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University Library

Researcher Development Programme

The Library provides training workshops throughout the Michaelmas and Epiphany terms. These are illustrated in the image below, are advertised through CAROD's Researcher Development Programme and are bookable through the training booking system.

Slides for some sessions will be made available from the CAROD training blog at the end of each term.

The Library also provides additional inductions, updates and training through academic departments, as well as training programs such as the:

If you would like to arrange a 1-to-1 support meeting, or arrange a session with a Liaison Librarian on a specific topic or resource, please contact James Bisset.


Training Pathways 2017/18

The sessions listed below are scheduled to run and can be booked via the Training Booking System.


Introduction to the Library

A short practical workshop providing an introduction and overview to the services provided by the University Library for PGRs, and how to use the Library Catalogue and Library Discover Service effectively as researchers to find materials. Essential for new Durham students, useful as a refresher or upskilling for returning Durham students.

This session includes a short tour of the Bill Bryson Library, covering the dedicated PGR study room as well as other group and independent study rooms, research collections, printing and copying facilities, pc labs and self-service facilities.

Many of you will not have separate inductions organised by your departments, so this is your chance to get on top of the basics and ask any initial questions. This session also underpins other sessions which may cover subject databases and other resources in more detail.


Finding Information: Search Strategies

The session will provide an overview of the tools available construct an effective and efficient search which can be applied across a range of academic online databases (proximity connectors, truncation and wildcard searches, Boolean searches, citation searching), with an emphasis on saving your time whilst finding the most relevant information to your research topic.

- This session acts as an introduction to content covered in courses Finding Information: Google Scholar fro Researchers (GD434), Keeping up to date with Emerging research (GD597) and Finding Information: eJournals and Library Databases for researchers (GD610).


Finding Information: eJournals and Library Databases for researchers

It is likely that you are already familiar with some sources you have used previously to find and locate academic and practitioner materials.

This session aims to introduce you to a range of bibliographic and multidisciplinary databases of academic journals, conference papers, books, reports and research data, and allow you to explore these and other subject specific databases to which you have access to whilst researching at Durham.

This session does not aim to cover every database (you have access to several hundred) in detail, but provides an overview of how to access all of the databases you have access to, and of the main functionality of several platforms on which academic databases for many subject areas are based: Web of Science, Ebscohost, Proquest, OViD. You will have an opportunity to explore these and ask questions.


Finding Information: Google Scholar for researchers

Many researchers will already be very familiar with Google Scholar. Google Scholar indexes peer-reviewed academic content from some of the largest scholarly publishers, as well as other non-peer-reviewed material aimed at a practitioner or scholarly audience. This provides greater visibility of academic content, if not always a means to access the full text.

This session aims to cover Google Scholar for those researchers already familiar with the service, and those who have never used it before. It will cover how to make the most of Google Scholar as a researcher at Durham, from some of the basic search tools you can use to improve your searching, through to some of the additional tools available to simplify the process of access the articles you find and refining or expanding your search. It will also highlight where a search on Google Scholar may not be working in the way you expect.

This session will also look at Google Scholar as a profile service for the academic author, to increase the visibility and discoverability of your own research output and connect with other researchers and authors. Whilst the primary focus of the session is Googel Scholar, we also present a brief introduction to other resources on the academic web which are changing the shape of scholarly communication and providing free access to both archival materials and emerging research discussions and publication formats.


Finding Information: Discovering Doctoral Theses

This workshop will provide demo’s and hands-on time to explore Durham, UK and international theses collections which are accessible online.

  • Doctoral Theses, both within the UK and internationally, offering access to original research information that may not be available elsewhere, as well as an opportunity to familiarise yourself with how other people have written and presented their Thesis.
  • Your thesis, providing an awareness of the issues you need to consider from the start of your research as to how and when your thesis will be available, and what you should think about in advance of then around copyright, embargo and supplementary materials.

Finding Information: Historic Newspapers and News Resources

This workshop will provide demo’s and hands-on time to explore the online and (if requested) microfilm collections of current and historic newspaper and news sources available within the library collection.


Critical Reading for Researchers (with the English Language Centre)

No matter which academic discipline you are working in, reading will be a central part of your life while you're working on your doctorate. Reading large amounts of text will almost certainly be necessary for your research, but the quality of your reading will be at least as important as the quantity. The success of your doctoral studies will depend on your being a 'good' reader, and reading in the appropriate way.

In the context of academic research, good reading is critical reading. 'Critical reading' does not mean taking an unreasonably negative or hostile attitude towards a text; rather, it means moving beyond simply understanding the texts you read, and evaluating them and assessing their strengths and weaknesses. Critical readers do not read each text in isolation; they develop strategies for comparing different texts, seeing the relationships between texts, and evaluating each text in terms of the larger academic context.


Open Science, Copyright and selecting where to publish

This session will comprise a series of short, bite-sized workshops covering core topics for PGRs writing their thesis, or looking to publish in academic journals. It includes:

  • Copyright for researchers; teaching materials, your thesis and publication.
  • Thinking about where to publish: journal rankings, journal selection and predatory journals.
  • Open Access Publishing: Policy requirements and your future career, options, available funding.
  • Research Data Management: Best practice and policy requirements.

This session will include plenty of time to ask questions and to be introduced to the key support staff at the university able to offer you support and advice.


Copyright for Researchers

This course aims to provide a much needed overview of copyright law in the UK. Throughout the session users would learn about the various rights for authors, length of copyright, "fair dealing", digital copyright, Crown copyright, the licences held by the University and their scope, "orphan works", "creative commons", and the UK government licencing scheme.

The session will be delivered by Colin Theakston, Academic Liaison Librarian and University Copyright Officer


Publishing in Journals: Understanding Journal Rankings and Responsible Metrics

This session will focus on publication research indicators (bibliometrics such as the Journal Impact Factor and SCImago, author metrics such as the h-index and g-index) and sources for accessing citation data (Web of Science, Journal Citation Reports and Google Scholar). These may be one of several factors to consider when thinking about where to submit an article manuscript for publication to maximise the potential academic impact of the research, and tools useful to be familiar with if they form part of any research evaluation you and your authored journal papers may be subject to.

An additional section will also look at tips to consider when writing an article abstract to maximise its discoverability, and hopefully its cite-ability.

[Please note that for some subject areas, particularly in the arts and humanities and some areas of the social sciences, citation data is less accessible and in some cases seen as less important than it might be in other subject areas.]


Finding and Managing Information (with Endnote Online) (with CAROD)

Ensure you make the best start to your research career with this essential course. Learn how to locate information for your Doctorate and manage your findings in this hands-on session.

Finding Information: The session will provide a brief introduction to finding information (books, journals, theses) via the library (library catalogue, library Discover service, subject databases), a brief introduction to citation searching and an overview of useful services to be aware of when hitting brick walls during your search.

-This session duplicates some content covered in courses GD609: Introduction to the Library, and GD587: Keeping up to date with emerging research; It also acts an introduction to content covered in GD613:Finding Information : Google Scholar and the Academic Web and GD615: Finding Information : Bibliographic and Subject Databases and GD 610: Finding Information : Discovering Doctoral Theses and Conference Papers.

Managing Information: Throughout the session you will learn how to make use of Endnote Online, bibliographic software to store the references you locate and automatically build bibliographies in Word.


Historical Collections for Researchers

Ever wondered whether you could or should be using historical collections in your research?

This session is designed to provide an introduction to finding, accessing and using collections held in archives and libraries across the UK. In addition it will cover citation of primary resources, copyright and using material in your thesis, and utilising Freedom of Information to access records.

The session will also highlight key online primary resources and the wealth of digitised collections available to researchers.

  • TBC

Keeping up-to-date with Emerging Research

Please note that this session will not be running in Michaelmas term.

Please see our web pages for further information, or contact James Bisset for direct help.


Introduction to the Library for Researchers

A short practical workshop providing an introduction and overview to the services provided by the University Library for PGRs, and how to use the Library Catalogue and Library Discover Service effectively as researchers to find materials. Essential for new Durham students, useful as a refresher or upskilling for returning Durham students.

This session includes a short tour of the Bill Bryson Library, covering the dedicated PGR study room as well as other group and independent study rooms, research collections, printing and copying facilities, pc labs and self-service facilities.

Many of you will not have separate inductions organised by your departments, so this is your chance to get on top of the basics and ask any initial questions. This session also underpins other sessions which may cover subject databases and other resources in more detail.


Finding and Managing Information (with Endnote Online) (with CAROD)

Ensure you make the best start to your research career with this essential course. Learn how to locate information for your Doctorate and manage your findings in this hands-on session.

Finding Information: The session will provide a brief introduction to finding information (books, journals, theses) via the library (library catalogue, library Discover service, subject databases), a brief introduction to citation searching and an overview of useful services to be aware of when hitting brick walls during your search.

-This session duplicates some content covered in courses GD609: Introduction to the Library, and GD587: Keeping up to date with emerging research; It also acts an introduction to content covered in GD613:Finding Information : Google Scholar and the Academic Web and GD615: Finding Information : Bibliographic and Subject Databases and GD 610: Finding Information : Discovering Doctoral Theses and Conference Papers.

Managing Information: Throughout the session you will learn how to make use of Endnote Online, bibliographic software to store the references you locate and automatically build bibliographies in Word.


Finding Information: Effective Search Strategies

The session will provide an overview of the tools available construct an effective and efficient search which can be applied across a range of academic online databases (proximity connectors, truncation and wildcard searches, Boolean searches, citation searching), with an emphasis on saving your time whilst finding the most relevant information to your research topic.

- This session acts as an introduction to content covered in courses Finding Information: Google Scholar fro Researchers (GD434), Keeping up to date with Emerging research (GD597) and Finding Information: eJournals and Library Databases for researchers (GD610).


Finding Information: eJournals and Library Databases for researchers

It is likely that you are already familiar with some sources you have used previously to find and locate academic and practitioner materials.

This session aims to introduce you to a range of bibliographic and multidisciplinary databases of academic journals, conference papers, books, reports and research data, and allow you to explore these and other subject specific databases to which you have access to whilst researching at Durham.

This session does not aim to cover every database (you have access to several hundred) in detail, but provides an overview of how to access all of the databases you have access to, and of the main functionality of several platforms on which academic databases for many subject areas are based: Scopus, Web of Science, Ebscohost, Proquest, OViD. You will have an opportunity to explore these and ask questions.

  • Ebscohost provides access to databases including:
  • Anthropology Plus, ATLA Religion Database, British Education Index, Business Source Complete, CINAHL (Nursing and Health Professional Literature), EconLit, Education Resource Information Centre (ERIC), GeoRef, Historical Abstracts, L’Annee Philologique, Math SciNet, Medline, MLA Directory of Periodicals, Philosophher’s Index, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, RILM Abstracts of Music, SPORTDiscus.
  • Proquest provides access to databases including:
  • International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS), Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA), Literature Online, Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA), Political Science Database, Applied Social Sciences Index & Abstracts (ASSIA), Sociological Abstracts, Education Resource Information Centre (ERIC), Education Database, Criminal Justice Database.

Finding Information: Discovering Doctoral Theses

This workshop will provide demo’s and hands-on time to explore Durham, UK and international theses collections which are accessible online.

  • Doctoral Theses, both within the UK and internationally, offering access to original research information that may not be available elsewhere, as well as an opportunity to familiarise yourself with how other people have written and presented their Thesis.
  • Your thesis, providing an awareness of the issues you need to consider from the start of your research as to how and when your thesis will be available, and what you should think about in advance of then around copyright, embargo and supplementary materials.

Finding Information: Google Scholar for researchers

Many researchers will already be very familiar with Google Scholar. Google Scholar indexes peer-reviewed academic content from some of the largest scholarly publishers, as well as other non-peer-reviewed material aimed at a practitioner or scholarly audience. This provides greater visibility of academic content, if not always a means to access the full text.

This session aims to cover Google Scholar for those researchers already familiar with the service, and those who have never used it before. It will cover how to make the most of Google Scholar as a researcher at Durham, from some of the basic search tools you can use to improve your searching, through to some of the additional tools available to simplify the process of access the articles you find and refining or expanding your search. It will also highlight where a search on Google Scholar may not be working in the way you expect.

This session will also look at Google Scholar as a profile service for the academic author, to increase the visibility and discoverability of your own research output and connect with other researchers and authors. Whilst the primary focus of the session is Google Scholar, we also present a brief introduction to other resources on the academic web which are changing the shape of scholarly communication and providing free access to both archival materials and emerging research discussions and publication formats.


Finding Information: Historic Newspapers and News Resources

This workshop will provide demo’s and hands-on time to explore the online and (if requested) microfilm collections of current and historic newspaper and news sources available within the library collection.


Critical Reading for Researchers (with the English Language Centre)

No matter which academic discipline you are working in, reading will be a central part of your life while you're working on your doctorate. Reading large amounts of text will almost certainly be necessary for your research, but the quality of your reading will be at least as important as the quantity. The success of your doctoral studies will depend on your being a 'good' reader, and reading in the appropriate way.

In the context of academic research, good reading is critical reading. 'Critical reading' does not mean taking an unreasonably negative or hostile attitude towards a text; rather, it means moving beyond simply understanding the texts you read, and evaluating them and assessing their strengths and weaknesses. Critical readers do not read each text in isolation; they develop strategies for comparing different texts, seeing the relationships between texts, and evaluating each text in terms of the larger academic context.


Historical Collections for Researchers

Ever wondered whether you could or should be using historical collections in your research?

This session is designed to provide an introduction to finding, accessing and using collections held in archives and libraries across the UK. In addition it will cover citation of primary resources, copyright and using material in your thesis, and utilising Freedom of Information to access records.

The session will also highlight key online primary resources and the wealth of digitised collections available to researchers.

  • TBC

You can see examples of previous feedback from these sessions below.


Training Feedback
Training Feedback

[Above] Aggregate feedback for sessions delivered during the 2016-17 academic year.


Your Academic Liaison Librarian

James Bisset

Academic Liaison Librarian
Researcher Support

james.bisset@durham.ac.uk

0191 334 1589

Training Overview

Researcher 1-2-1

Book a consultation

Need help? Drop me an email or request a 30 minute 1-to-1 consultation to scale any brick walls in your way.