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Durham University

Institute of Advanced Study

Dr Tim Edensor

“The opportunity has expanded my thinking about a range of issues and enabled deeper and more substantive thinking into the topics of my research and writing. ”

Dr Tim Edensor, Manchester Metropolitan University


IAS Fellow at Ustinov College, Durham University (January - March 2014)


Tim Edensor, Reader in Cultural Geography at Manchester Metropolitan University, has contributed to five areas of scholarship: geographies of tourism, national identity, industrial ruins and urban materiality, geographies of rhythm and spaces of illumination and darkness.

His influential research monograph, Tourists at the Taj (1998), critiques the ethnocentrism, over-generalisation and functionalism of theories of tourism. Key findings included the multiple uses of the site by different kinds of tourists, the distinction between ‘enclavic’ and ‘heterogeneous’ tourist spaces, and notions that tourism comprises a range of performances. He has subsequently written about the sensations and rhythms of tourism, and edits the inter-disciplinary journal, Tourist Studies.

His second book, National Identity, Popular Culture and Everyday Life (2002) and subsequent articles focus upon the increasing centrality of everyday life and popular culture in the representations, practices and consumption of national identity. The book has been translated into Polish and Korean, and has led to invitations to discussions with British government ministers Jack Straw (Secretary of State for Justice), Margaret Hodge (Minister at the Department of Culture, Media and Sport) and a recent scoping project on the Future of Identity organised by the Department of Media, Culture and Sport.

Edensor’s book, Industrial Ruins: Space, Aesthetics and Materiality (2005), and ten other articles and chapters have initiated much of the current fascination with the study of ruins. He also developed two websites based (http://www.sci-eng.mmu.ac.uk/industrial_ruins/; http://www.staffs.ac.uk/schools/humanities_and_soc_sciences/te1/). This work examines theories of materiality, memory, heritage, disorder and sensation. He has recently co-written a review paper that accounts for the multiple approaches to ruination of the past decade (Progress in Human Geography 2013).

Edensor recently edited Geographies of Rhythm (2010) and published articles about tourist, commuting and walking rhythm, exploring the relationship between rhythmic temporalities and place, the rhythms of ‘nature’ and the synchronicities of social life. He has also co-edited Spaces of Vernacular Creativity: Rethinking the Cultural Economy (2009), and A World of Cities: Urban Theory Beyond the West (2011).

More recently, Edensor has researched spaces of illumination and darkness, focusing on contested aesthetics, vernacular creativities, the potentialities of darkness, and the effects of artistic lighting works and events. These ideas are discussed in publications on Christmas lights (Sociology 2009), the apprehension of dark space (Social and Cultural Geography 2013; Urban Studies 2014), and an art exhibition review (The Senses and Society 2013). He is currently writing articles on dining in the dark, light festivals, social lighting and the Hayward Gallery’s Light Show. He has also recently established a website and blog (http://www.lightresearch.mmu.ac.uk/) and co-organised two conference sessions on light research.

At the IAS, Edensor will investigate the effects and potentialities of festivals of illumination’ the ways in which they can enrich a sense of place, co-produce atmospheres, defamiliarise and re-enchant the habitually apprehended spaces, and expand the grammar of urban design through creative experimentation.


IAS Fellow's Public Lecture - The Potentialities of Light Festivals
13th March 2014, 18:00 to 18:00, Fisher House, Ustinov College

This lecture examines the increasing use of lighting festivals in regeneration programmes, place branding strategies and place-making endeavours. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of light festivals across the western world and beyond. Lighting is increasingly conceived of as a way to re-enchant place and generate more enduring night-time economies. These festivals mobilise a diverse array of practices and aesthetics that include the production of extraordinary spectacles in central urban areas, more inclusive strategies to illuminate marginal areas of the city, the transformation through illumination of rural settings, and large scale vernacular participation that involves lighting. Dr Tim Edensor will draw on selective examples that span large scale spectaculars and smaller, vernacular events, including Durham’s Lumiere, Lyon’s Fetes des Lumieres, Perthshire’s Enchanted Forest, Matlock Bath River Boat Illuminations, Slaithwaite’s Moonraking Festival and the floats and rituals of Bridgewater Carnival. He will explore the ways in which festive lighting transforms nocturnal space. Dr Edensor will discuss how lighting can enchant space that is habitually apprehended by residents, consumers and workers, transforming, defamiliarising and dematerialising familiar structures, and producing symbolic cultural resonances with other times and places. He will then discuss the particularly rich potential for lighting to generate emerging atmospheres that combine emotion, sensation and affect in concert with the practices of participants and the affordances of space. Finally, Dr Edensor will explore how illumination can engender a rich sense of place by producing a shared conviviality, highlighting symbolic and unheralded features, and alluding to historical processes and events associated with place.

Listen to this lecture in full.

Dr Tim Edensor Publications

Edensor, T. (2018) 'The shifting multiplicity of the lighthouse' in Strang, V., Edensor, T., Puckering, J. (eds.) From the Lighthouse: interdisciplinary reflections on light. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 243.

Edensor, T. (2018) 'The rhythms of place, the rhythms of the lighthouse' in Strang, V., Edensor, T., Puckering, J. (eds.) From the Lighthouse: interdisciplinary reflections on light. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 194-197.

Edensor, T. (2018) 'The deadly lighthouse beam' in Strang, V., Edensor, T., Puckering, J. (eds.) From the Lighthouse: interdisciplinary reflections on light. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 189-191.

Edensor, T. (2018) 'Ambigous beams' in Strang, V., Edensor, T., Puckering, J. (eds.) From the Lighthouse: interdisciplinary reflections on light. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 161-163.

Edensor, T. (2018) 'Emeshed in geographies of sand, sea and war: the lighthouses of Skage Odde' in Strang, V., Edensor, T., Puckering, J. (eds.) From the Lighthouse: interdisciplinary reflections on light. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 122-127.

Edensor, T.(2018) 'Technologies of Light and Power' in Strang, V., Edensor, T., Puckering, J. (eds.) From the Lighthouse: interdisciplinary reflections on light. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 77.

Edensor, T. (2018) 'The redistribution of light and dark at sea' in Strang, V., Edensor, T., Puckering, J. (eds.) From the Lighthouse: interdisciplinary reflections on light. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 74-76.

Strang, V., Edensor, T., Puckering, J. (2018) From the Lighthouse: interdisciplinary reflections on light. Abingdon: Routledge.

Edenso, T. (2017) From Light to Dark. Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press.

Edensor, T. (2016) 'Incipient Ruination: Materiality, destructive agencies and repair', in Bille, M., Sørensen, T.F (eds.) Elements of Architecture: Assembling archaeology, atmosphere and the performance of building spaces, Abingdon: Routledge.

Edensor, T. (2015), 'Blackpool: Blackpool Illuminations – Modernity, Nostalgia and Taste' in Isenstadt, S., PettyM.M., Neumann, D (eds), Cities of Light: Two Centuries of Urban Illumination, Routledge, pp.58-66.

Edensor T (2015) ' Site-specific dance: revealing and contesting the ludic qualities, everyday rhythms, and embodied habits of place', Environment and Planning A, 47(3), pp. 709-726.Edensor T (2015) 'Introduction: Sensing and Perceiving with Light and Dark', The Senses and Society, 10(2), pp.129-137.

Edensor T (2015) 'Light Art, Perception, and Sensation', The Senses and Society, 10(2), pp.138-157.

Edensor, T (2015) 'The gloomy city: Rethinking the relationship between light and dark', Urban Cities, 52(3), pp 422–438.

Edensor, T., Falconer, E. (2014) ‘Dans Le Noir: Eating in the dark: sensation and conviviality in a lightless place’, Cultural Geographies, doi:10.1177/1474474014534814.

Cook, M., Edensor, T. (2014) 'Cycling through Dark Space: Apprehending Landscape Otherwise', Mobilities, 10.1080/17450101.2014.956417.

Edensor, T (2013) 'Reconnecting with darkness: gloomy landscapes, lightless places', Social & Cultural Geography, 14:4, pp 446-465.


Insights Paper

Abstract

In this paper, Dr Tim Edensor considers how light festivals are part of a broader trend that adopts a more innovative approach to lighting design in moving away from homogeneous forms of illumination that flood space with light. There is, increasingly, a greater focus on creativity, an appreciation of the distinctive qualities of place, and a commitment to greater sustainability. He investigates three qualities that are countering standardised, somewhat bland nightscapes, namely defamiliarisation, deepening a sense of place and the production of convivial and festive atmospheres. Dr Tim Edensor provide sexamples from diverse light festivals, including Durham’s Lumiere, staged over four nights in November 2013, and attracting 175,000 people.

Insights Paper