Cookies

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Institute of Advanced Study

Events

Annual King Hussein Memorial Lecture on Cultural Dialogue - Capitalist Practice and the Muslim Subject: grounds for dialogue or terrain of resistance?

25th February 2011, 18:15 to 19:15, Calman Learning Centre, Professor Charles Tripp

'Communism is the enemy standing at the gates, but capitalism is the enemy within' - these words, written in 1960 by the Egyptian cleric, Shaikh Muhammad al-Ghazzali, summed up the feelings of many at the time concerning the twin dangers facing Muslims in a polarised world. 

Charles Tripp will explore how the subsequent collapse and dispersal of 'the enemy at the gates' affected those caught up in the process and the ways in which Muslims have developed multiple and often conflicting strategies to ensure the resilience of their communities in a world not of their own making.

This is the third Annual King Hussein Memorial Lecture on Cultural Dialogue and we are honoured that the guest speaker will be Professor Charles Tripp.   Tripp is Professor of Politics with reference to the Middle East at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.A prominent and well-respected academic, his research focuses on states and ideologies in the Middle East, conflict, and Islamic political thought. He is a world class specialist on Iraq and has contributed as a regional expert to media broadcasters including the BBC and NPR, as well as to print media such as Foreign Affairs, The Guardian and the New Statesman

Abstract 

'Communism is the enemy standing at the gates, but capitalism is the enemy within' - these words, written in 1960 by the Egyptian cleric, Shaikh Muhammad al-Ghazzali, summed up the feelings of many at the time concerning the twin dangers facing Muslims in a polarised world.  The subsequent collapse and dispersal of 'the enemy at the gates' appeared to clear the field for the more insidious workings of a system of political economy that had already shaped the practices and the norms of wealth creation across the globe.  Seductive and enraging in unequal measure, the power of capitalism to reorganise everyday life, to revalue values and to make redundant those ideas and practices that stood in the way of profit transformed the landscape of the Muslim world.  For those caught up in this process, experiencing it not as an abstract set of preferences, but as the unequal exercise of power, it created opportunities, as well as compulsions that have helped to shape a politics of contention ever since.  These are some of the themes that will be explored in a talk that seeks to understand the ways in which Muslims, like their counterparts elsewhere, have struggled to make sense of these experiences, developing multiple and often conflicting strategies to ensure the resilience of their communities in a world not of their own making.

If you would like to attend this event, please confirm your attendance and that of any guest you wish to bring, with Susie Aspinall, Stakeholder Relationship and Events Officer at the address below.

Susie Aspinall, Stakeholder Relations and Events Officer, susie.aspinall@durham.ac.uk

Contact enquiries.ias@durham.ac.uk for more information about this event.

Download this event in iCalendar format


2013-14 Annual Programme: Light