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Law and Global Justice (LGJ)

News

LGJ PGR Seminar: Comparing Historical Trauma in Autobiography: Bolshevik Russia, the Holocaust and Martinican Slaves’

(23 April 2014)

World Heritage Centre on the 21st May from 5-7pm

 

Law and Global Justice is pleased to welcome Sara Louise Cooper from the University of Oxford as invited speaker for the final LGJ PGR Seminar of the year to take place in the World Heritage Centre on the 21st May from 5-7pm. Sara Louise Cooper will be delivering a paper entitled: ‘Comparing Historical Trauma in Autobiography: Bolshevik Russia, the Holocaust and Martinican Slaves’

Law and Global Justice is pleased to welcome Sara Louise Cooper from the University of Oxford as invited speaker for the final LGJ PGR Seminar of the year to take place in the World Heritage Centre on the 21st May from 5-7pm. Sara Louise Cooper will be delivering a paper entitled: ‘Comparing Historical Trauma in Autobiography: Bolshevik Russia, the Holocaust and Martinican Slaves’. Please see an abstract and information on Sara Louise below.

What are the benefits and dangers of a comparative engagement with literary narratives of atrocity? What is revealed or hidden when scholars look at memory of the Holocaust, colonialism and totalitarianism side by side? This paper will evaluate the merits of such a comparative approach with a particular focus on the autobiographical work of Vladimir Nabokov, refugee from Bolshevik Russia, Georges Perec, child of a Holocaust victim, and Patrick Chamoiseau, a contemporary Martinican writer confronting the legacy of slavery.

Sara-Louise Cooper is a doctoral student at Oriel College, Oxford. Her thesis looks at cultural trauma in the autobiographies of Vladimir Nabokov, Georges Perec and Patrick Chamoiseau. She has held a four-month Kluge Junior Research Fellowship at the Library of Congress, Washington D.C. and has an article forthcoming with Editions Hermann in (In)effacer: L'œuvre et ses fins, entitled 'Des cicatrices qui ineffacent: W, ou le souvenir d'enfance de Georges Perec'. She holds an Arts and Humanities Research Council doctoral award and a Graduate Research and Teaching Scholarship at Oriel College, where she teaches French language and literature from the seventeenth century to the present.

As always, nibbles and drinks will be provided. We welcome people from any discipline who may be interested in taking part in discussion after the presentation.