Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Public Policy and Health

Previous Events

The health equity challenge: A review of progress to date

Friday 13th February 2015, 9am - 4.30pm, St. Mary’s College, Durham University 

It has now been seven years since the World Health Organization’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health released a landmark report organised around the concept of health equity. What has happened to the health equity agenda in the intervening years? On 13 February, the first of a series of mini-conferences and workshops on Revitalising the Health Equity Agenda will be held at St. Mary’s College, Durham University. Keynote speakers will be Jennie Popay, Professor of Sociology and Public Health, Lancaster University and Peter Goldblatt, Deputy Director of the Institute of Health Equity at University College London. The series is a project of the Special Interest Group on Health Equity in a Glocal World, Wolfson Research Institute for Health and Wellbeing, with funding from the Economic and Social Research Council. For further information please email healthequity.ESRC@durham.ac.uk; for the full programme click here.


Walker Welfare Reform Pilot Research Launch: The Impact of Public Policy on Poverty, Wellbeing and Health

Thursday 5th February 2015, 1pm - 4pm (refreshments from 12.30pm), Walker Activity Centre, Walker, Newcastle, NE6 3BR

This seminar will invite you to consider the findings of this important research that examines the impact of the "bedroom tax", on the wellbeing and health of people in Walker, where over 700 households have been affected. Eminent speakers such as Professor Ted Schrecker, Durham University, Cllr Joyce McCarty, Newcastle council, Amanda Hall, Your Homes Newcastle, Dr Suzanne Moffatt, Newcastle University and Professor Suzanne Fitzpatrick, Heriot-Watt University will consider the wider aspects of the impact of public policy on poverty, wellbeing and health, followed by discussion.

For further information email activeinclusion@newcastle.gov.uk or call 0191 2771733


Making Health & Wellbeing Board Strategies Work to Deliver Improved Health

Thursday 5th February 2015, 9.30am - 12.30pm, in F009, Wolfson Building, Durham University Queen's Campus, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 6BH

For further information click here.

 


Managing the public health spend: the value of health economics for priority setting

Tuesday 27th January 2015 – 12:30 – 16:00, Room 2.21 Research Beehive, Newcastle University

Aims and Objectives

In light of fundamental changes to public health structures in recent years, specifically the responsibility for public health transferring to local government at a time of increasing austerity, commissioners within local government face challenges for investment and disinvestment. In particular, there is increased pressure to ensure that resources are used so that return on investment, in terms of health benefits, is maximised. This brings a need to demonstrate transparency in decision-making in relation to local priorities for public health investment. These changes highlight the potential value of a health economics approach to priority setting in terms of making the most effective use of public health resources, and how best to apply the potential tools in context. 

This QRM will provide an overview of health economic principles which can be used to guide decision making. The programme will include a brief update on the changing public health landscape for commissioning. This will be followed by an introduction to economic approaches to managing scarcity and meeting need. An overview of health economic approaches to priority setting, and, in particular, the frameworks and tools that are readily available for use by local government to aid investment and disinvestment decisions will be presented. 

For further information please see the Fuse website.

Book Launch - Promoting Public Mental Health and Wellbeing by Jean Brown, Alyson Learmonth and Catherine Mackereth

Thursday 15th January 2015, 12noon - 2pm, in F009, Wolfson Building, Durham University Queen's Campus, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 6BH

What causes a person to flourish or languish? Or to be well or ill? How can mental health and well-being of society as a whole, and individuals, be promoted and enhanced? Click here for further details.


CPPH Guest Seminar: Multiple and Complex Causes:how set theoretic thinking and the use of Qualitative Comparative Analysis can help us deal with causation in complex systems by Professor David Byrne

Monday 8th December 2014, 12.30pm - 2.15pm, in F009, Wolfson Building, Durham University Queen's Campus, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 6BH

To download the PowerPoint Presentation by Professor David Byrne click here


 

CPPH Guest Lecture: Future Directions for the NHS by Simon Stevens, CEO, NHS England

Thursday 4th December, 12.30pm - 2pm, in D10, Ebsworth Building, Durham University Queen's Campus, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 6BH

Click here to see our news item about this event


CPPH Guest Lecture: Global health diplomacy - dream and reality by Richard Alderslade

Wednesday 5th November, 12.30pm - 2.15pm, in D009, Ebsworth Building, Queens Campus, Durham University, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 6BH

Health is improving globally, yet far from equally. The knowledge and technology exist to do better. Health diplomacy needs to raise its profile and capacity, and become more influential. That is the dream, yet what is the present reality? Can we be optimistic? The talk will explore these issues from the perspectives of both global health and global governance.

For further information Click Here


Lifestyle Drift and What to Do About it: Special Interest Group on Health Equity in a Glocal World

Monday 20th October 2014, 12.30pm-4.30pm, Turner Room at Van Mildert College, Durham University, Mill Hill Lane, Durham, DH1 3LH

This event will begin with a warm welcome by Linda McKie, Professor of Sociology and Head of the School of Applied Social Sciences, Durham University and Ted Schrecker, Professor of Global Health Policy, Durham University and include a range of speakers. For further information and to view supporting material Click here.


 

CPPH Guest Lecture: How Fit For Purpose Is The New English Public Health System? by Professor Eugene Milne

Monday 13th October 2014, 12.30pm - 2.15pm, in F009, Wolfson Building, Queens Campus, Durham University, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 6BH

Changes to the Public Health system were among the least controversial of those brought about by the Health and Social Care Act, and have been hailed in some quarters as ‘a once in a generation’ opportunity. However, the move of local public health responsibilities to Local Authorities has coincided with a time of austerity and redistribution that has put some of the most deprived areas under great pressure. Some structural aspects of the system remain unresolved, and the establishment of Public Health England has created a larger, Civil Service based, corpus of PH capacity. This may have blunted rather than sharpened the scope for collective action on key issues. This lecture will consider the experience of the new system in its first 18 months and its implications for the delivery of health improvement and reduction of inequalities.

For further information click here  or to view his presentation slides click here.


Making better decisions on public health spending: Getting to grips with value for money

Thursday 18th September 2014, 9am - 5pm, The King's Fund, London W1G 0AN

This one-day conference, run in partnership with the Local Government Association, will help public health professionals and health and wellbeing boards make better decisions on public health. Professor David Hunter from the Centre of Public Policy and Health, Durham Univeristy will be speaking at this. For further information please click here.


North East Global Health Network

Thursday 5th June, 10am – 4pm at St. Mary’s College, Durham – Kenworth Room

A workshop to bring together researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and others based in North-East England working on any aspect of global health. For further information and to register click here or contact Kate Hampshire


Governance approaches in the forming of European health strategies: European Commission (EC) ‘Together for Health’ and World Health Organisation (WHO) Regional Office for Europe ‘Health 2020’ by Paula Franklin

Monday 2nd June 2014, F009, Wolfson Building, Queens Campus, Durham University, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 6BH

Governance approaches in the forming of European health strategies: European Commission ‘Together for Health’ and WHO ‘Health 2020’

Europe currently has two major public health strategies in circulation: the European Commission’s ‘Together for Health’, and the World Health Organisation Europe’s ‘Health 2020’ with the accompanying ‘European Action Plan’ (EAP) as its main implementation pillar. Both strategies cover a range of “wicked issues” such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and (unhealthy) food products, thereby having a direct impact on the everyday lives of citizens. Health involves everyone, but who has a say in determining how and which interests are prioritised? 

The Directorate General for Health and Consumers (DG SANCO), responsible for the drafting of the EC Strategy, inhabits the elusive “Brussels bubble”, and is a target of heavy lobbying from a variety of stakeholders including NGOs, industry, EU Member States. Governing the process of forming such multi-stakeholder policy poses challenges to openness (transparency of proceedings, availability of information), participation (who has the opportunity to participate and how), and accountability (decision-making processes, representativeness).

Paula Franklin is an International Junior Research Fellow (COFUND) at the Wolfson Research Institute for Health and Wellbeing, attached to the Centre for Public Policy and Health (CPPH). She is currently conducting a two-year ethnographic study into governance of two European health strategies (EC and WHO). Prior to joining the Institute and CPPH, she worked as a Research Associate at the European Health Management Association (EHMA) in Brussels, researching and writing patient safety guidelines for European hospitals, and taught MSc students in International Public Health at University of Liverpool Laureate Online Programme. She obtained her PhD in Sociology from University of Surrey Roehampton in 2006, after which she worked as a research assistant at University of London, Royal Holloway, as a member of a team that conducted a three-year qualitative study into leadership and management approaches and their relationship to patient care within the NHS. Paula is originally from Finland; she completed her Master’s degree in Adult Education at the University of Helsinki.

To view the presentation slides for this lecture please click here.


 

Launch Event – Organising Care Special Interest Group

Thursday 29th May 2014, Room 452, Durham University Business School, Mill Hill Lane, Durham DH1 3LB

To register or for further information please click here.


Guest Lecture - Evidence based policy: The development and implementation of national policy trials in Wales by Professor Simon Murphy

Tuesday 29th April 2014, F009, Wolfson Building, Queens Campus, Durham University, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 6BH

There are significant practical and methodological barriers to the conduct of policy trials in the UK. Drawing on case studies of a number of successful national policy trials conducted in Wales, this talk will:

  • explore theoretical and methodological approaches to their development and facilitation
  • highlight appropriate evaluation frameworks and methodology for rigorous realist trials with high external validity
  • and explore their impact on subsequent policy and practice

Conclusions will focus on the utility of Transdisciplinary action research approaches adopted within the Public Health Improvement Research Network in Wales, the appropriateness of the MRC framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions, the role of mixed methods in policy trials and challenges in developing evidence based policy. Please see below images of the lecture.

Simon Murphy Lecture


Ambiguous Capture: Collaboratory capitalism in global vaccine initiatives by Dr Janice Graham

18th March 2014, 12:30 to 14:30, Tees Suite, Wolfson Research Institute, Dr Janice Graham
 
Professor Ted Schrecker is delighted to welcome Dr Graham to deliver an Optimising Population Health themed lecture entitled Ambiguous Capture: Collaboratory capitalism in global vaccine initiatives.
 
Abstract

Vaccines save human lives; they cure before there is disease; they care preventatively, invisibly and effectively. Expanded vaccination coverage is among the major achievements of public health, embodying a caring society, a state where ensuring future life as such matters. Wrapped in ethics and economics, in languages and understandings steeped in location, migrations, hegemonies of class, religion, gender, in the epidemiology, technology and science of assays, surveillance and serums, vaccines are often sold as single fix success narratives to national and international public health consortia.

For further information or to register please click here.


 

Health Rights in (against?) the Global Marketplace by Professor Ted Schrecker

Thursday, 13th March 2014, 09:00 – 10:00 am, Durham; South End House SE016 (ground floor)

Over the past few decades, reorganisation of production and finance across multiple national borders has been accompanied, and often driven, by restructuring of social relationships around the primacy of the market. The consequences have been described by the editor of Le Monde Diplomatique as an ‘inequality machine [that] is reshaping the planet’. That reshaping redistributes opportunities to lead a healthy life (the social determinants of health), and at the same time affects the prospects of political coalitions in support of reducing health disparities. Against this background, the human rights frame of reference is especially valuable as a direct challenge to neoliberal orthodoxy, grounded in the generic commitment to what historical sociologist Margaret Somers has called ‘the right to have rights’ independent of the market.


Inaugural Lecture: Rediscovering Virchow, revisiting Brecht: Health politics for a new Gilded Age

Friday 7th March 2014, Holliday Building, Queens Campus, Durham University, Professor Ted Schrecker

Rediscovering Virchow, revisiting Brecht: Health politics for a new Gilded Age

The editor of Le Monde Diplomatique recently wrote that “[t]he inequality machine is reshaping the whole planet.” This is the background against which prospects for reducing health disparities through public policy must be assessed; it presents formidable challenges, not least because in many contexts state policies are either accelerating the inequality machine or magnifying its effects. WHO’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health directed attention to the moral imperative of overcoming those challenges, but doing so will require re-engaging with older, explicitly political understandings of public health and social policy.

A drinks reception will follow the lecture.

The lecture will begin at 5.15 pm prompt.

To view the video recording of this presentation click here.


The politics of health in England - "a National Health Service would be a good idea" by Professor Alex Scott-Samuel

Wednesday 26th February 2014, F009, Wolfson Building, Durham University, Queens Campus

The politics of health in England - "a National Health Service would be a good idea"

Professor Alex Scott-Samuel's title reflects Gandhi's comment when asked what he thought of Western civilisation: "I think it would be a good idea". Following the Health and Social Care Act 2012 we no longer have a national health service in England; Alex will discuss how this has come about and how a future government could deal with the present situation. Alex will set his discussion in the context of my view that health sciences are substantially disadvantaged by the absence of a discipline of health politics.

To view Professor Alex Scott-Samuel's presentation click here.


Durham CELLS seminar: 'A tale of two controversies: Standards of proof in health policy'

29th January 2014, 16:00 to 17:00, Pennington Room, Professor Ted Schrecker

This Durham CELLS seminar will be given by Ted Schrecker who is Professor of Global Health Policy, Durham University. Professor Schrecker is also an adjunct professor of Epidemiology and Community Medicine at the University of Ottawa. 

For further information click here


Book Launch - Partnership Working in Public Health by Professor David Hunter and Neil Perkins

Tuesday 28 January 2014, F009, Wolfson Building, Durham University, Queens Campus

The UK government’s reforms of the NHS and public health system require partnerships if they are to succeed. Those partnerships concerned with public health are especially important and are deemed to be a ’good thing’ which add, rather than consume, value. Yet the significant emphasis on partnership working to secure effective policy and service delivery exists despite the evidence testifying to how difficult it is to make partnerships work or achieve results.

For further information click here or to register your attendance click here.


Who influences policy and why? Understanding strategies to control the policy process by Kathryn Oliver

29th October 2013, F009, Wolfson Building, Durham University, Queens Campus

Kathryn Oliver will present the findings from a study of public health policy makers and evidence producers and how they went about influencing policy. The study sought to understand how policy is influenced and what strategies are employed by those involved in the policy process. These were then compared with knowledge brokerage frameworks. Knowledge brokerage is promoted as a way for researchers to influence policy and practice. It can be approached analytically as a collection of activities or strategies used by individuals to influence policy. The study found that although knowledge brokerage activities were used, influential individuals were often more important than the content of the message. While policy is influenced by a range of knowledge brokerage activities, characteristics of the ‘messenger’ were more important than the ‘message’. This paper presents a novel approach to, and sheds new light on, understanding the importance of knowledge brokerage activities and their influence on policy. It suggests researchers are unlikely to influence policy using traditional knowledge brokerage activities.  

To download Kathryn Oliver's presentation click here


North Yorkshire Wider Partnerships Conference

This year's conference was held on Friday 22 November 2013 with a theme of 'Public health in North Yorkshire - Creating a whole-county approach to reducing health inequalities'. The conference featured presentations from:

  • Dr. Lincoln Sargeant (Director of Public Health for North Yorkshire)
  • Dr. Stephen Morton (Centre Director, Yorkshire and the Humber, for Public Health England)
  • Professor David Hunter (Health Policy and Management, Durham University)

Consultation on refresh of North Yorkshire Community Plan

Local Government North Yorkshire and York and the Chief Executives Group for North Yorkshire and York are currently leading a piece of work to refresh the North Yorkshire Community Plan 2011/14.

The purpose of the plan is to set out the key issues and actions that need to be tackled in partnership across North Yorkshire. We need to review the current plan to make sure that our vision, objectives and action plan are the right ones to help make sure that the county is well placed to respond to both the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead of us in the next few years. To this end, we have produced a draft refreshed version of the North Yorkshire Community Plan 2014/17 on which we would now be grateful for partners' comments.