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Durham University

Durham University News

Comment and opinion

Headaches: three tips from a neuroscientist on how to get rid of them

Professor Amanda Ellison from our Department of Psychology provides helpful tips on how to get rid of headaches.

(10 Jun 2021) » More about Headaches: three tips from a neuroscientist on how to get rid of them


Nigeria: a deleted tweet, a Twitter ban and Biafran wounds that have never healed

In this article, Dr Benjamin Maiangwa from our School of Government and International Affairs and PhD candidate Oluchi Gloria Ogbu from the University of Manitoba discuss the Nigerian-Biafran war. 

(10 Jun 2021) » More about Nigeria: a deleted tweet, a Twitter ban and Biafran wounds that have never healed


COVID school recovery: is England's £1.4 billion catch-up plan a good idea?

In this article, Professor Stephen Gorard, from our School of Education, examines the proposed measures of the UK government's COVID recovery plan for schools and how it may have mixed success.

(3 Jun 2021) » More about COVID school recovery: is England's £1.4 billion catch-up plan a good idea?


Endurance got us through multiple lockdowns, and it'll help us coming out of the pandemic too

In this article, Dr Felix Ringel, from our Department of Anthropology, comments on how the creative responses whilst adapting during the pandemic could be carried over into a post-pandemic future.

(1 Jun 2021) » More about Endurance got us through multiple lockdowns, and it'll help us coming out of the pandemic too


BBC Diana 'cover up' – why Lord Dyson's report is a body blow for broadcaster

In this article, Professor Tim Luckhurst, Principal of South College examines the BBC's recent acceptance of the Dyson Report and what it means for the broadcaster. 

(21 May 2021) » More about BBC Diana 'cover up' – why Lord Dyson's report is a body blow for broadcaster


Can women curate their social media feed to protect mental health?

Woman on mobile phone

Hester Hockin-Boyers (PhD student in Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences & Department of Sociology), Dr. Stacey Pope (Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences) and Dr. Kimberly Jamie from our Department of Sociology discuss the impact of social media on women’s mental health.

(20 May 2021) » More about Can women curate their social media feed to protect mental health?


Covid, creativity, and caprice: finding a new way in the new normal

Professor Richard Scholar, recently appointed Chair in French in MLAC, explains how he has found a creative solution to Covid constraints and has invented, with the help of filmmaker Alan Fentiman, a new way of reaching wider audiences for work in the arts and humanities.

(19 May 2021) » More about Covid, creativity, and caprice: finding a new way in the new normal


Dead Sea Scrolls: two scribes probably wrote one of the manuscripts

Rev Dr Pete Phillips from our Department of Theology and Religion discusses new research on the Dead Sea Scrolls that proposes two scribes with very similar handwriting probably wrote the two halves of one of the manuscripts.

(22 Apr 2021) » More about Dead Sea Scrolls: two scribes probably wrote one of the manuscripts


Ten ways universities can tackle harassment and sexual misconduct

Professor Graham Towl, our Associate Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Colleges and Student Experience) and a professor of forensic psychology who formerly chaired our Sexual Violence Task Force, and Clarissa Humphreys, Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Response Manager, identify ten ways that universities can go above and beyond OfS' new standards on harassment and sexual misconduct.

(22 Apr 2021) » More about Ten ways universities can tackle harassment and sexual misconduct


What does Britain's new Cyber Force mean for the future of cyber security?

laptop

Dr Andrew Dwyer from our Department of Geography, and Dr Joe Devanny – deputy director of the Centre for Defence Studies in the Department of War Studies (King’s College London) – discuss how the success of the new UK National Cyber Force (NCF) will be determined by the quality of the leadership, strategy, structures and processes that shape its growth and operational use.

(22 Apr 2021) » More about What does Britain's new Cyber Force mean for the future of cyber security?


Prehistoric cave painters might have been ‘high’ on oxygen deprivation – new study

Professor Paul Pettitt from our Department of Archaeology explains why a new hypothesis that focuses on low oxygen levels fails to explain the majority of cave art.

(20 Apr 2021) » More about Prehistoric cave painters might have been ‘high’ on oxygen deprivation – new study


Can bad weather really cause headaches?

In this article, Professor Amanda Ellison explores the connection between headaches and the weather, and explains how to reduce the impact that headaches have on our daily lives. 

(19 Apr 2021) » More about Can bad weather really cause headaches?


Reflections on mass testing as the UK moves out of lockdown

Professor Jacqui Ramagge, our Executive Dean for Science, and Associate Professor Camila Caiado, from our Mathematical Sciences Department, who have led our Lateral Flow Testing programme, reflect on mass testing as the UK moves out of Covid-19 lockdown.

(17 Apr 2021) » More about Moving out of lockdown


Should cyberwar be met with physical force? Moral philosophy can help us decide

Professor Christoper Finlay from our School of Government and International Affairs explores the ethical considerations that should take place before we decide upon appropriate responses to cyber-attacks.

(9 Apr 2021) » More about Should cyberwar be met with physical force? Moral philosophy can help us decide


When Neville Chamberlain tried to ‘no-platform’ the Yorkshire Post

Principal of South College Tim Luckhurst explores how the Yorkshire Post refused to toe the line by condemning Neville Chamberlain's foreign policy in the lead up to the Second World War. 

(9 Apr 2021) » More about When Neville Chamberlain tried to ‘no-platform’ the Yorkshire Post


How men can be allies to women right now

In this article, Dr Stephen Burrell, Professor Nicole Westmarland and Honorary Fellow Sandy Ruxton all from our Department of Sociology, explain how all men have a responsibility to play part in helping to end violence against women.

(17 Mar 2021) » More about How men can be allies to women right now


Sarah Everard: why women shouldn’t have to risk trading their freedom for safety

Dr Hannah Bows from our Law School explains how penalising and physically handling women at a vigil didn’t just ignore some women’s fears of authorities, it suggested that women shouldn’t be speaking out at all.

(17 Mar 2021) » More about Sarah Everard: why women shouldn’t have to risk trading their freedom for safety


Playing with ultra-thin dolls could make girls as young as five want skinnier bodies

Professor Lynda Boothroyd talks about how ultra-thin dolls, one of the most popular toys of all time, pose a potential risk to young girls’ developing body ideals. 

(11 Mar 2021) » More about Playing with ultra-thin dolls could make girls as young as five want skinnier bodies


New book reveals what drives election rigging – and when citizens resist it

In this article, Professor Justin Willis from our Department of History, Professor Nic Cheeseman from the University of Birmingham and Professor Gabrielle Lynch from the University of Warwick discuss their new book “The Moral Economy of Elections in Africa”.

(10 Mar 2021) » More about New book reveals what drives election rigging – and when citizens resist it


Memory practices are not enough to remedy Nigeria-Biafra war injustices

In this article, Dr Benjamin Maiangwa from our School of Government and International Affairs and Dr Chigbo Arthur Anyaduba from the University of Winnipeg discuss why commemoration rituals are superficial tools to deal with the injustices of the Nigerian-Biafran war. 

(9 Mar 2021) » More about Memory practices are not enough to remedy Nigeria-Biafra war injustices


History of divisive ethnic identities shows it's time Nigeria admits its role in enforcing them

Dr Benjamin Maiangwa from our School of Government and International Affairs, and Muhammad Dan Suleiman from the University of Western Australia discuss adversarial identity formation in Nigeria.

(3 Mar 2021) » More about History of divisive ethnic identities shows it's time Nigeria admits its role in enforcing them


Everton’s new Bramley-Moore stadium is a stark reminder of Liverpool’s historic entanglement with slavery in Brazil

Despite opposition from heritage groups, Everton Football Club’s planned move to a new £500-million stadium at Bramley-Moore Dock has been given the green light by planning officials. The Grade-II listed site is rightly regarded as an important example of Liverpool’s rich maritime heritage, but its name also carries a stark reminder of the city’s historic entanglement with slavery in Brazil, which continued long after abolition in Britain’s own colonies, writes Joe Mulhern, who is part of our International Office and an Honorary Fellow of our Department of History.

(2 Mar 2021) » More about Everton’s new Bramley-Moore stadium is a stark reminder of Liverpool’s historic entanglement with slavery in Brazil


How border walls threaten species trying to escape rising temperatures

A jaguar lying on a rock

Mark Titley and Professor Stephen Willis from our Department of Biosciences discuss how wildlife could be prevented from escaping intolerable temperatures by walls and fences that cover the world’s political borders.

(23 Feb 2021) » More about How border walls threaten species trying to escape rising temperatures


Why we're obsessed with music from our youth

In this article, Dr Kelly Jakubowski from our Department of Music explores how music is closely linked with memory and emotion.

(12 Feb 2021) » More about Why we're obsessed with music from our youth


Banning safe home-use abortion pills will leave more women in crisis

Dr Emma Milne from Durham Law School says banning home-use abortion pills will prevent women from easily accessing safe and compassionate abortion care at home.

(10 Feb 2021) » More about Banning safe home-use abortion pills will leave more women in crisis


Reindeer: ancient migration routes disrupted by roads, dams – and now wind farms

In this article, Ilona Kater and Dr Robert Baxter from our Department of Biosciences, and Professor Simone Abram from our Department of Anthropology comment on how roads, railways, mines, dams and now wind turbines are preventing reindeer from following their traditional migrations.

(9 Feb 2021) » More about Reindeer: ancient migration routes disrupted by roads, dams – and now wind farms


Why your kids know when you're trying to put on a brave face

In this article, Dr Paddy Ross from our Department of Psychology, explains that according to new research he carried out with his team, children prioritise sound over sight when identifying emotions.

(8 Feb 2021) » More about Why your kids know when you're trying to put on a brave face


Disappearing glaciers are threatening rare alpine plants with extinction

In this article, Dr Robert Baxter from our Department of Biosciences comments on how many unique alpine plants thrive in new areas of bare ground in front of retreating glaciers. He explains that with continued warming threatening the extinction of some glaciers, the rare alpine plants are forced higher up the mountain and will eventually be left with nowhere to grow.

(2 Feb 2021) » More about Disappearing glaciers are threatening rare alpine plants with extinction


Why the use of foetal protection laws needs to be reviewed

In this article, Dr Emma Milne from our Law School comments on the use of the criminal law to punish women who are deemed to be acting in ways that harm their foetuses. She emphasises that we need to think long and hard as to whether the law is used correctly.

(28 Jan 2021) » More about Why the use of foetal protection laws needs to be reviewed


How the legend of the Game of Thrones wolves lives on

For fans of the TV show Game of Thrones, dire wolves are often seen as mysterious iconic legends. Dr Angela Perri from our Department of Archeaology reveals some intriguing secrets about these ice age predators. 

(15 Jan 2021) » More about How the legend of the Game of Thrones wolves lives on


Donald Trump and Fox News - what's the story?

Eliza Bechtold from our Law School looks at Fox News, Donald Trump's supporters and the journalists who challenged his narrative.

(13 Nov 2020) » More about Donald Trump and Fox News - what's the story?


Decarbonisation may be the wrong goal for energy

Low carbon energy sources aren't all equally well suited to getting us to net-zero emissions. Simone Abram, Alton Horsfall and Andrew Crossland from our Durham Energy Institute, explain why.

(5 Nov 2020) » More about decarbonisation may be the wrong goal for energy


Why have plans for the UK Holocaust Memorial stalled?

Handwritten notes, marking Holocaust Memorial day, left on railway tracks in Auschwitz Birkenau

Despite considerable support, concerns over plans for a new UK Holocaust Memorial range from location and cost, to how it should look and whether we need such a building at all. Daniel Adamson from our Department of History explains why it's so important to overcome these obstacles.

(3 Nov 2020) » More about Why have plans for the UK Holocaust Memorial stalled?


Why has the government banned anticapitalism in English classrooms?

Anticapitalism wasn’t banned in English classrooms during the cold war – why is it now? Dr Jennifer Luff from our Department of History, explains below.

 

(1 Oct 2020) » More about Why has the government banned anticapitalism in English classrooms?


Harold Evans was a titan among the greats of British journalism

Professor Tim Luckhurst, Principle of South College, writes about journalist and alumnus, Sir Harold Evans.

(25 Sep 2020) » More about Harold Evans was a titan among the greats of British journalism


How can we preserve the future of primates?

Primates are facing an impending extinction crisis - but research by Professor Jo Setchell has discovered we know very little about what will actually protect them. She explains more below.

(11 Sep 2020) » More about how can we preserve the future of primates?


Exercise - what the government needs to do next

Daily exercise rules got many people moving during lockdown. Dr Sarah Metcalfe is calling on the government to ensure this positive change continues. 

(6 Aug 2020) » More about exercise - what the government needs to do next


How writers hear their characters in their heads

John Foxwell from our English Studies department explains why many writers say they can actually hear the voices of their characters.

(4 Aug 2020) » More about how writers hear their characters in their heads


Retired rugby players more likely than other athletes to suffer long-term injuries

Dr Karen Hind from our School of Sport and Exercise Sciences explains why many retired players report injuries last long after they stop playing.

(24 Jul 2020) » More about retired rugby players more likely than other athletes to suffer long-term injuries


Time to put prevention and support on the agenda for sexual violence at universities

Clarissa Humphreys, our Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Response Manager, and Professor Graham Towl, professor of forensic psychology and formerly Chair of our Sexual Violence Task Force, argue that universities should take a more holistic approach to tackling sexual violence. First published on WonkHE

(6 Jul 2020) » More about Time to put prevention and support on the agenda for sexual violence at universities


South College Motto and Crest Revealed

Professor Tim Luckhurst, Head of South College and Associate PVC Engagement, announces South College’s crest and motto, and explores how it reflects the values of the new community we are creating.

(4 Jun 2020) » More about South College Motto and Crest Revealed


Romosexuality – embracing queer sex and love in Ancient times

Professor Jennifer Ingleheart, from our Department of Classics and Ancient History explains why the Romans' hedonistic approach to love and sexuality should be celebrated.

(14 Feb 2020) » More about romosexuality – embracing queer sex and love in Ancient times


Alien life is out there, but our theories are probably steering us away from it

Dr Peter Vickers, Associate Professor (Reader) in Philosophy, says that in the quest to find extraterrestrial life, scientists must be thoroughly open-minded.

(2 Jan 2020) » More about Alien life is out there, but our theories are probably steering us away from it


Fighting Words: US and China clash on Free Speech

Dr Ge Chen, assistant professor in Chinese Law, explains how a tweet by the US’ national basketball association (NBA), resulted in an instant backlash by the Chinese government

(22 Nov 2019) » More about fighting Words: US and China clash on Free Speech


Fracking in the UK was doomed a decade ago

Jon Gluyas, Professor of Geoenergy, Carbon Capture and Storage, and Dr Magdalena Kuchler from Uppsala University, explain why they believe the UK's Conservatives have wasted precious time on a fossil fuel fantasy. 

(19 Nov 2019) » More about fracking in the UK was doomed a decade ago


The UK Supreme Court: A Constitutional Court in all but name?

Supreme Court

The establishment, in 2009, of a Supreme Court for the United Kingdom was not intended to amount to a radical redesign of the United Kingdom’s constitutional architecture, says Professor Roger Masterman of Durham Law School

(8 Nov 2019) » More about The UK Supreme Court: A Constitutional Court in all but name?


Finding the remnants of a tragic end can help us uncover atrocities

The human body never truly disappears. Professor Rebecca Gowland from our Archaeology Department and Professor Tim Thompson from Teesside University, explain how human remains reveal evidence of atrocities. 

(6 Nov 2019) » More about finding the remnants of a tragic end can help us uncover atrocities


Science as we know it can't explain consciousness

Professor Philip Goff from our Department of Philosophy wants to see a new science of consciousness - he explains why below.

 

(6 Nov 2019) » More about science as we know it can't explain consciousness


Why Botswana’s biggest tests are yet to come

Botswana has just experienced one of its most lively and competitive elections – Dr James Kirby from our Department of History explains why, and looks at the challenges now facing the winning party.

(25 Oct 2019) » More about why Botswana’s biggest tests are yet to come


Dealing with the Climate Emergency

Professors Matthew Jones and Charles Adams believe physics can be more sustainable if physicists change the way they work.

(18 Oct 2019) » More about dealing with the Climate Emergency