Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Durham University

Research & business

View Profile

Mr Brian Snowdon, BA, MA

Assistant Professor (Teaching) in Economics in the Business School
Telephone: +44 (0) 191 33 46336
Room number: MHL 343

Contact Mr Brian Snowdon (email at brian.snowdon@durham.ac.uk)

Biography

Prior to joining the School in 2008, Brian taught at Northumbria University where, before retiring, he was Professor of Economics and International Business. Brian has also worked for the Open University and was a Visiting Professor of Economics at Old Dominion University, Virginia, USA in 1990.

He has published widely in the fields of macroeconomics and international economic development and currently teaches Macroeconomics, International Economics, and The World Economy.

Mini Biography

Prior to joining the School in 2008, Brian taught at Northumbria University where, before retiring, he was Professor of Economics and International Business. Brian has also worked for the Open University and was a Visiting Professor of Economics at Old Dominion University, Virginia, USA in 1990.

Research Groups

Business School

Research Interests

  • Macroeconomics
  • Economic growth
  • Global economic development
  • Globalisation and international trade

Publications

Authored book

Chapter in book

  • Snowdon, B. (2015). The Role of Human Capital in Economic Development. In Handbook of International Development and Education. Dixon, P., Humble, S. & Counihan, C.J. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar. 47-76.
  • Snowdon, B. (2011). The Wealth and Competitiveness of Nations: From Adam Smith to Michael Porter. In The Contributions of Michael Porter. Izushi, H. & Huggins, R. Oxford University Press.
  • Snowdon, B. (2010). New Classical Macroeconomics. In Twenty-first Century Economics. Free, R.C. Sage.

Edited book

  • Snowdon, B. & Vane, H.R. (2002). An Encyclopaedia of Macroeconomics. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Journal Article