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Durham University News

Comment and opinion

Moana fulfils Disney's long journey from timid princess to empowered working woman

Professor Mark Learmonth, Durham Business School and colleagues Nancy Harding (University of Bradford) and Martyn Griffin (University of Leeds) have written a study on the depiction of the working woman in Disney films. 

(7 Dec 2016) » More about Moana fulfils Disney's long journey from timid princess to empowered working woman


How PTSD treatment can learn from ancient warrior rituals

Karen O'Donnell, Research Fellow in CODEC, describes how lessons may be learned from ancient cultures to help support armed forces personnel today.

(30 Nov 2016) » More about how PTSD treatment can learn from ancient warrior rituals


Does global warming mean the Arctic's fabled energy resources will finally be exploited?

Research postgraduate Michael Laiho from the Durham Energy Institute dispels four myths about the Arctic's oil and gas reserves.

(28 Nov 2016) » More about does global warming mean the Arctic's fabled energy resources will finally be exploited?


It will take more than a newspaper columnist to solve England’s teacher shortage

Beng Haut See, School of Education, says the current teacher shortage is not necessarily a case of people not wanting to go into teaching, but rather a result of uncoordinated policy decisions.

(25 Nov 2016) » More about It will take more than a newspaper columnist to solve England’s teacher shortage


Why is breathlessness invisible?

As part of the Life of Breath project, Professor Jane Macnaughton, Co-Director in the Centre for Medical Humanities, examines Breathlessness, and looks at how research may lead to new treatments to relieve the distressing symptoms of this debilitation condition.

(16 Nov 2016) » More about why is breathlessness invisible?


China grapples with the mixed blessing of a Trump victory

Image of US and China flags

Following Donald Trump's victory in the US Presidential Elections, Professor Niv Horesh, School of Government and International Affairs, explores what the future may hold for the relationship between the US and China.

(15 Nov 2016) » More about China grapples with the mixed blessing of a Trump victory


Why CSI: Space will be a far greater challenge than forensic science on Earth

Mehzeb Chowdhury, School of Applied Social Sciences, questions how, or whether, terrestrial methods of inflicting violence can be used in space, and if so, whether terrestrial methods of criminal investigation are up to the job.

(15 Nov 2016) » More about why CSI: Space will be a far greater challenge than forensic science on Earth


Ankle tags, house arrest and forced relocation: how does Britain balance security and civil rights?

Professor Helen Fenwick from Durham Law School looks at the recent use of TPIMs, Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures, as a counter-terror strategy.

(10 Nov 2016) » More about ankle tags, house arrest and forced relocation: how does Britain balance security and civil rights?


Earworms: why some songs get stuck in our heads

Image of boy playing a guitar

Music psychologist Dr Kelly Jakubowski investigates the features that may increase the likelihood of a particular piece of music becoming an earworm.

(7 Nov 2016) » More about Earworms: why some songs get stuck in our heads


Enemies of the people: MPs and press gang up on the constitution over High Court Brexit ruling

Gavin Phillipson, Professor at Durham Law School, explains that the High Court ruling was nothing whatsoever to do with trying to stop the UK leaving the EU: it was making a purely legal finding about whether it is parliament or the government that can lawfully implement the decision to leave.

(4 Nov 2016) » More about Enemies of the people: MPs and press gang up on the constitution over High Court Brexit ruling


How gaming technology could hack crime scene investigations

Mehzeb Chowdhury from the School of Applied Social Sciences, looks at how building your own 3D scanner using technology from an Xbox, may significantly reduce the cost of crime scene technologies for thousands of police forces across the world.

(18 Oct 2016) » More about how gaming technology could hack crime scene investigations


Trump and tram reactions show social media's complex role in responding to sexual harassment

Dr Fiona Vera-Gray, from Durham's Centre for Gender Equal Media and Dr Bianca Fileborn, from La Trobe University, Australia use recent high-profile cases to examine the use of social media as a way to speak out about experiences of sexual violence.

(13 Oct 2016) » More about Trump and tram reactions show social media's complex role in responding to sexual harassment


World's oldest muscle-fibre fossil reveals the origin of legs

Dr Martin Smith, Lecturer in Palaeontology in Earth Sciences, explains how a millimetre-long fossil found in China provides insight into the evolutionary transition that led to the origin of legs.

(28 Sep 2016) » More about world's oldest muscle-fibre fossil reveals the origin of legs


Hinkley C must be the first of many new nuclear plants

Image of nuclear power station

Following Government approval of the Hinkley Point C nuclear power station, Professor Simon Hogg, Director of the Durham Energy Institute, says a major programme of new nuclear plants is needed to ensure sufficient long term energy for the UK.

(16 Sep 2016) » More about Hinkley C must be the first of many new nuclear plants


Why sad songs say so much to some of us

Professor Tuomas Eerola from the Department of Music has discovered why some of us enjoy sad music more than others – and it’s got a lot to do with empathy.

(16 Sep 2016) » More about why sad songs say so much to some of us


Does selective schooling work anywhere in the world?

Child sitting in a classroom

Professor Stephen Gorard from the School of Education has looked at the use of selective schooling around the world to see if any result in making "schools work for everyone".

(15 Sep 2016) » More about does selective schooling work anywhere in the world?


 

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