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Durham University News

Comment and opinion

Sexual harassment: it’s all part of growing up

Dr Fiona Vera-Gray from Durham Law School talks about sexual harassment being commonly disregarded as an inevitable part of life.

(9 Nov 2017) » More about Sexual harassment: it’s all part of growing up


Trump – Rating the presidency

After a tumultuous year beset by controversy, how should we assess Donald Trump, twelve months on from his US presidential election win? 

(9 Nov 2017) » More about Trump – Rating the presidency


Does the size of the universe prove God doesn't exist?

Dr Emily Thomas from Philosophy examines whether the astronomical discoveries of the last few centuries have implications for religion.

(7 Nov 2017) » More about does the size of the universe prove God doesn't exist?


Qatar blockade and Saudi Arabia: could there be a power shift in Doha?

Dr Christopher Davidson from the School of Government and International Affairs discusses whether there could be a power shift in Doha.

(6 Nov 2017) » More about Qatar blockade and Saudi Arabia: could there be a power shift in Doha?


Time to celebrate the unsung women heroes of peace mediation

While women are active and successful mediators at the grassroots level, they remain largely invisible in international peacemaking.

(31 Oct 2017) » More about time to celebrate the unsung women heroes of peace mediation


What is space? The 300-year-old philosophical battle that is still raging today

Dr Emily Thomas, from Philosophy, examines the way debate over the definition of space has unfurled and grown in the last 300 years.

(19 Oct 2017) » More about what is space? The 300-year-old philosophical battle that is still raging today


Why the US withdrawal from UNESCO is a step backwards for global cultural cooperation

Professor Robin Coningham, UNESCO Chair on Archaeological Ethics and Practice in Cultural Heritage, explains why this will result in few benefits.

(19 Oct 2017) » More about why the US withdrawal from UNESCO is a step backwards for global cultural cooperation


A step-change in tackling sexual violence

Owen Adams, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Colleges and Student Experience)

Owen Adams, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Colleges and Student Experience) and Chair of the Sexual Violence and Misconduct Group at Durham University, writes on a step-change in the higher education sector, and Durham's part in it.

(18 Oct 2017) » More about A step-change in tackling sexual violence


Summer-born pupils are labelled incorrectly

There is often a big difference in attainment between younger and older pupils in the same year. Professor Stephen Gorard from the School of Education suggests ways to tackle this.

(6 Oct 2017) » More about Summer-born pupils are labelled incorrectly


Where the Humanities Need No Defense

Professor of Journalism at Emerson College in the US, Ted Gup, spent a term at Durham University as a writer-in-residence. He looks back on his time in the North East of England – 3,148 miles from home. 

(5 Oct 2017) » More about Where the Humanities Need No Defense


Why hunger is on the rise in the world, and what can be done about it

The United Nations reports that global hunger is on the rise for the first time in ten years - Professor Peter Atkins examines the reasons behind this increase.

(3 Oct 2017) » More about why hunger is on the rise in the world, and what can be done about it


How Taylor Swift has become a femme fatale - with a little help from Sylvia Plath

clip from Taylor Swift video - she is in a bath of diamonds

Dr Eleanor Spencer-Regan, Digital Director of the Centre for Poetry and Poetics considers what the former "pop princess" and the confessional poet have in common. 

(20 Sep 2017) » More about how Taylor Swift has become a femme fatale - with a little help from Sylvia Plath


How the UK can benefit from a free trade future after Brexit – even outside the single market

Professor of Finance and Economics, Kevin Dowd (Durham University), Professor David Paton (Nottingham University) and Professor David Blake (University of London) discuss how the UK can benefit from a free trade future after Brexit.

(20 Sep 2017) » More about how the UK can benefit from a free trade future after Brexit – even outside the single market


What new barriers can EU citizens expect in their daily lives after Brexit?

Professor Eleanor Spaventa warns that EU citizens living in Britain should prepare to present documentation whenever they interact with the state.

(13 Sep 2017) » More about what new barriers can EU citizens expect in their daily lives after Brexit?


Primacy of the law has been asserted in Kenya – but the aftermath is unpredictable

Professor Justin Willis considers the potential impact of the decision by Kenya's Supreme Court to declare the election null and void. 

(7 Sep 2017) » More about primacy of the law has been asserted in Kenya – but the aftermath is unpredictable


A museum of Confederate statues – and how it could help end the American Civil War

Dr Kevin Waite, Assistant Professor in the Department of History, examines the fierce debate in the United States surrounding confederate memorials and suggests a solution.

(24 Aug 2017) » More about a museum of Confederate statues – and how it could help end the American Civil War


Why 'upskirting' needs to be made a sex crime

Clare McGlynn, Professor of Law at Durham and University of Birmingham's Professor Erika Rackley explain why a new law against upskirting is urgently needed.

(18 Aug 2017) » More about why 'upskirting' needs to be made a sex crime


Nosy neighbours and the outsourcing of UK gun control

Dr Sam Hillyard from the School of Applied Social Sciences, discusses nosy neighbours and the outsourcing of UK gun control. 

(11 Aug 2017) » More about nosy neighbours and the outsourcing of UK gun control


Kenya’s elections are much more than just a ruthless game of thrones

Professor Justin Willis from the Department of History and Professor Nic Cheeseman (University of Birmingham) talk about the threat of controversy and unrest that looms over Kenya’s election.

(3 Aug 2017) » More about Kenya’s elections are much more than just a ruthless game of thrones


Understanding why some female teachers sexually abuse pupils

Andrea J Darling, who is studying for a PhD in the School of Applied Social Sciences, discusses why some female teachers sexually abuse pupils. 

(11 Jul 2017) » More about Understanding why some female teachers sexually abuse pupils


How badly implemented land reform can affect wildlife: a Zimbabwean case study

Credit: Durham University

Dr Sam Williams Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Anthropology talks about land reform affecting wildlife.

Large carnivores are in decline all over the world. Threats like persecution and loss of both prey and habitat are key contributors. The planet’s top biodiversity hotspots have already lost around 90% of their primary (undisturbed) vegetation, driven by factors like growth of infrastructure, agriculture and the removal of natural resources.

(29 Jun 2017) » More about How badly implemented land reform can affect wildlife: a Zimbabwean case study


Twenty years on, Harry Potter continues to cast a spell on readers

Dr Eleanor Spencer-Regan Vice-Principal and Senior Tutor of St Chad's College and member of Department of English Studies considers the enduring appeal of Harry Potter.

(26 Jun 2017) » More about twenty years on, Harry Potter continues to cast a spell on readers


Is there enough good evidence to inform teaching in schools?

Professor Stephen Gorard talks about the importance of using solid evidence to inform education practice.

(21 Jun 2017) » More about is there enough good evidence to inform teaching in schools?


Fact Check: is China dumping steel?

Fact Check: is China dumping steel?

Professor Ian Greenwood and Professor Ray Hudson examine if China is dumping steel.

(15 Jun 2017) » More about Fact Check: is China dumping steel?


What's the difference between TPIMs and control orders?

Professor Helen Fenwick from Durham Law School explains the difference between Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures (TPIMs) and control orders.

(8 Jun 2017) » More about what's the difference between TPIMs and control orders?


Linking lone wolf killers to Islamic State magnifies the threat – and could inspire future attacks

Dr Alan Greene believes the way we talk about terrorist attacks can help the extremists' cause.

(6 Jun 2017) » More about linking lone wolf killers to Islamic State magnifies the threat – and could inspire future attacks


This election must not result in another failed NHS Experiment

Professor David Hunter, from the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health explains that the election must not become an excuse for shelving much needed health system transformation.

(30 May 2017) » More about this election must not result in another failed NHS Experiment


Time travel: a conversation between a scientist and a literature professor

Literature professor Simon John James and physicist Richard Bower were both involved in the curating the exhibition, Time Machines – the past, the future, and how stories take us there

(26 May 2017) » More about Time travel: a conversation between a scientist and a literature professor


Walking with Pride

Professor Antony Long, Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Provost, and Lead for Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, explains why the University supports the Pride movement.

(26 May 2017) » More about walking with Pride


Why augmented reality is triggering cultural conflict and religious controversy

A cyclist using augmented reality

Robert Seddon, an Honorary Fellow in the Philosophy Department at Durham University explores why augmented reality is triggering cultural conflict and religious controversy.

(25 May 2017) » More about Why augmented reality is triggering cultural conflict and religious controversy


Disagreements on what Europe means go back to the 16th century

Europe depicted as a queen, Sebastian Munster, 1570

Niall OddyDurham Universityexplores how the idea of Europe was forged.

(19 May 2017) » More about Disagreements on what Europe means go back to the 16th century


Sport for peace and development: Zambia shows how it can be done

A football game in Zambia. Picture: Iain Lindsey

Iain LindseyDurham UniversityDavies BandaUniversity of EdinburghRuth JeanesMonash University, and Tess KayBrunel University London explore the potential of sport to change lives.

(7 Apr 2017) » More about Sport for peace and development: Zambia shows how it can be done


Does missing one week of school lead to lower grades?

Professor Stephen Gorard takes a critical look at the Government’s case for fining parents who take their children out of school during term.

(6 Apr 2017) » More about does missing one week of school lead to lower grades?


Issue of children who sexually abuse other children is not something that can be ignored

Professor Simon Hackett explains why children who sexually abuse other children should not be treated like criminals.

(7 Mar 2017) » More about issue of children who sexually abuse other children is not something that can be ignored


People have been used as bargaining chips before - by Romania's Nicolae Ceausescu

As EU citizens' rights are debated by the UK government and the House of Lords, Dr James Koranyi, Lecturer in Modern European History, sees parallels in recent Romanian history.

(2 Mar 2017) » More about people have been used as bargaining chips before - by Romania's Nicolae Ceausescu


The next scientific breakthrough could come from the history books

Dr Giles Gasper, Professor Tom McLeish and Oxford colleague Professor Hannah Smithson explain why it's important to study the history of science.

 

(1 Mar 2017) » More about the next scientific breakthrough could come from the history books


Do schools in the North East of England under-perform?

The Northern Powerhouse Partnership has recommended that ‘urgent attention’ must be given to improving education in the North of England. Professor Stephen Gorard from the School of Education looks at the evidence for the North East.

(3 Feb 2017) » More about Do schools in the North East of England under-perform?


Trump's travel ban is nothing to do with national security

Dr Alan Greene from the Law School explains why Trump’s executive order on refugees and foreign arrivals has everything to do with the optics of the situation.

(2 Feb 2017) » More about Trump's travel ban is nothing to do with national security


Earthquakes triggered by humans pose growing risk

Professor Gillian Foulger , Professor Jon Gluyas and PhD student Miles Wilson from the Department of Earth Sciences explain how their research showed that mining-related activity accounts for the largest number of earthquakes.

(27 Jan 2017) » More about Earthquakes triggered by humans pose growing risk


It's important to listen to imaginary voices – just ask Virginia Woolf

Professor Patricia Waugh from the Department of English Studies believes Virginia Woolf's archive can be seen as a serious resource for research into the experience of hearing voices.

(24 Jan 2017) » More about it's important to listen to imaginary voices – just ask Virginia Woolf


60% of primate species now threatened with extinction

Professor Jo Setchell from the Department of Anthropology explains why we are responsible for the dire situation facing our closest biological relatives.

(19 Jan 2017) » More about 60% of primate species now threatened with extinction


Durham University is key to bright future

The importance of having one of the world’s top 100 universities is central to Durham’s position as a first-class business destination – and there are dynamic plans in place to accelerate the momentum of recent years.

(9 Jan 2017) » More about Durham University is key to bright future


Whose fault is PISA?

Professor Peter Tymms from the School of Education and Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring questions how much we can take from the recent international education rankings results.

(16 Dec 2016) » More about whose fault is PISA?


The wonders of Graphene

Karl Coleman Professor of Chemistry and Nanomaterials and Director of Research in the Chemistry Department, explains how folding graphene like origami, may allow us to wear sensors in our skin.

(30 Jul 2015) » More about the wonders of Graphene


 

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