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Durham University

Postgraduate Module Handbook 2021/2022

Archive Module Description

This page is for the academic year 2021-22. The current handbook year is 2022-23

Department: Theology and Religion

THEO53230: Advanced Hebrew Texts

Type Open Level 4 Credits 30 Availability Available in 2021/22

Prerequisites

  • Hebrew at advanced undergraduate level

Corequisites

  • None

Excluded Combination of Modules

  • None

Aims

  • This module is designed to develop and increase the technical skills required for independent research on the Old Testament and early Jewish texts at an advanced level. Special attention is directed towards equipping candidates with the linguistic expertise, knowledge of textual and literary criticism, and insight into exegetical issues necessary for in-depth analysis of ancient Hebrew literature. Candidates will have the opportunity to study post-biblical works in the original Hebrew (including texts from the Dead Sea caves and Rabbinic writings) along with Old Testament texts.

Content

  • Texts offered for study in this module are chosen with an eye to encouraging the student to work independently, and to bring to the regular seminars such insights as he or she may have gathered in the course of private study. The seminars also give opportunities for full discussion of problems in the text, whether literary, textual, or exegetical. Where the student feels that help is required with the translation of particularly difficult passages, such help is available either in seminars or in one-to-one tutorials specially arranged for the purpose. The teaching of this module is therefore flexible, and can often be tailored to suit the needs of individual students and their interests. For example, those with an interest in archaeology might elect to study in detail a Hebrew text offering scope for exegesis in the light of archaeological research. Enthusiasm for the Hebrew language, and a desire to acquire deeper knowledge of it, is an important pre-requisite. Students are encouraged to consult further with the module co-ordinator about specific texts for study.

Learning Outcomes

Subject-specific Knowledge:
  • to translate accurately and independently Hebrew texts whose language, grammar, and syntax involves a high degree of complexity and difficulty
  • to give an accurate, scientific account of the Hebrew language in the texts studied
Subject-specific Skills:
  • to offer solutions to linguistic and exegetical problems encountered in the texts studied, and the basis of independent research
  • to engage critically with modern scholarly treatments of the texts studied
Key Skills:
  • students will acquire the ability to offer independent assessments of the texts studied, and the scholarly treatments of them
  • they will be able to demonstrate familarity with other writings which may assist in the explication of the texts they have studied.

Modes of Teaching, Learning and Assessment and how these contribute to the learning outcomes of the module

  • Texts offered for study in this module are chosen with an eye to encouraging the student to work independently, and to bring to the regular seminars such insights as he or she may have gathered in the course of private study. The seminars also give opportunities for full discussion of problems in the text, whether literary, textual, or exegetical. Where the student feels that help is required with the translation of particularly difficult passages, such help is available either in seminars or in one-to-one tutorials specially arranged for the purpose. The teaching of this module is therefore flexible, and can often be tailored to suit the needs of individual students and their interests. For example, those with an interest in archaeology might elect to study in detail a Hebrew text offering scope for exegesis in the light of archaeological research

Teaching Methods and Learning Hours

Activity Number Frequency Duration Total/Hours
Seminars 20 weekly 1 hour 20
Preparation and Reading 280
Total 300

Summative Assessment

Component: Essay Component Weighting: 100%
Element Length / duration Element Weighting Resit Opportunity
Essay 5000 words 100%

Formative Assessment:

Exegetical essay, 5000 words.


Attendance at all activities marked with this symbol will be monitored. Students who fail to attend these activities, or to complete the summative or formative assessment specified above, will be subject to the procedures defined in the University's General Regulation V, and may be required to leave the University