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Prof Richard Hingley, BA; PhD

Professor in the Department of Archaeology

(email at richard.hingley@durham.ac.uk)

Media Contacts

Available for media contact about:

  • Classics and Ancient History: Hadrians' Wall
  • Classics: Hadrians' Wall
  • Latin: Hadrians' Wall
  • Classics and Ancient History: Boudica
  • Ancient literature: Boudica
  • Classics: Boudica
  • Latin: Boudica
  • Classics and Ancient History: Roman Britain
  • Ancient literature: Roman Britain
  • Classics: Roman Britain
  • Roman history: Roman Britain
  • Classics and Ancient History: Roman Northern Britain (northern England, Scotland)
  • Ancient literature: Roman Northern Britain (northern England, Scotland)
  • Classics: Roman Northern Britain (northern England, Scotland)
  • Roman history: Roman Northern Britain (northern England, Scotland)
  • Classics and Ancient History: Roman villas
  • Ancient literature: Roman villas
  • Roman history: Roman villas
  • History & Archaeology: Iron Age Britain
  • European Prehistory: Iron Age Britain

Biography

My current research focuses on transforming knowledge of Rome, addressing several distinct topics, including:

  1. 'Geographies of Roman heritage' . Through my work on Roman frontiers and places, I am working across the divide that separates academic scholarship from heritage practice.
  2. The genealogy of the changing meanings of ‘empire’ from the classical Roman past to the present day’. This focuses on the inheritance and transformation of classical knowledge, with a particular locus in the Western Roman empire and the contemporary ‘West’.
  3. Roman identity and social change’. Working beyond the ongoing critique of Romanization theory to develop new approaches to Roman identity and its transformation.
  4. The reception of knowledge of Rome in the Western Roman empire’. Exploring the sequence of the antiquarian and archaeological understanding of past societies from the sixteenth century to the present.
  5. Colonial archaeologies from the eighteenth century to today’. Exploring how archaeology served colonial practices and the political context of the so-called ‘post-colonial archaeologies’ of today.
  6. Ancestral histories’. Addressing how later prehistoric and Roman-period societies articulated ideas about material items that were derived from their ancient pasts.

A number of recent and current projects articulate with these themes:

  • Hadrian’s Wall: A life’ (2012). This book arose out of the major cross-disciplinary research project ‘Tales of the Frontier’, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council from 2007 to 2011. It provides a significant study of the reception of the Wall from the second to the twenty first century .
  • Bringing the Roman Frontier to life. I am now working to develop the approach outlined in this recent book and to explore extending this to the Frontiers of the Roman Empire across Europe, North Africa and the Near East. One issue of importance is how to embed this new approach into heritage practice. My membership of the Hadrian's Wall World Heritage Management Plan Committee gives me a role in the debate in the UK., but I will seek to develop new contacts to explore the potential for a broader geographical focus during 2013-2016.
  • Life of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire’. I directed an initiative that ran in Durham for 2011-2012 with funding from the Institute of Advanced Studies. This focused attention on the cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural nature of frontiers.
  • Empire and colony’. My 2005 book, Globalizing Roman culture, addressed the relationship between contemporary Empire and the Roman empire through a case study of the Western Roman empire and the context of contemporary scholarship. I am currently exploring this topic in greater depth and am working on a book that addresses the genealogy of empire.
  • Binchester Roman Fort’. Durham and Stanford (California) are in the fourth year of a major excavation project on the Roman fort at Binchester. I have a role in the running and development of this significant initiative which is exploring the fort, vicus and landscape around this Roman site. I hope to use this project to help address the character of the relationship between indigenous peoples and incomers on this section of the Roman frontier.

 

Research Interests

  • Empire
  • Heritage management - theoretical and practical aspect
  • History of the development of Roman archaeology
  • Post colonial theory and colonial archaeology
  • Roman imperialism and provincial archaeology in the Western Roman
  • Sustainabilty and historic landscapes

Publications

Books: authored

  • Hingley, Richard (2012). Hadrian's Wall: A Life. Oxford Oxford University Press.
  • Hingley, Richard (2010). O Imperialismo Romano: Novas Perspectivas a Partir da Bretanha. Sao Paulo: Anna Bulme.
  • Hingley, Richard. (2008). The Recovery of Roman Britain 1586 to 1906: A Colony so Fertile. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Hingley, R. & Unwin, C. (2005). Boudica: Iron Age Warrior Queen. London: Hambledon and London.
  • Hingley, R. (2005). Globalizing Roman Culture: Unity, Diversity and Empire. London: Routledge.
  • Hingley, R. (2005). Settlement and Sacrifice: The later prehistoric people of Scotland. Edinburgh: Berlin.
  • Hingley R (2000). Roman officers and English gentlemen. London: Routledge.
  • Hingley, Richard (1989). Rural Settlement in Roman Britain. Seaby.

Books: edited

  • Fleming, A. & Hingley, R. (2007). Prehistoric and Roman Landscapes: Landscape History after Hoskins. Macclesfield: Windgather Press.
  • Hingley, R. & Willis, S. (2007). Roman Finds: Context and Theory. Oxford: Oxbow.
  • Hingley, R (2001). Images of Rome: Perceptions of ancient Rome in Europe and the United States of America in the modern age. Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series. Portsmouth, R.I..

Books: sections

  • Hingley, Richard (2014). Romanization. In Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology. Smith, Claire Springer. 6373-6380.
  • Hingley, R. (2013). The Living Frontier: The Passing of Time on Hadrian's Wall. In Presenting the Romans: Interpreting the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site. Mills, N. Boydell & Brewer. 147-156.
  • Hingley, Richard (2012). "A place that the lover of antiquity will visit with great delight": from Caer Segonte to Calleva Atrebatum. In Silchester and the study of Romano-British Urbanism. Fulford, Michael Journal of Roman Archaeology. Supplementary Series 90: 23-40.
  • Hingley, Richard (2012). Comment: processing the past. In Matters of Scale: Processes and courses of events in the past and the present. Burström, Nanouschka M. & Fahlander, Fredrik PAG. Stockholm Studies in Archaeology 56, 2012: 185-196.
  • Hingley, Richard (2012). Commentary: inheriting Roman Places. In Making Roman Places, past and present. Totten, Darian Marie & Lafrenz Samules, Kathryn Journal of Roman Archaeology. Supplementary Series No. 89: 171-176.
  • Hingley, Richard (2012). Explotation and Assimilation: The Western Roman Empire from Augustus to Trajan. In A Companion to Roman Imperialism. Hoyos, Dexter Brill. History of Warfare, Volum 81: 265-276.
  • Hingley, Richard (2011). Iron Age Knowledge: Pre-Roman Peoples and Myths of Origin. In Atlantic Europe in the First Millennium BC: crossing the divide. Moore, T. & Armada, X-L. Oxford University Press. 617-637.
  • Hingley, Richard (2011). Rome: Imperial and Local Religions. In The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Ritual and Religion. Insoll, Timothy Oxford Oxford University Press. 745-757.
  • Rogers, Adam. & Hingley, Richard. (2010). Edward Gibbon and Francis Haverfield: The Traditions of Imperial Decline. In Classics & Imperialism in the British Empire. Bradley, Mark. Oxford.: Oxford University Press. 189-209.
  • Hingley, Richard. (2010). Tales of the Frontier: diasporas on Hadrian's wall. In Roman Diasporas: Archaeological Approaches to Mobility and Diversity in the Roman Empire. Eckardt, Hella. Portsmouth, Rhode Island, USA: Journal of Roman Archaeology. 227-243.
  • Hingley, Richard. (2009). Cultural Diversity and Unity: Empire and Rome. In Material Culture and Social Identities in the Ancient World. Hales, Shelly. & Hodos, Tamar. Cambridge.: Cambridge University Press. 54-75.
  • Hingely, Richard (2009). Foreword. In Pegswood Moor, Morpeth: A later Iron Age and Romano-British Farmstead Settlement. Proctor, Jennifer Pre-Construct Archaeology. vii.
  • Hingley, Richard. (2008). Hadrian's Wall in Theory: Pursuing new agendas. In Understanding Hadrian's Wall papers from a conference held at South Shields, 3rd-5th November, 2006, to mark the publication of the 14th edition of the Handbook of the Roman Wall. Bidwell, Paul. Kendal: Arbeia Society. 25-28.
  • Hingley, Richard. (2008). Romans and Natives in Britain. In Rome and the Barbarians: The birth of a new world. Torino: Skira. 112-115.
  • Hingley, Richard (2007). Francis John Haverfield (1860-1919): Oxford, Roman archaeology and Edwardian imperialism. In Oxford Classics: Teaching and Learning, 1800-2000. Stray, C. London: Duckworth.
  • Willis, S. & Hingley, R. (2007). Roman Finds: Context and Theory. In Roman Finds: Context and Theory. Hingley, R. & Willis, S. Oxford: Oxbow. 2-17.
  • Hingley, R. (2007). The Currency Bars. In Stanway: An Elite Burial site at Camulodunum. Crummy, P., Benfield, S., Crummy, N., Rigby, V. & Shimmin, D. London: Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies. 33-6.
  • Hingley, R. (2007). The Roman Landscape of Britain: From Hoskins to today. In Prehistoric and Roman Landscapes: Landscape History after Hoskins. Fleming, A. & Hingley, R. Maclesfield: Windgather. 101-113.
  • Hingley, R. (2006). Defining Community: iron, boundaries and transformation in later prehistoric Britain. In Enclosing the Past. Harding, A., Sievers, S. & Venclova, N. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Monographs. 116-25.
  • Haselgrove, C. & Hingley, R. (2006). Iron Deposition and its significance in pre-Roman Britain. In Les depots metalliques au second age du Fer en Europe temperee. Bataille, Gerard & Guillaumet, Jean-Paul Bibracte: Centre archeologique europeen.
  • Hingley, R. (2005). Iron Age 'currency bars' in Britain: items of exchange in liminal contexts? In Iron Age Coinage and Ritual Practice. Haselgrove, C. & Wigg-Wolf, D. Mainz am Rhein: Phillipp von Zaberg. Studien zu Fundmunzen der Antike.
  • R. Hingley (2005). Settlement in Britannia. In Unidad y diversidad en el Arco Atlantico en epoca romana. Fernandez Ochoa, C. & Garcia Diaz, P. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports. International 1371: 267-78.
  • Hingley, R. (2004). Rural Settlement in Northern Britain. In A Companion to Roman Britain. Todd, M. Oxford: Blackwell. 327-48.
  • Higley, R. & Ingram, H.A.P. (2002). History as an aid to understanding peat bogs. In Understanding the Historic Environment in its Environmental Setting. Smout, T. C. Scottish Cultural Press. 60-87.
  • Hingley, R., & Miles, D. (2002). The human impact on the landscape: agriculture, settlement, industry, infrastructure. In Short Oxford History of the British Isles: The Rome Era. Salway, P. Oxford University Press. 141-72.
  • Hingley, R. (2001). An Imperial Legacy: the contribution of Classical Rome to the Character of the English. In Images of Rome: perceptions of Ancient Rome in Europe and the United States in the modern age. Hingley, R. Portsmouth, R.I.: Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series. 145-66.
  • Hingley, R. (2001). Images of Rome. In Images of Rome: Perceptions of ancient Rome in Europe and the United States in the modern age. Hingley, R. Portsmouth, R. I.: Journal of Roman Archaeology. Supplementary Series No. 44: 7-22.
  • Hingley R (1997). Resistance and domination: social change in Roman Britain. In Dialogues in Roman Imperialism. Mattingly, D. Journal of Roman Archaeology.

Journal papers: academic

  • Hingley, R., Witcher, R.E. & Nesbitt, C. (2012). Life of an Ancient Monument: Hadrian's Wall in History. Antiquity 86(333): 760-771.
  • Hingley, Richard. & Hartis, Rich. (2011). Contextualizing Hadrian's Wall: The Wall as 'Debatable Lands'. Frontiers in the Roman World 13: 79-96.
  • Hingley, Richard (2011). Globalization and the Roman Empire: The Geneaology of Empire. Semata: Ciencias Sociais e Humanidades 23: 99-113.
  • Hingley, Richard (2011). Living Landscape: reading Hadrian's Wall. Landscapes 12(2): 41-62.
  • Hingley, Richard. (2010). ‘The most ancient Boundary between England and Scotland’ Genealogies of the Roman Wall(s). Classical Reception Journal 2(1): 25-43.
  • Witcher, R.E., Tolia-Kelly, D.P. & Hingley, R. (2010). Archaeologies of Landscape. Excavating the Materialities of Hadrian's Wall. Journal of Material Culture 15(1): 105-128.
  • Hingley, Richard (2010). Stonehenge. The Public Historian 32: 143-6.
  • Hingley, Richard. (2009). Esoteric Knowledge: ancient bronze artefacts from Iron Age contexts. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 75: 143-166.
  • Hingley, Richard. & Nesbitt, Claire. (2008). A Wall for all times. British Archaeology September/October 2008: 44-49.
  • Hingley, Richard. (2008). Not so Romanized? Tradition, reinvention or discovery in the study of Roman Britain. World Archaeology 40(3): 427-443.
  • R. Hingley (2007). The Society, its Council, the membership and publications from 1820 to 1850. Archaeologia 111: 173-197.
  • Hingley, R (2006). Projecting empire: the mapping of Roman Britain. Journal of Social Archaeology 6(3): 328-353.
  • Hingley, R. (2006). The deposition of iron objects in Britain during the later prehistoric and Roman periods: contextual analysis and the significance of iron. Britannia 37(1): 213-257.
  • Hingley, R. (2005). Concepcoes de Roma: uma perspective inglesa. Textos Didaticos 47(2nd edition): 27-63.
  • Hingley R, H.L. Moore, J.E. Triscott & G. Wilson (1997). The excavation of two later Iron Age fortified homesteads at Aldclune, Blair Atholl, Perth and Kinross. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. 127 407-466
  • Hingley R (1996). Ancestors and identity in the later prehistory of Atlantic Scotland: the reuse and reinvention of Neolithic monuments and material culture. World Archaeology. 28 231-243

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