Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Research

Research lectures, seminars and events

The events listed in this area are research seminars, workshops and lectures hosted by Durham University departments and research institutes. If you are not a member of the University, but  wish to enquire about attending one of the events please contact the organiser or host department.


 

October 2017
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
September 2017 November 2017
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

Events for 20 October 2017

Peter West: E theory

1:00pm, CM221

I will propose a low energy effective action of string and branes which possess a
very large Kac-Moody symmetry (E11). The equations of motion are essentially
determined by this symmetry and one finds that this single unififed theory contains the maximal
supergravity theories in all dimensions and also all the gauged maximal supergravity theories.

Contact daniele.dorigoni@durham.ac.uk, jyotirmoy.bhattacharya@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.


Konstantinos Gourgouliatos: Centrifugal Instability

2:00pm, CM219

Motivated by astrophysical relativistic jets with curved streamlines, we study the onset and the evolution of the Relativistic Centrifugal Instability (RCFI). As a first step, we study axisymmetric rotating flows, where the density and angular velocity change discontinuously at a given radius. Following the original physical argument of Lord Rayleigh, we derive the relativistic version of the Rayleigh criterion for this problem and use axially symmetric computer simulations to verify its predictions. The inclusion of a uniform axial magnetic field can suppress the centrifugal instability for low flow velocities. However, in highly relativistic flows, such a field is no longer in equilibrium because of the electric field induced, and needs to be balanced by some extra pressure. This extra pressure term, in general, destabilises the flow.

Contact david.bourne@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.