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Research

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Professor Jonathan Long, BA Oxon, MA, PhD Nottingham

Professor [Research Leave 2013-14] in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures
Telephone: +44 (0) 191 33 43439

Contact Professor Jonathan Long (email at j.j.long@durham.ac.uk)

Biography

Since being appointed to Durham in 1997, I have worked extensively on twentieth-century German and Austrian literature, publishing on Thomas Bernhard, Wolfgang Hildesheimer, Monika Maron, Gerhard Fritsch, Hans Lebert,  Dieter Kühn, and others. Latterly, I have also worked extensively on photography and visual culture.

In 2005 I was awarded a £50,000 Philip Leverhulme Prize in recognition of international research achievement and the Max Kade Prize for Best Article in Modern Austrian Literature. I am currently a member of the editorial board of Modern Austrian Literature, and a founder member of the Durham Centre for Advanced Photography Studies. I am external examiner for undergraduate programmes in German at University College London. In October 2010, I took over the role of Deputy Head of Faculty (postgraduate) in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

My current research focuses on three main areas.

The first is the photographic book in the Weimar Republic. The profound social and political upheavals of Weimar are well-documented, as is the response to these upheavals in the cultural sphere. The photographic book, made possible in part by technical improvements in printing and image reproduction, was a significant cultural form by means of which Weimar photographers, artists, writers, and editors sought to address the problems facing Weimar society. While many producers of photographic books are canonical figures in Weimar cultural history (Moholy-Nagy, Kurt Tucholksy, Ernst Jünger, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Erich Mendelssohn, and August Sander, to name just a few), the genre has itself received little scholarly attention, but provides uniquely illuminating  insights into the culture and politics of inter-war Germany.

The second is German literature and photography from Peter Altenberg to the present. Looking at writers who have not merely thematised photography but have incorporated it physically into their work, the project seeks to read a series of works by writers such as Tucholsky, Jünger, Brecht, Kluge, and Maron as responses to the changing social function of photography over the course of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

The third is an ongoing engagement with W. G. Sebald and questions of modernity and photography in his work.

Conferences Organised

September 2009: Humanising Photography (with Andrea Nobel and Edward Welch). International Conference at Durham University.

June 2007: Locating Photography: Between the Regional, the National, and the Global (with Andrea Noble and Edward Welch). International Conference at Durham University.

July 2005: Thinking Photography - Again (with Andrea Noble and Edward Welch). International Conference at University of Durham.

March 2004: Photography and Conflict (with Andrea Noble and Edward Welch). Workshop at the University of Durham.

July 2002: Fakes and Forgeries, Conmen and Counterfeits (with Peter Knight, University of Manchester). Interdisciplinary conference at Durham Castle

Research Groups

School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Research Interests

  • Literary theory
  • Theory of photography and visual culture
  • Twentieth-century German literature
  • Writers and photography

Selected Publications

Books: authored

Books: edited

Books: sections

Edited works: contributions

Essays in edited volumes

Journal papers: academic

Translated: Chapter in Edited Book

Show all publications

Supervises

Selected Grants

  • 2006: AHRC Research Leave Award
  • 2006: British Academy Overseas Conference Grant
  • 2005: British Academy Conference Grant
  • 2005: Max Kade Prize for best article in Modern Austrian Studies
  • 2005: Philip Leverhulme Prize
  • 2000: British Academy Small Research Grant
  • 2000: ERASMUS Award for Guest Lectureship at University of Heidelberg
  • 2000: University of Durham Early Career Award
  • 1996: British Academy Award
  • 1996: DAAD 'Forschungskurzstipendium' for archival research at the Akademie der Künste, Berlin