr 2020) » More about research helps transform coal mine into geothermal heat source


Literary expert honoured

One of our leading academics has been honoured for his contribution to the promotion of English literature.

(21 Apr 2020) » More about Literary expert honoured


Valuing ‘unskilled’ work

Dr Jo McBride from our Business School and Professor Miguel Martínez Lucio from the University of Manchester explain how Covid-19 is changing the way we value “unskilled” work in our society.

(8 Apr 2020) » More about valuing ‘unskilled’ work


The UK Government, businesses and unions are cooperating during Covid-19

Professor Bernd Brandl explains why it is vital that the UK Government, business groups and trade unions continue to cooperate as they tackle the impact of Covid-19.

(6 Apr 2020) » More about the UK Government, businesses and unions are cooperating during Covid-19


Airlines, Covid-19, climate change and risk reporting

Professor Carol Adams examines how airlines have been reporting risk, how global pandemics like Covid-19 fit into this and how this may affect their futures.

(3 Apr 2020) » More about airlines, Covid-19, climate change and risk reporting


How to avoid pension scams and fraud during Covid-19

Dr Anna Tilba suggests how we can protect ourselves against the scams and frauds, which are increasing during Covid-19. 

(3 Apr 2020) » More about how to avoid pension scams and fraud during Covid-19


Geography and Physics research wins over £7million funding

Our Geography and Physics research is among the best in the world and we’ve just received three prestigious awards.

(31 Mar 2020) » More about Geography and Physics research wins over £7million funding


CO₂ emissions are plummeting – here’s how to keep them down

A positive result of the world’s response to Coronavirus, means that CO₂ emissions have been slashed. Professor Simone Abram looks at how we can maintain this environmental benefit.

(27 Mar 2020) » More about CO₂ emissions are plummeting – here’s how to keep them down


Dogs could join fight against Covid-19

New research will look into whether man’s best friend could play a role in preventing the spread of Coronavirus.

(27 Mar 2020) » More about dogs could join fight against Covid-19


The lockdown is a dangerous time for victims of domestic abuse

As the coronavirus lockdown continues in the UK and many other countries Professor Nicole Westmarland and Rosanna Bellini provide a guide on what we need to consider in relation to domestic abuse. 

(26 Mar 2020) » More about the lockdown is a dangerous time for victims of domestic abuse


How to build a universe

How to build a universe

How do you build a universe?

(19 Mar 2020) » More about How to build a universe


Five things to ‘dig’ about heritage at Durham

Our researchers are the history detectives, unearthing exciting things from our past and helping us learn from our ancestors.

(16 Mar 2020) » More about Five things to ‘dig’ about heritage at Durham


The origins of life on Earth challenged in new research

How did life on earth begin? There’s hardly a bigger question, but one of the most commonly held theories has been challenged by new research.

(11 Mar 2020) » More about The origins of life on Earth challenged in new research


Commemorating Basil Bunting and Briggflatts

Did you know that we’re home to the archives of one of Britain’s most distinguished modern poets?

Basil Bunting reading from 'Briggflatts'

(6 Mar 2020) » More about Commemorating Basil Bunting and Briggflatts


Record 19 Durham subjects in world top 100

A record 19 Durham subjects have been named in the top 100 of a major international league table.

(4 Mar 2020) » More about Record 19 Durham subjects in world top 100


Durham welcomes Spanish Consul General

Our work to help bring the vast wealth of Spanish art and culture to the world has been marked by a visit from Spain’s Consul General.

(3 Mar 2020) » More about Durham welcomes Spanish Consul General


Education experts to advise Government

Three of our education experts have been appointed to a Cabinet Panel to help Government decide which policies work and which don’t.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about Education experts to advise Government


Global conservation priorities identified in new research

Environmental conditions, more than human activity, explain why some parts of the globe have more endangered species than others, according to new research.

(20 Feb 2020) » More about Global conservation priorities identified in new research


Durham to host new national supercomputer

We’re hosting a new £3.1m supercomputer facility to address challenges in subjects ranging from Artificial Intelligence to advanced X-ray imaging.

(17 Feb 2020) » More about Durham to host new national supercomputer


Monumental medieval chapel finally uncovered

Our archaeologists have helped uncover the remains of a long lost chapel from Britain’s medieval past.

(17 Feb 2020) » More about Monumental medieval chapel finally uncovered


Meet our Bone Detectives

Person wearing forensic gloves examining a skull

Did you know that our teeth and bones hold many secrets?

(14 Feb 2020) » More about meet our Bone Detectives


Vital rainfall belt at risk from climate change

Our researchers have found that future climate warming could put a tropical rainfall belt relied upon by billions of people at risk

(14 Feb 2020) » More about Vital rainfall belt at risk from climate change


Rare Viking-age board game piece found

Our archaeologists have helped unearth a 1,200 year old board game piece on a small island off the coast of north east England.

(11 Feb 2020) » More about Rare Viking-age board game piece found


Animal spotting project helps double children’s mammal knowledge

A roe deer captured on camera by a MammalWeb motion-sensing camera

A citizen science project we ran in schools has dramatically increased children’s knowledge of UK wild mammals.

(4 Feb 2020) » More about Animal spotting project helps double children’s mammal knowledge


Influential Durham law expert made honorary QC

Influential Durham law expert made honorary QC

A Durham law expert who has championed women in the legal profession and shaped new laws on extreme pornography and upskirting has been appointed an honorary Queen’s Counsel (QC).

(16 Jan 2020) » More about Influential Durham law expert made honorary QC


Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women

Films, adverts and reality TV shows don’t always paint a realistic picture of women’s body shapes but how much influence does TV have on our preferences?

Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women

(19 Dec 2019) » More about Watching TV makes us prefer thinner women


Five cool things about our Cosmology & Astronomy research

Revealing the true colours of quasars

Research at Durham isn’t just confined to life here on Earth.

(17 Dec 2019) » More about Five cool things about our Cosmology & Astronomy research


Sharing our 350-year-old library with the world

We’re proud to be home to the earliest public library in the North East of England, Cosin’s Library, established in 1669 by John Cosin, Bishop of Durham for the benefit of the local community.

(17 Dec 2019) » More about Sharing our 350-year-old library with the world


Enduring interest in the fate of the Scottish Soldiers

In the six years since we found a mass grave of 17th century prisoners on Durham University land, our Scottish Soldiers Archaeology Project has captivated thousands of people across the world.

(16 Dec 2019) » More about Enduring interest in the fate of the Scottish Soldiers


Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected

Animation - Greenland ice losses

Greenland is losing ice seven times faster than in the 1990s, shows a new study by an international research team including Durham University.

(10 Dec 2019) » More about Greenland ice losses rising faster than expected


Durham researchers named among world’s best

At Durham we’ve long had a global reputation for the high standard and impact of our research.

(6 Dec 2019) » More about Durham researchers named among world’s best


Universities ‘should have legal duty’ to fight sexual violence

Anonymous group of male and female students walking

Universities in the UK should have new legal duties to prevent and respond effectively to sexual violence and harassment on campus, according to a survey of selected higher education staff whose views were analysed in a new study.

(5 Dec 2019) » More about universities ‘should have legal duty’ to fight sexual violence


Air pollution and the ethics of recommending facemasks

Record levels of air pollution have been measured in some parts of the world posing a danger to human health.

(27 Nov 2019) » More about Air pollution and the ethics of recommending facemasks


Supporting our technicians

Our technical staff play an important part in our ongoing success, so we’re proud to be supporting our technical community through the Technician Commitment.

(22 Nov 2019) » More about Supporting our technicians


Durham ranked in world top 100 for Physical Sciences

How a simple mesh could clean up oil spills

We’ve once again been ranked in the world top 100 for our strengths in Physical Sciences in an international league table.

(19 Nov 2019) » More about Durham ranked in world top 100 for Physical Sciences


Five thousand eyes on the sky

A cutting-edge new telescope instrument designed and built by an international team including Durham University has taken its first observations of the night sky.

(18 Nov 2019) » More about Five thousand eyes on the sky


India’s National Academy of Sciences honours Durham researcher

One of our leading researchers is to be honoured by India’s oldest science academy.

(18 Nov 2019) » More about India’s National Academy of Sciences honours Durham researcher


National Energy Champion award for geothermal researcher

Research into the potential of using geothermal energy as a low-carbon heat source has won a national award for one of our leading researchers.

(13 Nov 2019) » More about National Energy Champion award for geothermal researcher


Is Planet 9 really a black hole?

Is there a black hole in our solar system?

(10 Oct 2019) » More about Is Planet 9 really a black hole?


Leading social scientists awarded Fellowships of the Academy of Social Sciences

Following an extensive peer review process, five of our academic colleagues have been awarded Fellowships by the Academy of Social Sciences, the UK’s national academy of academics, learned societies and practitioners in the social sciences. They are recognised for the excellence and impact of their work through the use of social science for public benefit. 

(9 Oct 2019) » More about Leading social scientists awarded Fellowships of the Academy of Social Sciences


Should summer-born pupils be treated differently?

Evidence shows that children who are among the youngest in their year at school do less well on average than their autumn-born classmates.

(3 Oct 2019) » More about should summer-born pupils be treated differently?


Durham geothermal energy expertise at UK Conservative Party conference

Delegates at the UK Conservative Party annual conference have heard how Durham’s research could provide a long-term, sustainable source of low-carbon energy.

Shaping the Future of Energy - Interview with Prof. Jon Gluyas, Director Durham Energy Institute

(2 Oct 2019) » More about Durham geothermal energy expertise at UK Conservative Party conference


Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research

We’re leading a national research project to decarbonise transport through hydrogen-fuelled vehicles and technology.

(30 Sep 2019) » More about Durham UK lead on hydrogen fuel research


Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on East Antarctic Ice Sheet

More than 65,000 meltwater lakes have been discovered on the edge of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet by our researchers.

(25 Sep 2019) » More about Thousands of meltwater lakes mapped on East Antarctic Ice Sheet


New enterprise zone to work with industry

How a simple mesh could clean up oil spills

From developing a mesh coating that could help clean up oil spills to finding greener energy alternatives, our research is really making a difference.


Now, we’ve been awarded over £1.4m to develop premises in the North East of England for businesses where they can collaborate with our world-leading research experts.

(20 Sep 2019) » More about New enterprise zone to work with industry


Recognition for rising stars of research

Two pioneering researchers - one who is improving telescope images of space and the other studying the environmentally damaging practice of sand mining - have received national recognition for their work.

(20 Sep 2019) » More about recognition for rising stars of research


Why humans take so long to grow up

Why do our children take so long to grow up, compared to other animals?

(18 Sep 2019) » More about why humans take so long to grow up


The heat beneath our feet

Old coal mines could provide us with a source of low-carbon heat for many years to come, according to geothermal energy expert Dr Charlotte Adams, who is the new President of the Geology section at the British Science Association.

Here, Charlotte, who is a member of our Durham Energy Institute, explains more about her research into how water stored in flooded abandoned mines could provide cleaner energy for homes and businesses.

(17 Sep 2019) » More about The heat beneath our feet


Support for voice-hearers goes online

People who hear voices, their families and mental health professionals will benefit from a new information and support website based on research by Durham University.

(11 Sep 2019) » More about Support for voice-hearers goes online


Five cool things about our environmental research

How three students are trying to reduce the plastic mountain

From decarbonising heat to food security and water sustainability, we’re working to bring about improvements that will benefit nature and the well-being of the planet.

(5 Sep 2019) » More about Five cool things about our environmental research


A new home for the archive of ‘Radical Jack’

Opening up the archives of Radical Jack

A political firebrand, a radical reformist and a leading society figure – the life and times of John George Lambton, first Earl of Durham, were truly captivating.

Durham University is now the new home to the archives of Lord Durham, as he was also known, whose energetic support for political reform earned him the nickname ‘Radical Jack’.

(30 Aug 2019) » More about A new home for the archive of ‘Radical Jack’


Smart surfaces as a solution to global challenges

Professor Jas Pal Badyal, a Fellow of the Royal Society, is widely considered a leader in the field of surface science. Here he talks about the students in his team, their inventions and tackling global challenges.

(22 Aug 2019) » More about smart surfaces as a solution to global challenges


Keeping Africa moving in a changing climate

Durham’s engineers are working with partners in Africa to find ways to use cheaper and more sustainable local materials to build all-weather, low-traffic roads and railway lines.

(21 Aug 2019) » More about Keeping Africa moving in a changing climate


Revealing quasars’ true colours

Revealing the true colours of quasars

Our astronomers have identified a rare moment in the life of some of the universe’s most energetic objects.

(7 Aug 2019) » More about Revealing quasars’ true colours


Malaysian Minister of Education visits Durham

The University has hosted a visit by the Malaysian Minister of Education to celebrate a new partnership that will see an important collection of diplomatic papers digitised for study in South East Asia.

(26 Jul 2019) » More about Malaysian Minister of Education visits Durham


Prestigious fellowships awarded to two academics

We’re celebrating after two of our academics were awarded Fellowships by the British Academy, the UK’s national academy for the humanities and social sciences.

(23 Jul 2019) » More about Prestigious fellowships awarded to two academics


Measuring the expanding universe

Our physicists will help create a 3D map of galaxies to learn more about the universe’s accelerating expansion.

(17 Jul 2019) » More about Measuring the expanding universe


Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity

Einstein’s theory of General Relativity is world famous – but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form.

(8 Jul 2019) » More about Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity


How a tiny bug inspires surfaces that don’t get wet

A tiny bug is the inspiration for research that could one day provide clean water or help ships sail more efficiently.

(5 Jul 2019) » More about How a tiny bug inspires surfaces that don’t get wet


Celebrating women who make a difference

At Durham we’re proud to be home to incredible women who are making a difference in the world.

(3 Jul 2019) » More about Celebrating women who make a difference


Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction

Women in Nepal are having a say in how to reduce the risk of disasters like fires and landslides.

Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction

(3 Jul 2019) » More about Giving women a voice in disaster risk reduction


Celebrating world class arts and humanities

Performances from a poet, a playwright and a musician were part of our annual research showcase for arts and humanities at Durham, a subject area ranked in the world top 30.

(2 Jul 2019) » More about celebrating world class arts and humanities


How unwanted sexual images are shattering lives

Imagine if you had a sexual image of yourself shared online without your consent. Sadly, this happens all too often and can be absolutely devastating for the victim.

(1 Jul 2019) » More about How unwanted sexual images are shattering lives


Permanent headstone marks Scottish soldiers resting place

The headstone has been installed at the grave of the 17th Century Scottish soldiers buried in Durham City, providing a permanent marker of their resting place. 

(28 Jun 2019) » More about Permanent headstone marks Scottish soldiers resting place


Reducing the plastic mountain

Every single minute, a truck load of plastic ends up in our oceans, killing millions of animals every year. This is only going to get worse unless we do something about it.

How three students are trying to reduce the plastic mountain

(26 Jun 2019) » More about Reducing the plastic mountain


Reviving the music of great composers

We’re helping to bring the forgotten music of two great classical composers back to life.

Bringing the works of great composers back to life

(26 Jun 2019) » More about Reviving the music of great composers